BLOCKS

Tutorials

Q: How do I add curated news?

What do I need?

What do I do?

What should I see?
In this example, the persistent list has two URLs.

Q: How do I add dynamic news?

What do I need?

What do I do?

What should I see?
In this example, the most recently published event documents with "-web" images in container.getRoot().Engr.AboutUs.News.Spotlights['2018'] are displayed.

Q: How do I add tagged news?

What do I need?

What do I do?

What should I see?
In this example, the most recently published event documents tagged as "Research" and with "-web" images are displayed.

Q: How do I add "manual" wide news?

What do I need?

What do I do?

What should I see?
In this example, a URL of 'https://engineering.purdue.edu/Engr/AboutUs/News/Spotlights/2018/first-lillian-gilbreth-postdoctoral-fellows-honored' has been manually entered. The story will show no more than 1000 characters from the body.

Bringing 'space trash' safely back to Earth

Talk about space junk. Orbital debris from spacecraft, the defunct satellites and fragments of spent rockets left suspended in Earth’s atmosphere, are slowly making their way back to Earth. Objects usually return after a few years, but debris trapped in higher orbits can remain for more than a century.

Purdue University’s David Spencer, associate professor of aeronautics and astronautics, aims to develop a system that in the future would deorbit spacecraft launched by companies like SpaceX, OneWeb, and Boeing, as the spacecraft complete their missions. A space junk animation is available here.

Why is this important?

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Q: How do I add curated wide news?

What do I need?

What do I do?

What should I see?
In this example, the first two URLs in our plCurated_News persistent list are displayed. The top story will show no more than 1200 characters from the body. The bottom story will show no more than 1000 characters from the body.

Bringing 'space trash' safely back to Earth

Talk about space junk. Orbital debris from spacecraft, the defunct satellites and fragments of spent rockets left suspended in Earth’s atmosphere, are slowly making their way back to Earth. Objects usually return after a few years, but debris trapped in higher orbits can remain for more than a century.

Purdue University’s David Spencer, associate professor of aeronautics and astronautics, aims to develop a system that in the future would deorbit spacecraft launched by companies like SpaceX, OneWeb, and Boeing, as the spacecraft complete their missions. A space junk animation is available here.

Why is this important?

“There are a number of high-value orbits that have become so populated with defunct satellites and debris spacecraft that they’re approaching a tipping point,” Spencer said. “Once that tipping point is reached, a cascade of uncontrolled collisions can occur, rendering the orbit unusable. And into the mix the thousands of satellites that companies plan to launch into orbit in the next several years, and the problem becomes much worse.”

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First Lillian Gilbreth Postdoctoral Fellows Honored

Five of the world’s most promising young engineering scholars have been honored by Purdue Engineering as inaugural recipients of the prestigious Lillian Gilbreth Postdoctoral Fellowship in recognition of their outstanding scholarly achievements and proposed innovative interdisciplinary research and its potential for broad impact on industry and society.

More than 100 applicants with recently awarded PhDs from top institutions around the world were considered for these awards.

The men and women come from the mechanical; chemical; environmental and ecological; materials; electrical; and biomedical engineering disciplines and were installed as Lillian Gilbreth Postdoctoral Fellows at an event celebrating Dr. Gilbreth’s distinguished career on November 9, 2018. Rikky Muller, assistant professor at the University of California at Berkeley and 2017 National Academy of Engineering Gilbreth Lecturer, was the keynote speaker.

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Q: How do I add dynamic wide news?

What do I need?

What do I do?

What should I see?
In this example, the most recently published event documents with "-web" images in container.getRoot().Engr.AboutUs.News.Spotlights['2018'] are displayed.

Engineering’s Undergraduate Research Office to Open in January

An increasing demand from incoming Purdue Engineering undergraduates for research experience and a societal trend towards students seeking technological solutions for global challenges has led to the creation of the College of Engineering’s new Office for Undergraduate Research. The office opens in January and will centralize opportunities for student research experiences.

The office will expand on the College’s Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship Program (SURF) launched in 2003. It will offer a portfolio of research opportunities for students of all levels throughout the academic year, and will be directed by Dean’s Fellow John Howarter, an associate professor of Materials Engineering and of Environmental and Ecological Engineering.

“In the last five years, many students have come in with significant research experience as high school students, and some want to get into research in their second year,” says Melba Crawford, associate dean for Research, professor of Civil Engineering, professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, and professor of Agronomy. Crawford spearheaded the new office with Eckhard Groll, associate dean for Undergraduate and Graduate Education and the Reilly Professor of Mechanical Engineering.

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Living on Mars: Purdue team to lead simulation facility mission

The air may be breathable and the location is on planet Earth, but for two weeks a multidisciplinary team of Purdue students and alumni will eat, sleep, work and live like they’re on Mars.

For the second consecutive year, a Purdue team will undergo a mission at the Mars Desert Research Station facility in Utah, conducting a number of experiments and living life as though stationed on the fourth planet from the sun.

Cesare Guariniello, crew geologist on last year’s Boilers2Mars team, is team commander this year and an aspiring astronaut. He said improving technical expertise and knowledge is only part of the preparation to travel one day to the red planet.

“It is much more difficult to test oneself in the psychological and social aspects,” said Guariniello, a 2016 School of Aeronautics and Astronautics doctoral program alumnus and current research associate. “Participation in at the Mars Desert Research Station gives the team a chance to get as close as possible to an actual mission in space, with a good amount of realism.”

The six-member team was selected by Purdue MARS (Mars Activities and Research Society) to take part in the simulation mission. The team, called MartianMakers, will take over control of the research station on the evening of Dec. 30 and pass it on to the next team on Jan. 12.

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Q: How do I add tagged wide news?

What do I need?

What do I do?

What should I see?
In this example, the most recently published event documents tagged as "Research" and with "-web" images are displayed.

BME's Goergen, ME's Lin receive $3.6M in NIH funding to improve prediction of heart disease progression in pediatric patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy

Craig Goergen, the Leslie A. Geddes Professor at the Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, is principal investigator on the $3.6 million grant.

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IE/BME's Brad Duerstock, collaborators to develop medical device with DOD funding

Bradley Duerstock, professor of practice in the School of Industrial Engineering and the Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, and his collaborators at the Indiana University School of Medicine have received a $1.5 million Translational Research Award from the U.S. Department of Defense.

Bradley Duerstock, professor of practice in the School of Industrial Engineering and the Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, and his collaborators at the Indiana University School of Medicine have received a $1.5 million Translational Research Award from the U.S. Department of Defense.

The award will fund research to further develop a patent-pending physiological monitoring device for autonomic dysreflexia (AD), a life-threatening condition that usually develops after a spinal cord injury at or above the T6 vertebra. The device detects AD non-invasively using sensors and a controller. It measures the heart's electrical activity, skin nerve activity, galvanic skin response and skin temperature.

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