J. William Uhrig and Anastasia Vournas Distinguished Short Course Series

Purdue AAE has one of the top aerospace engineering educational and research programs in the nation and the world. To further help enrich the educational experience for our students, AAE launched in November 2017 the J. William Uhrig and Anastasia Vournas Distinguished Short Course Series.


The 2019 J. William Uhrig and Anastasia Vournas Distinguished Short Course Series is presented by

Paul Bevilaqua

Lockheed Martin
(Retired)

Date: March 26, 2019 - March 28, 2019

Time: 5:30 pm - 7:30 pm

Location: WALC 1132

Abstract

This V/STOL short course is intended for engineers, pilots, and managers who would benefit from an overview of V/STOL aircraft technologies, design, and performance. Fundamental concepts and technologies in V/STOL aircraft design will be discussed. Topics will include the design of V/STOL aircraft, powered lift and ground effects, propulsion systems and components, structures, controls and flying qualities, as well as model and flight testing. The design, development and testing of successful and unsuccessful V/STOL aircraft will be reviewed for their important lessons learned.

Bio

Paul Bevilaqua has spent much of his career developing V/STOL aircraft and has made key theoretical contributions as well as practical innovations in V/STOL aircraft design. He joined Lockheed Martin as the Chief Aeronautical Scientist and became Chief Engineer of the Skunk Works, where he played a leading role in creating the Joint Strike Fighter. He invented the dual cycle propulsion system that made a supersonic V/STOL aircraft practical and suggested that conventional and naval variants of this aircraft could be developed to create a common, affordable aircraft for all three services. He subsequently led the engineering team that demonstrated the feasibility of building this aircraft.

Prior to joining Lockheed Martin, he was Manager of Advanced Programs at Rockwell International’s Navy aircraft plant, where he led the design of V/STOL interceptor and transport aircraft. He began his career as an Air Force officer at Wright Patterson AFB, where he developed an ejector lift system for an Air Force V/STOL Search and Rescue Aircraft.

He earned a BS in Aerospace Engineering at the University of Notre Dame and a PhD in Aeronautics and Astronautics at Purdue University. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a Fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. He has received awards for aircraft design and V/STOL technologies from the USAF, AIAA, SAE, and AHS and his propulsion system won the Collier Trophy, which each year recognizes “the greatest achievement in aeronautics or astronautics in America”.

The competition to produce the Joint Strike Fighter was won when the VSTOL X-35 technology demonstrator aircraft made a short takeoff, went supersonic, and then landed vertically, the first time any aircraft had accomplished this feat. This achievement was made possible by its innovative dual-cycle propulsion system, invented by Paul Bevilaqua.

Bevilaqua has spent much of his career developing V/STOL aircraft and has made key theoretical contributions as well as practical innovations in V/STOL aircraft design. He joined Lockheed Martin as the Chief Aeronautical Scientist and became Chief Engineer of the Skunk Works, where he played a leading role in creating the Joint Strike Fighter. In addition to inventing the propulsion system, he suggested that conventional and Naval variants of this aircraft could be developed to create a common, affordable aircraft for all three services. He subsequently led the engineering team that demonstrated the feasibility of building this aircraft. His propulsion system won the Collier Trophy, which each year recognizes “the greatest achievement in aeronautics or astronautics in America”.

Prior to joining Lockheed Martin, he was Manager of Advanced Programs at Rockwell International’s Navy aircraft plant, where he led the design of V/STOL interceptor and transport aircraft. He began his career as an Air Force officer at Wright Patterson AFB, where he developed an ejector lift system for an Air Force VSTOL Search and Rescue Aircraft.

He earned a BS in Aerospace Engineering at the University of Notre Dame and a PhD in Aeronautics and Astronautics at Purdue University. His study of turbulent wakes set a new direction for research into the structure of turbulence.

He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a Fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. He is also the recipient of a USAF Scientific Achievement Award, AIAA and SAE Aircraft Design Awards, AIAA and AHS V/STOL Awards, and Lockheed Martin AeroStar and Nova Awards. He was awarded an Honorary Doctorate by the University of Cranfield and voted Engineer of the Year by the readers of Design News.