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Lighting and Daylighting Design of Buildings

CE51300

Credit Hours:

3

Learning Objective:

Upon successful completion of this course the student shall be able to: (i) understand fundamental illumination concepts (ii) design and assess the performance of lighting systems in buildings (iii) build and solve lighting and daylighting models using advanced software and programming techniques to design lighting systems and calculate energy savings from the use of natural light and lighting controls.

Description:

Lighting accounts for at least 30% of the energy consumption in commercial buildings. This course focuses on the design of illumination systems in buildings (electric and natural lighting) in order to achieve energy efficiency and visual comfort. The first part of the course includes analytical lighting calculation techniques, visual perception, radiative transfer, lamp characteristics, electric lighting system design and control for calculation of required indoor illuminance levels. The second part of the course covers daylighting (natural lighting) systems, including state-of-the-art daylighting prediction models as well as design and control of such devices and advanced metrics. The course also has a lab section, in which the students learn how to work with lighting and daylighting tools; and a term project, to build their own computational transient lighting models in open source programming languages, in order to design illumination systems and predict electricity consumption and potential energy savings.

Topics Covered:

Lighting metrics, calculations and measurements; Illuminance from non-point sources; Vision and color; Radiant energy and light; Lamps; Luminaires and controls for interior lighting; Interior lighting design: average and detailed illuminance calculations; Radiosity and ray-tracing methods; Daylighting prediction models; Windows and optics; Shading and daylight control systems; Visual comfort; Daylighting metrics; Computer software and tools.

Prerequisites:

Graduate standing or permission from instructor

Applied / Theory:

60 / 40

Web Content:

Syllabus, grades, lecture notes, homework assignments, solutions and quizzes

Homework:

Grading is weighted 20% on homework, 30% on a project, and 50% on exams

Projects:

The course has a term project, where students will develop their own computational transient lighting models in open source programming languages, in order to design illumination systems and predict electricity consumption and potential energy savings.

Exams:

Two midterm exams, no final exam

Textbooks:

Computer Requirements:

The course has a computer lab session, where students learn how to use (free) lighting design software, as well as applying programming skills for their term projects. Computer access is required.

ProEd Minimum Requirements:

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Tuition & Fees:

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