Teaching Engineering

Phillip C. Wankat & Frank S. Oreovicz, Purdue University

Title Page

Preface

Table of Contents

Reader's Road Map and Glossary

Chapter 1. INTRODUCTION:  TEACHING ENGINEERING

1.1  Why Teach Teaching Now? 1
1.2  The Components of Good Teaching 4
1.3  Philosophical Approach 5
1.4  What Works:  A Compendium of Learning Principles 6
1.5  Chapter Comments 7
1.6  Summary and Objectives 8

Chapter 2. EFFICIENCY

2.1  Goal Setting 11
2.2  Priorities and To-Do Lists 12
2.3  Work Habits 14
2.4  Travel 19
2.5  Teaching Efficiency 20
2.6  Research Efficiency 22
2.7 Handling Stress 23
2.8 Limitations 25
2.9 Chapter Comments 26
2.10 Summary and Objectives 27
Appendix 2A  The Rational-Emotive Therapy Approach 29

Chapter 3. DESIGNING YOUR FIRST CLASS

3.1  Types of Courses 32
3.2  Before the Course Starts 33
3.3  The First Class 36
3.4  The Second Class 38
3.5  The Rest of the Semester 39
3.6  The New Faculty Member Experience 42
3.7 Chapter Comments 43
3.8 Summary and Objectives 44

Chapter 4. COURSES: OBJECTIVES AND TEXTBOOKS

4.1  Course Goals and Objectives 46
4.2  Taxonomies or Domains of Knowledge 49
4.3  The Interaction of Teaching Styles and Objectives 53
4.4  Developing the Content of the Course 55
4.5  Textbooks 56
4.6  Accreditation Constraints on Undergraduate Programs 60
4.7 Chapter Comments 63
4.8 Summary and Objectives 63

Chapter 5. PROBLEM SOLVING AND CREATIVITY

5.1  Problem Solving–An Overview 66
5.2  Novice and Expert Problem Solvers 68
5.3  Problem-Solving Strategies 70
5.4  Getting Started or Getting Unstuck 73
5.5  Teaching Problem Solving 75
5.6  Creativity 79
5.7 Chapter Comments 84
5.8 Summary and Objectives 85

Chapter 6. LECTURES

6.1  Advantages and Disadvantages of Lectures 89
6.2  Content Selection and Organization 91
6.3  Performance 93
6.4  Questions 99
6.5  Building Interpersonal Rapport in Lectures 103
6.6  Special Lecture Methods 105
6.7 Handling Large Classes 108
6.8 Lectures as Part of a Course 110
6.9 Chapter Comments 111
6.10 Summary and Objectives 111

Chapter 7. NONTECHNOLOGICAL ALTERNATIVES TO LECTURE

7.1  Discussion 114
7.2  Cooperative Group Learning 121
7.3  Other Group Methods for Involving Students 128
7.4  Mastery and Self-Paced Instruction 131
7.5  Independent Study Classes: Increasing Curriculum Flexibility 137
7.6  Field Trips and Visits 138
7.7 Chapter Comments 139
7.8 Summary and Objectives 140

Chapter 8. TEACHING WITH TECHNOLOGY (Being Updated)

8.1  Television and Video 145
8.2  Computers in Engineering Education 152
8.3  Audiotutorial Method 161
8.4  Chapter Comments 163
8.5  Summary and Objectives 164

Chapter 8 Addendum

Chapter 9. DESIGN AND LABORATORY

9.1  Design 168
9.2  Laboratory Courses 179
9.3  Chapter Comments 184
9.4  Summary and Objectives 185

Chapter 10. ONE-TO-ONE TEACHING AND ADVISING

10.1  Listening Skills 189
10.2  Tutoring and Helping Students 194
10.3  Advising and Counseling 201
10.4  Research Advisers 205
10.5  Chapter Comments 210
10.6  Summary and Objectives 210

Chapter 11. TESTING, HOMEWORK, AND GRADING

11.1  Testing 214
11.2  Scoring 221
11.3  Homework 226
11.4  Projects 228
11.5  Grading 229
11.6  Chapter Comments 232
11.7 Summary and Objectives 232

Chapter 12. STUDENT CHEATING, DISCIPLINE, AND ETHICS

12.1  Cheating 235
12.2  Other Discipline Problems 238
12.3  Teaching Ethics 240
12.4  Chapter Comments 242
12.5  Summary and Objectives 242

Chapter 13. PSYCHOLOGICAL TYPE AND LEARNING

13.1  From Jung to the MBTI 245
13.2  Psychological Type: Attitudes and Functions 246
13.3  Applications of the MBTI in Engineering Education 252
13.4  Difficulties with Psychological Testing 258
13.5  Conclusions 259
13.6  Chapter Comments 259
13.7 Summary and Objectives 260
Appendix 13A MBTI Model for Problem Solving 263

Chapter 14. MODELS OF COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT:
PIAGET AND PERRY

14.1  Piaget’s Theory 264
14.2  Perry’s Theory of Development of College Students 269
14.3  Chapter Comments 280
14.4  Summary and Objectives 281

Chapter 15. LEARNING THEORIES

15.1  Constructivism and the Scientific Learning Cycle 284
15.2  Learning and Teaching Styles 288
15.3  Kolb’s Learning Cycle 292
15.4  Motivation 297
15.5  Chapter Comments 302
15.6  Summary and Objectives 303

Chapter 16. EVALUATION OF TEACHING

16.1  Formative and Summative Evaluations 306
16.2  Methods for Doing Student Evaluations 309
16.3  Student Evaluations: Reliability, Validity, and Extraneous Variables 312
16.4  Other Evaluation Procedures 318
16.5  Chapter Comments 321
16.6  Summary and Objectives 321

Chapter 17. PROFESSIONAL CONCERNS

17.1  Promotion and Tenure 324
17.2  Faculty Environment 331
17.3  Faculty Developmentons 337
17.4  Professional Ethics 340
17.5  Guideposts for Engineering Education (Hougen’s Principles) 342
17.6  Chapter Comments 344
17.7 Summary and Objectives 344

Appendix A. Obtaining an Academic Position

Appendix B. Sample Teaching Course Outline

Index

Teaching Engineering: The Entire Book