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Center for Connected and Automated Transportation (CCAT)

The Center for Connected and Automated Transportation was created at the University of Michigan along with several university partners, including Purdue University.  CCAT aims to advance research in the field of transportation safety, mobility, and sustainability via connected vehicles, connected infrastructure, and autonomous vehicles.  CCAT is funded by the U.S. DOT through its University Transportation Centers (UTC) program. In addition to Purdue University, the University of Michigan has partnered with Washtenaw Community College, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of Akron, and Central State University. 

Purdue University's involvement with CCAT extends well beyond the work done by the Sustainable Transportation Systems Research Group.    This page serves to highlight our contributions to the CCAT effort. 

For more information about CCAT, including additional projects, follow this link to the main CCAT page, hosted by the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute.

THE IMPACT OF COVID-19 ON USER PERCEPTIONS OF PUBLIC TRANSIT, SHARED MOBILITY/MICRO-MOBILITY SERVICES, AND EMERGING VEHICLE TYPES

The objective of this project is to investigate the impact of COVID-19 on user perceptions of public transit, shared mobility services, and emerging vehicle types (electric, connected, and autonomous vehicles). As transportation systems remain at the forefront of the COVID-19 pandemic, it is critical to examine the transportation trends and behaviors of shared modes’ and emerging vehicle types’ users to best plan for transportation policies in the long-run. We propose to conduct user surveys and behavioral experiments in select communities with different levels of transit and smart mobility usage [Indianapolis (low), Salt Lake City(medium), and Chicago (heavy)] to assess user perceptions for public transit, emerging technologies such as ridesharing, electric vehicles, and micro-mobility services in the COVID era. The impacts of the pandemic on user perceptions for public transit, shared mobility/micro-mobility services, and emerging vehicle types will be discussed followed by the corresponding planning/policy implications on transportation system utilization. This project will be of interest to the research community, transit operators, shared mobility and micro-mobility services operators, and other transportation professionals to help them gain a better understanding of the impacts of the pandemic on user perceptions for public transit, shared mobility, and micro-mobility services.

Ongoing - Est. Completion Date Jan. 28 2022

For more information, contact:

Ricardo Chahine

RIDESHARING, ACTIVE TRAVEL BEHAVIOR, AND PERSONAL HEALTH: IMPLICATIONS FOR SHARED AUTONOMOUS VEHICLES

Autonomous vehicles (AVs) have been argued to have both positive and negative impacts on public health.  Most important benefits relate to a reduction of injuries and fatalities from traffic crashes, and decrease in pollutant emissions.  On the other hand, AVs can limit opportunities for daily activity and associated health benefits.  Additionally, if the adoption of this technology is not properly planned, it could likely lead to increases in vehicle-miles traveled (VMT) as AVs may provide mobility for those too young to drive, the elderly and the disabled.  This would result in both reduced physical activity and increased air pollution, leading to non-communicable diseases, which are responsible for two-third of all deaths globally.  Although there has been much research on the safety impacts of AVs, the potential implications of AVs on active travel behavior and personal health outcomes such as physical activity and obesity rates are not well understood to date.  This project will assess the relationship between ridesharing (as a proxy for shared travel behavior), and active travel behavior (often measured as the number of trips made by walking or biking), and identify personal health-related outcomes expected due to the adoption of shared AVs (SAVs). Strategies to better capitalize the benefits and mitigate the adverse impacts that this technology could bring will also be offered.

Ongoing - Est. Completion Date Dec. 31 2020

For more information, contact:

Lisa Losada

Conference Abstract: Active Travel in the Autonomous Vehicles' Era, NARSC 2019

 

PUBLIC ACCEPTANCE AND SOCIO-ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF SHARED AUTONOMOUS VEHICLES: IMPLICATIONS FOR POLICY AND PLANNING

Through funding awarded by USDOT Center for Connected and Automated Transportation (CCAT) the objective of the proposed work is twofold. Firstly, to investigate the public acceptance towards shared autonomous vehicles (SAVs) by assessing the intention to switch from public transportation in favor of ride-sharing services operated by autonomous vehicles using survey data from two cities in the Midwest (Indianapolis, IN and Chicago, IL). Secondly, to conduct a socio-economic analysis, using the results of market segmentation analysis for the two study areas, to inform policy and planning decisions. Lastly, a comparison of the results of the analysis in Indianapolis, IN and the results in Chicago, IL will be conducted, in order to provide recommendations and practical feedback to planners, government and private companies that can lead to policy-making decisions and the deployment of a pathway for SAVs.

Completed 2019

For more information, contact:

Lisa Losada

Conference Abstract: Potential Implications of Autonomous Vehicles on Personal Vehicle Ownership and Demand for Public Transit, ASCE Transportation and Development 2019

Conference Abstract: Assessing the Socio-Economic Implications Related to the Emergence of Shared Autonomous Vehicles, ASCE Transportation and Development 2019

Conference Abstract: Socio-Economic Implications Related to the Emergence of Shared Autonomous Vehicles: The Tale of Two Midwestern Cities, ITE Great Lakes District Meeting 2019

Brochure: Public Acceptance and Socio-Economic Analysis of Shared Autonomous Vehicles: Implications for Policy and Planning

BEHAVIORAL INTENTION TO RIDE IN AN AUTONOMOUS VEHICLE AND IMPLICATIONS ON MODE CHOICE DECISIONS, ENERGY USE AND EMISSIONS

The project was awarded under USDOT Center for Connected and Automated Transportation (CCAT) and the objective is to examine the potential effects of automation on energy demand and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from vehicles. To achieve this, improved projections of future travel demand and patterns in response to autonomous vehicles (AVs) will be obtained using a behavioral experiment (survey), and the energy and carbon intensity of vehicle travel will be estimated. A stated-preference survey is designed and distributed in Indianapolis, IN to assess the behavioral intention to ride in AVs and investigate the attributes which impact people’s opinion as their preferred mode of transportation in the short and long run. Lastly, the energy and environmental implications due to the emergence of AVs will be evaluated.

Completed 2019

For more information, contact:

Lisa Losada

Related Paper: What have we learned? A review of stated preference and choice studies on autonomous vehicles.

Conference Abstract: Assessing the Energy and Environmental Implications Due to the Emergence of Autonomous Vehicles, ISMT 2019

Conference Abstract: Assessing the Behavioral Intention to Ride in Autonomous and Shared Autonomous Vehicles and Market Segmentation Analysis, IATBR 2018

   

 

Lisa Losada