Skip navigation

Transportation and Society

DESIGN OF EDUCATIONAL MATERIAL & PUBLIC AWARENESS CAMPAIGNS FOR IMPROVING WORK ZONE DRIVER SAFETY

Sponsored by the Indiana Department of Transportation (INDOT)

Work zones present unique hazards to drivers as they often contain variable conditions or reduce the usable pavement area.  However, the most common type of work zone crash occurs before the work area itself, in the advance warning area; the rear-end back of queue crash, in which a moving vehicle hits the end of a stopped line of traffic.  Driver inattention is considered to be the most common reason for these types of crashes.  As back of queue warning systems already exist, this project will focus on trying to modify driver behavior through educational materials and public awareness campaigns focusing on work zone safety.

Completed May 2022

For more information, contact:

Ricardo Chahine

PUBLIC ACCEPTANCE OF INDOT'S TRANSPORTATION SERVICES

Sponsored by the Indiana Department of Transportation (INDOT)

The Indiana Department of Transportation (INDOT) conducts a biennial customer satisfaction survey in order to obtain feedback from Hoosier taxpayers about their satisfaction with INDOT's management of Indiana's state-owned highways.  While this survey captures general public opinion, it does not attempt to understand whether the public understands why INDOT makes specific traffic and safety related improvements to their highway network.  The goal of this project is to survey the public to gain insight into their awareness, understanding, perception and acceptance of INDOT's transportation system improvements.  The information gathered from the survey will inform INDOT's transportation decision making processes and their communication strategies to allow better connection with the public.

Completed December 2020

RIDESHARING, ACTIVE TRAVEL BEHAVIOR, AND PERSONAL HEALTH: IMPLICATIONS FOR SHARED AUTONOMOUS VEHICLES

Sponsored by the Center for Connected and Autonomous Vehicles (CCAT)

Autonomous vehicles (AVs) have been argued to have both positive and negative impacts on public health.  Most important benefits relate to a reduction of injuries and fatalities from traffic crashes, and decrease in pollutant emissions.  On the other hand, AVs can limit opportunities for daily activity and associated health benefits.  Additionally, if the adoption of this technology is not properly planned, it could likely lead to increases in vehicle-miles traveled (VMT) as AVs may provide mobility for those too young to drive, the elderly and the disabled.  This would result in both reduced physical activity and increased air pollution, leading to non-communicable diseases, which are responsible for two-third of all deaths globally.  Although there has been much research on the safety impacts of AVs, the potential implications of AVs on active travel behavior and personal health outcomes such as physical activity and obesity rates are not well understood to date.  This project will assess the relationship between ridesharing (as a proxy for shared travel behavior), and active travel behavior (often measured as the number of trips made by walking or biking), and identify personal health-related outcomes expected due to the adoption of shared AVs (SAVs). Strategies to better capitalize the benefits and mitigate the adverse impacts that this technology could bring will also be offered.

Completed 2021

PUBLIC ACCEPTANCE AND SOCIO-ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF SHARED AUTONOMOUS VEHICLES: IMPLICATIONS FOR POLICY AND PLANNING

Sponsored by the Center for Connected and Autonomous Vehicles (CCAT)

Through funding awarded by USDOT Center for Connected and Automated Transportation (CCAT) the objective of the proposed work is twofold. Firstly, to investigate the public acceptance towards shared autonomous vehicles (SAVs) by assessing the intention to switch from public transportation in favor of ride-sharing services operated by autonomous vehicles using survey data from two cities in the Midwest (Indianapolis, IN and Chicago, IL). Secondly, to conduct a socio-economic analysis, using the results of market segmentation analysis for the two study areas, to inform policy and planning decisions. Lastly, a comparison of the results of the analysis in Indianapolis, IN and the results in Chicago, IL will be conducted, in order to provide recommendations and practical feedback to planners, government and private companies that can lead to policy-making decisions and the deployment of a pathway for SAVs.

Completed 2020

LIGHT RAIL TRANSIT AND HOUSING MARKETS IN CHARLOTTE-MECKLENBURG COUNTY, NORTH CAROLINA: ANNOUNCEMENT AND OPERATIONS EFFECTS USING QUASI-EXPERIMENTAL METHODS

As planners and engineers in large cities around the United States continue to seek solutions to transportation-related problems such as congestion, greenhouse gas emissions, and safe and efficient access to goods and services, light rail transit (LRT) systems have become an increasingly popular option. this study examines the effects that LRT has had on the single-family residence housing market in Charlotte-Mecklenburg, North Carolina, in both the announcement and operations phases.

This work is part of Yue Ke's doctoral dissertation, still a work in progress.

LOW INCOME, SUPERMARKET ACCESSIBILITY, AND THE TRANSPORTATION NETWORK: A MULTIMODAL ANALYSIS IDENTIFYING AREAS OF POOR ACCESSIBILITY AND INTERVENTION STRATEGIES IN INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA

The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Economic Research Service estimates that 23.5 million people live in food deserts, over half of which are considered low-income residents. Accurately defining a food desert is crucial as the designated areas can benefit from grant opportunities and funding priority. To qualify as an urban food desert, the USDA requires that at least 500 residents or one-third of the population live outside a one-mile buffer from a supermarket as well as have a median income of less than 80% of the area average or a poverty rate of greater than 20%...

Completed 2015