Descriptions of FYE Required Courses

Information on all courses at Purdue is available at mypurdue.purdue.edu.

CHM 11500: General Chemistry: Stoichiometry; atomic structure; periodic properties; ionic and covalent bonding; molecular geometry; gases, liquids, and solids; crystal structure; thermochemistry; descriptive chemistry of metals and non-metals. Required of students majoring in science and students in engineering who are not in CHM 12300. One year of high school chemistry or one semester of college chemistry required.

CHM 11600: General Chemistry: A continuation of CHM 11500. Solutions; quantitative equilibria in aqueous solution; introductory thermodynamics; oxidation-reduction and electrochemistry; chemical kinetics; qualitative analysis; further descriptive chemistry of metals and nonmetals.

CS 15900: Programming Applications for Engineers: Fundamental principles, concepts, and methods of programming (C and MATLAB), with emphasis on applications in the physical sciences and engineering. Basic problem solving and programming techniques; fundamental algorithms and data structures; and use of programming logic in solving engineering problems. Students are expected to complete assignments in a collaborative learning environment. 

ENGR 13100: Transforming Ideas to Innovation I: A partnership between Schools and Programs within the College of Engineering, introduces students to the engineering professions using multidisciplinary, societally relevant content. Developing engineering approaches to systems, generating and exploring creative ideas, and use of quantitative methods to support design decisions. Explicit model-development activities (engineering eliciting activities, EEAs) engage students in innovative thinking across the engineering disciplines at Purdue. Experiencing the process of design and analysis in engineering including how to work effectively in teams. Developing skills in project management, engineering fundamentals, oral and graphical communication, logical thinking, and modern engineering tools (e.g., Excel and MATLAB). 

ENGR 13200: Transforming Ideas to Innovation II: A partnership between Schools and Programs within the College of Engineering continues building on the foundation developed in ENGR 13100. Students take a more in depth and holistic approach to integrating multiple disciplines perspectives while constructing innovative engineering solutions to open-ended problems. Extending skills in project management, engineering fundamentals, oral and graphical communication, logical thinking, team work, and modern engineering tools (e.g., Excel and MATLAB). 

ENGR 13300: Transforming Ideas to Innovation, EPICS: Introduces students to the engineering professions using multidisciplinary, societally relevant content. Students will develop engineering approaches to systems, generate and explore creative ideas, and use quantitative methods to support design decisions. Students will experience the process of design and analysis in engineering including how to work effectively in teams, and will develop skills in project management, engineering fundamentals, oral and graphical communication, logical thinking, and modern engineering tools (e.g., Excel and MATLAB). An emphasis will be placed on computing logic development and builds upon the co-requisite experience of the students in the EPICS class.

MA 16100: Plane Analytic Geometry and Calculus I: (5 credits) Introduction to differential and integral calculus of one variable, with applications. Some schools or departments may allow only 4 credit hours toward graduation for this course. Designed for students who have not had at least a one-semester calculus course in high school, with a grade of "A" or "B". Not open to students with credit in MA 16500. Demonstrated competence in college algebra and trigonometry.

MA 16200: Plane Analytic Geometry and Calculus II: (5 credits) Continuation of MA 16100. Vectors in two and three dimensions, techniques of integration, infinite series, conic sections, polar coordinates, surfaces in three dimensions. Some schools or departments may allow only 4 credit hours toward graduation for this course.

MA 16500: Analytic Geometry and Calculus I: (4 credits) Introduction to differential and integral calculus of one variable, with applications. Conic sections. Designed for students who have had at least a one-semester calculus course in high school, with a grade of "A" or "B", but are not qualified to enter MA 16200 or 16600, or the advanced placement courses MA 17300 or 27100, or the honors calculus course MA 18100. Demonstrated competence in college algebra and trigonometry.

MA 16600: Analytic Geometry and Calculus II:(4 credits) Continuation of MA 16500. Vectors in two and three dimensions. Techniques of integration, infinite series, polar coordinates, surfaces in three dimensions. Not open to students with credit in MA 16200.

PHYS 17200: Modern Mechanics: Introductory calculus-based physics course using fundamental interactions between atoms to describe Newtonian mechanics, conservation laws, energy quantization, entropy, the kinetic theory of gases, and related topics in mechanics and thermodynamics. Emphasis is on using only a few fundamental principles to describe physical phenomena extending from nuclei to galaxies. 3-D graphical simulations and numerical problem solving by computer are employed by the student from the very beginning.