Research Focus

In recent years, our signature areas have helped foster interdisciplinary collaborations. We are teaming with industry and seeking solutions from virtually every corner of campus to solve whole problems—not just parts. From the atomic-scale breakthroughs in nanotechnology to system-changing solutions that ensure global sustainability, we are focused on day-to-day achievements and committed to tomorrow's success.

Research Spotlights

Professor Thomas Talavage
New research into the effects of repeated head impacts on high school football players has shown changes in brain chemistry and metabolism even in players who have not been diagnosed with concussions and suggest the brain may not fully heal during the offseason.
New research findings contradict a fundamental assumption about the functioning of "organic" solar cells made of low-cost plastics, suggesting a new strategy for creating inexpensive solar technology.
ECE researchers have solved a key obstacle in creating the underlying technology for miniature optical sensors to detect chemicals and biological compounds, high-precision spectroscopy, ultra-stable microwave sources, and optical communications systems that transmit greater volumes of information with better quality.
A new study provides guidance to health officials and drinking water providers on how to decontaminate plumbing systems.
Research completed by a team of Purdue researchers, including Professor John Morgan and ChE graduate student Rohit Jaini, suggests active biological mechanisms transport scent and taste compounds known as volatiles from plant cells to the atmosphere, a finding that could overturn the textbook model of volatile emission as a process that occurs solely by diffusion.
Researchers have created a new "plasmonic oxide material" that could make possible devices for optical communications that are at least 10 times faster than conventional technologies.
The discovery of a previously unknown type of metal deformation – sinuous flow - and a method to suppress it could lead to more efficient machining and other manufacturing advances by reducing the force and energy required to process metals.
Cooler schematic diagram
Issam Mudawar, professor in Purdue's School of Mechanical Engineering, has developed a device that could use aircraft fuel to cool hot engine components in order to alleviate the high temperatures generated by high-performance supersonic engines.