College of Engineering, Purdue University

Spotlights

Beth Holloway
The Women in Engineering Program (WIEP), directed by Beth Holloway, has received a 2015 Google Rise Award. The $85,000 partnership award was granted to Science Buddies; WIEP; and girlSPARC (Girls Science Plus Arithmetic Club); to support their collaboration.
Purdue University's Women in Engineering Program (WIEP) is sharing in a 2015 Google Rise Award partnership grant.
Purdue University has joined a group of 122 U.S. universities to educate a new generation of engineers with specialties aimed at tackling some of the most pressing issues facing society.
The Purdue Chapter of Sigma Xi recently announced that Arvind Varma, the R. Games Slayter Distinguished Professor of Chemical Engineering and Jay and Cynthia Ihlenfeld Head of Chemical Engineering, is the recipient of the 2015 Sigma Xi Faculty Research Award. He will be honored at the 2015 Sigma Xi banquet at the John Purdue Room on April 8.
Beth Holloway
Beth Holloway, director of the Women in Engineering Program and assistant dean of undergraduate education for the College of Engineering, has been selected to receive the William Elgin Wickenden Award of the American Society for Engineering Education.
Researchers have shown how to convert waste packing peanuts into high-performance carbon electrodes for rechargeable lithium-ion batteries that outperform conventional graphite electrodes, representing an environmentally friendly approach to reuse the waste.
Layered nanocomposites containing tiny structures mixed into a polymer matrix are gaining commercial use, but their complex nature can hide defects that affect performance.
Officials at a software startup company based on a Purdue University innovation have conducted a study that concludes preinstalled apps on smartphone devices do not use more energy than apps installed by the user, dispelling a common myth.
Lava tubes large enough to house cities could be structurally stable on the moon, according to a theoretical study presented at the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference on Tuesday (March 17).
Progress in developing nanophotonic devices capable of withstanding high temperatures and harsh conditions for applications including data storage, sensing, health care and energy will depend on the research community and industry adopting new "plasmonic ceramic" materials, according to a commentary this week in the journal Science.
The College of Engineering moved up in the rankings to #6, tied with Georgia Tech, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and the University of Michigan. ABE has now been ranked #1 for the seventh consecutive year.
A new process for coating copper nanowires with graphene - an ultrathin layer of carbon – lowers resistance and heating, suggesting potential applications in computer chips and flexible displays.
Indiana Lt. Gov. Sue Ellspermann will give the keynote address Wednesday during the 101st annual Purdue Road School on March 11.
Researchers have used an advanced model to simulate in unprecedented detail the workings of "resistance-switching cells" that might replace conventional memory for electronics applications, with the potential to bring faster and higher capacity computer memory while consuming less energy.
Tiny, perfectly smooth carbon spheres added to motor oil have been shown to reduce friction and wear typically seen in engines by as much as 25 percent, suggesting a similar enhancement in fuel economy.
Purdue University students are joining U.S. Military Academy cadets and Purdue ROTC personnel in a first-of-a-kind staff ride to Gettysburg National Military Park.
Ten exceptional College of Engineering alumni/ae received 2015 Distinguished Engineering Alumni/Alumnae Awards (DEA) at a luncheon on Feb. 20. The college annually recognizes a new class of DEA recipients who have made their expertise felt in a wide range of disciplines and around the world.
Purdue University has formed an industry research consortium as part of a national center to create temperature-control technologies for dynamic energy systems on aerospace vehicles.
Edward Delp, the Charles William Harrison Distinguished Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and professor of biomedical engineering, has been named the 2015 Scientist of the Year by the Society for Imaging Science and Technology (IS&T), and SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics.
The biggest cash donation in Purdue University’s history will fund initiatives designed to foster groundbreaking research, expand high-tech job growth throughout Indiana as well as nationally and globally, and enhance opportunities for students.
Peter Bermel, assistant professor of Electrical & Computer Engineering, is the recipient of a National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER award.
Purdue University associate professor of agricultural and biological engineering Nathan Mosier has been appointed the Indiana Soybean Alliance Soybean Utilization Endowed Chair, continuing a partnership to develop new uses for soybeans.
JoAnn Browning (PhD CE '98), dean of the College of Engineering and the David and Jennifer Spencer Distinguished Chair for the Dean of Engineering at the University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA), has been selected as a one of four Purdue University Distinguished Women Scholars for 2015-2016.
The Purdue Board of Trustees on Thursday (Feb. 12) ratified the distinguished professorship of Ahmed Hassanein, now the Paul L. Wattelet Distinguished Professor of Nuclear Engineering. Hassanein has been the Paul L. Wattelet Professor of Nuclear Engineering and head of the School of Nuclear Engineering since 2009. He also is director of the Center for Materials Under eXtreme Environment.
A new, relatively simple process makes it possible to create biocompatible particles called shape-controllable microgels that could be custom-designed for specific roles such as drug delivery vehicles, tissue engineering building blocks and biomedical research.
A team of Purdue University researchers has been awarded a $1 million W.M. Keck Foundation grant to develop a new type of imaging technology for cell and tissue analysis.
Morgan Hynes, assistant professor in the School of Engineering Education, is the recipient of a National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER award.
Craig Goergen, a Purdue University assistant professor of biomedical engineering, says a new American Heart Association campaign that urges people to call 911 at the first sign of a heart attack can be a life-saver.
Professor John Morgan was elected Fellow of the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE). This prestigious recognition is bestowed on the top two percent of the most accomplished medical and biological engineers responsible for medical discovery and innovation.
Engineering Week, the annual celebration of Purdue's engineering heritage, will move from February to April this year.
Jennifer DeBoer, assistant professor in the School of Engineering Education at Purdue University, is the recipient of a National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER award.
The National Association for Research in Science Teaching (NARST) is awarding its 2015 Outstanding Doctoral Research Award to Dr. Allison Godwin.
Purdue's Engineering Professional Education program was ranked fourth among online engineering graduate programs by U.S. News & World Report's Best Online Program rankings.
Kendra Erk, assistant professor of materials engineering, was named on Jan. 6, 2015 to receive a Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Program Award from the National Science Foundation.
Rebecca Krone Kramer, assistant professor of mechanical engineering, has been named to the Forbes’ 2015 "30 Under 30 Who are Moving the World" list in the manufacturing category. The list highlights innovators under the age of 30 “who are modernizing the way things are made in a greener, tech-savvy world.” This is the fourth year that Forbes has published the list.