PEDLS Jeff Dean — Lecture

Event Date: April 10, 2024
Speaker: Jeffrey Dean, Chief Scientist, Google Research and Google DeepMind
Time: TBD
Location: ARMS Atrium
Priority: No
School or Program: Electrical and Computer Engineering
College Calendar: Show
Five Exciting Trends in Machine Learning

Jeff Dean

Abstract

In this talk I'll highlight five exciting trends in the field of AI and machine learning. Through a combination of improved algorithms and major efficiency improvements in ML-specialized hardware, we are now able to build much more capable, general purpose machine learning than ever before. This has dramatic implications for the range of problems to which ML can be applied in the world. I'll highlight some of these applications in science, engineering, health and sustainability, and also discuss ways in which we can gain a better understanding of ML systems and how they behave in the real world.

This talk will present work done by many people at Google.

Biography

Jeff Dean joined Google in 1999 and is currently Google's Chief Scientist, focusing on AI advances for Google DeepMind and Google Research. His areas of focus include machine learning and AI, and applications of AI to problems that help billions of people in societally beneficial ways. He has co-designed/implemented many generations of Google's crawling, indexing, and query serving systems, and co-designed/implemented major pieces of Google's initial advertising and AdSense for Content systems. He is also a co-designer and co-implementor of Google's distributed computing infrastructure, including the MapReduce, BigTable and Spanner systems, protocol buffers, the open-source TensorFlow system for machine learning, and a variety of internal and external libraries and developer tools.

Jeff received a Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of Washington in 1996, working with Craig Chambers on whole-program optimization techniques for object-oriented languages. He received a B.S. in computer science & economics from the University of Minnesota in 1990. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, and of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a Fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Sciences (AAAS), and a winner of the 2012 ACM Prize in Computing.

Hosted by the College of Engineering and the Elmore Family School of Electrical and Computer Engineering.