TraVERSE Research Opportunities

How to apply:

1

Abigail Engelberth (aengelbe@purdue.edu)

ABE/EEE
Abigail Engelberth

Research Interests

Separations to recover valuable products from underutilized resources, waste streams, and renewable resources. Specific expertise in liquid-liquid extraction and chromatography. Experience with anaerobic digestion and fermentative processes.

Topics of Potential Projects

Use of inverse chromatography to evaluate the competitive binding potential of heavy metals on lignin.

Use of molecular modeling to evaluate lignin-analog compounds for their affinity to various metal ions.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Experience with chromatography is preferred. Background in biological or chemical engineering.

2

Adrian Buganza Tepole (abuganza@purdue.edu)

ME
Adrian Buganza Tepole

Research Interests

Soft tissue mechanics, modeling and experiments.

Soft actuators and machines, modeling and experiments

Topics of Potential Projects

Skin growth in response to stretch: tissue expanders are balloon-like devices inserted under the skin and inflated gradually over a period of weeks. As the expanders inflate, skin is stretched and grows. My group works on animal models of tissue expansion, and computational models to recreate the deformation and growth of the skin. The goal is to understand how, qualitatively, skin grows in response to stretch, in order to improve reconstructive surgery.

Soft robotic design for training human gait: exposing older adults to different perturbations can improve their balance and motor response, preventing falls. In order to apply controlled perturbations to older adults we are developing the next generation 'gait-lab' in which soft machines are used to interact with individuals.

Optimization of reconstructive surgery using hybrid mechanistic-machine learning algorithms: mechanical stress leads to complications such as tissue damage or fibrosis. However, surgical plans are still based on physician experience. We are collecting data from actual surgeries (deformation from 3D photo, mechanical properties from non-invasive measurements) to determine how stress/deformation is linked to our wound complication index.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Computational mechanics experience is required. Ideally experience with one of the common finite element packages such as Abaqus.

Additional Python, C++, or similar programming language is desired.

128

Albert Heber (heber@purdue.edu)

ABE
Albert Heber

Research Interests

Agricultural air quality. Measurement and modeling of emissions of ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, particulate matter (PM), greenhouse gases, and odor from livestock buildings. Building environmental control systems. Downwind odor concentration measurement and dispersion modeling.

Topics of Potential Projects

  1. Analysis of livestock building environmental and air quality data from the National Air Emissions Monitoring Study for dairy, swine, broiler chicken or layer hens.
  2. Modeling of livestock building environment and air quality and emissions.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

  1. B.S. in engineering discipline.
  2. Proven interest in livestock building engineering
3

Alejandro Strachan (strachan@purdue.edu)

MSE
Alejandro H Strachan

Research Interests

Prof. Strachan’s research focuses on the development of predictive atomistic and molecular simulation methodologies to describe materials from first principles and their application to problems of technological importance in conjunction with data science tools. Application areas of interest include: coupled electronic, chemical and thermo-mechanical processes in devices of interest for nanoelectronics and energy as well as polymers and their composites, molecular solids and active materials, including shape memory and high-energy density materials.

Topics of Potential Projects

Refractory complex concentrated alloys (RCCAs), also know as high-entropy alloys, are a new class of materials with an enormous potential for high-temperature structural applications. These alloys exhibit high-temperature strength surpassing Ni superalloys, the current state-of-the-art, but, unfortunately, their corrosion resistance is far from ideal. You will join a project that seeks to optimize the composition of RCCAs to achieve an unsurpassed combination of strength and oxidation resistance at high-temperatures. These properties would enable the realization of rotation detonation engines for hypersonic vehicles of interest in national defense and a significant reduction in fuel consumption and pollution over the lifetime of a land-based gas turbines that power the electric grid. You will perform first principles simulations and use machine learning to develop models to guide experimental efforts to synthesize and test new CCAs.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Background in materials science, physics or chemistry is required, together with basic programing experience. Experience with electronic structure calculations, atomistic simulations, or machine learning is desirable,

4

Alexander Kildishev (kildishev@purdue.edu)

ECE
Alexander Kildishev

Research Interests

computational nanophotonics; optical metasurfaces; optical elements and systems for neuromorphic computing; topological and AI-based optimization in photonics;

Topics of Potential Projects

topics of a potential project will be discussed individually and tailored depending on the skillset, background, and the future plans of the applicant

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Sufficient background in physical optics, mathematical physics; good command with Python, C++, Matlab. Good working knowledge of either Lumerical or Comsol is highly desirable. Some initial knowledge of the ML and/or topology optimization concepts is desirable.

5

Alexandra Boltasseva (aeb@purdue.edu)

ECE
Alexandra Boltasseva

Research Interests

Photonics, nanotechnology, quantum information science and technology, deep machine learning

Topics of Potential Projects

- Artificial intelligence assisted photonic technologies

- Quantum Nanophotonics

- Machine learning for photonic design and quantum measurements

- Optical metamaterials and metasurfaces

- Nano-optics and plasmonics

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Solid state, optics of solids, electromagnetism, numerical simulations and/or optical characterization and/or nano fabrication (not required)

6

Alina Alexeenko (alexeenk@purdue.edu)

AAE
Alina Alexeenko

Research Interests

Rarefied gas dynamics, numerical methods for Boltzmann equation, direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) and particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collisions (PIC/MCC); high- altitude aerothermodynamic, micropropulsion and smallsat technologies; MEMS sensors and actuators; nonequilibrium microplasma; vacuum gas dynamics; lyophilization/freeze- drying for bio/pharmaceutical manufacturing

Topics of Potential Projects

* microcombustion to enable compact power generation with energy densities x10 of batteries

* spacecraft swarm technologies and spaceflight testing including spacecraft micropropulsion for extreme proximity operation

* rarefied flow and thermal transport in application to aerothermodynamics and lyophilization

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Depends on the project. I will consider a wide range of backgrounds in Aerospace, Chemical, Mechanical and Electrical/Computer Eng.

7

Aly El Gamal (elgamala@purdue.edu)

ECE
Aly El Gamal

Research Interests

Machine Learning, with emphasis on Deep Learning algorithms and general theoretical analysis.

Information Theory, with emphasis on wireless communications and adversarial machine learning theoretical frameworks.

Data Science for sports applications, with emphasis on players' healthcare.

Topics of Potential Projects

Using machine learning for wireless communication systems with emphasis on intelligent collaborative spectrum access and interference management. Tasks include source identification, analyzing peer behavior, and context understanding.

Empirical analysis of adversarial deep learning.

Information theoretic approaches to adversarial machine learning.

Machine learning for wireless network security.

Data analysis for soccer players' wearable for promoting physical wellness in training sessions.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Familiarity with machine learning (and preferably wireless communications) concepts.

Familiarity with Tensorflow or PyTorch.

Please check course material and projects for background: https://web.ics.purdue.edu/~elgamala/ECE595/index.html

8

Amy Marconnet (marconnet@purdue.edu)

ME
Amy Marconnet

Research Interests

Thermal transport and energy conversion including thermal energy storage, batteries, electronics cooling, nanoscale thermal transport phenomena, etc.

Topics of Potential Projects

Hands-on experimental projects related to:

+ Embedded phase change material-based cooling for electronic devices

+ Thermal interface materials and high conductivity substrates for electronics cooling

+ Thermal transport in lithium ion batteries

+ Metal hydrides for heat storage

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

+ one or more of the following (or similar) classes: thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, and/or heat transfer

+ experience with some programming language is helpful (e.g. matlab, python, etc.)

9

Andrea Vacca (avacca@purdue.edu)

ME/ABE
Andrea Vacca

Research Interests

hydraulic control systems, fluid power component modeling and design

Topics of Potential Projects

1. simulation of the lubricating film of positive displacement machines; 2. modeling of the noise generation and transfer path in hydraulic components; 3. novel electro-hydraulic solutions to increase controllability and energy efficiency of fluid power applications; 4. diagnostics and prognostics of fluid power components

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

MS degree in Mechanical Engineering or Aerospace Engineering or Mechatronic Engineering

10

Andres Arrieta (aarrieta@purdue.edu)

ME
Andres Arrieta

Research Interests

Morphing structures

Metamaterials

Nonlinear Dynamics

Soft Robotics

Smart Materials

Topics of Potential Projects

Selective Stiffness in Morphing Structures via Embedded Bistable Elements: Compliance based morphing structures suppose a difficult design challenge necessitating systems capable to exhibit concurrently high stiffness and directional compliance to fulfill the dual problem of carrying loads while enabling large deformability. The objective of this project is to address the trade-off at the heart of morphing structures by producing inherently shape adaptable structures based on the generally applicable principle of elastic pre-straining.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Finite elements analysis, optimization, nonlinear dynamics

11

Andrew Weiner (amw@purdue.edu)

ECE
Andrew Weiner

Research Interests

Optics and photonics: optical signal processing, including both classical and quantum applications

Topics of Potential Projects

The Ultrafast Optics and Fiber Communications Laboratory investigates broadband photonic signal processing, including research involving optical pulse shaping, integrated photonics technologies, frequency combs, hybrid photonic - radio frequency systems, and entangled photons.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Some experience in optics and photonics, as well as basic laboratory and computer interfacing skills, preferred.

12

Andrew Whelton (awhelton@purdue.edu)

CE/EEE
Andrew Whelton

Research Interests

Environmental chemistry; Infrastructure rehabilitation; Plastics; Plumbing; Environmental health; Disasters; Water quality

Topics of Potential Projects

Please visit Dr. Whelton's Google Scholar page for more information.https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=dBy5drAAAAAJ&hl=en&oi=ao

INITIATIVE 1 – Disasters Science: Critical Infrastructure and Emergency Incidents. One of our goals is to develop new knowledge and enable communities to better detect, respond to, and recover from disasters that affect critical infrastructure. We work to understand knowledge-gaps and fundamental processes that control environmental and infrastructure contamination and recovery processes. Infrastructure contamination, decontamination, public health risks, bottled water, household needs, chemical spill environmental impacts and recovery, and more. Visit www.PlumbingSafety.org for information about some of our many projects in this area.

INTIATIVE 2 – Infrastructure Rehabilitation Technologies: Environmental and Human Health Impacts. Because of the enormous need for water infrastructure repair in the U.S. and our team’s direct experience in plastics, we have been active in assisting the utility and transportation sectors understand infrastructure rehabilitation methods. Visit www.CIPPSafety.org for information about some of our many projects in this area.

INITIATIVE 3 – Water Quality and Infrastructure Performance. Chemical, microbiological, and aesthetic drinking water quality impacts caused by drinking water plumbing components has been another core focus. Our work involves studies conducted at inhabited homes as well as at the bench- and pilot-scales. Visit www.PlumbingSafety.org for information about some of our many projects in this area.

INTIATIVE 4 – Emerging Materials for Infrastructure and Environmental Applications. Much of our early work has focused on identifying technological problems that increase human health and environmental risks. In recent years, however, several activities have focused on improving existing or developing new technologies to address these challenges. These included carbon nanofiber composites, decontamination agents for plumbing, slag use applications, and more. Please visit Dr. Whelton’s Google Scholar page for more information.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Background of chemistry, biology, engineering, or other relevant discipline.

13

Anter El-Azab (aelazab@purdue.edu)

MSE
Anter El-Azab

Research Interests

Computational materials science and mechanics.

Topics of Potential Projects

Molecular dynamics simulation of micro-scale plasticity of structural alloys

Lattice thermal transport simulation in defective crystals

Recrystallization and grain growth simulations

Continuum dislocation dynamics modeling of mesoscale deformation and fracture

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Students with good background in materials science, mechanics, and mathematics.

14

Antonio Bobet (bobet@purdue.edu)

CE
Antonio Bobet

Research Interests

Rock Mechanics; Fracture Mechanics; Ground-Structure Interaction; Underground Structures; Wave Propagation through Fractured Media; Lunar Lava Tubes

Topics of Potential Projects

Stability of Lunar Lava Tubes; Detection of Damage through Geophysical Methods; Seismic Stability of Underground Structures

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Excellent background in Geomechanics, Numerical Methods and Problem Solving.

15

Arezoo M Ardekani (ardekani@purdue.edu)

ME
Arezoo Ardekani

Research Interests

Fluid mechanics, biological flows, microfluidics, soft matter, active fluids, transport fluid, complex fluids

Topics of Potential Projects

Prof. Ardekani has established a unique multidisciplinary research program on biological flows and complex fluids. Using a combination of state-of-the-art computations, theoretical analysis, and experiments, our research advances understanding of the transport of particles and microorganism in density stratified environments found in oceans and lakes, the interaction of microbes with fluid flow and their surrounding fluids, and flow through porous media. Our goal is to advance knowledge and develop solutions in biological, biomedical and health care systems, environmental remediation and energy production.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Microfluidics and microscopy OR computational fluid dynamics, numerical analysis

16

Barrett Caldwell (bscaldwell@purdue.edu)

IE
Barrett Caldwell

Research Interests

Prof. Caldwell's research team is the Group Performance Environments Research (GROUPER) Laboratory. GROUPER examines and improves how people get, share, and use information well in settings including aviation, critical incident response, healthcare, and spaceflight operations. Prof. Caldwell has extended the well-established concept of human supervisory control to consider a broader range of knowledge and task coordination among distributed experts and even intelligent software agents. This conceptual extension, known as distributed supervisory coordination, allows for a more powerful description and modeling of human scale interactions as well as multiple dimensions of expertise and task coordination

Topics of Potential Projects

GROUPER research consists of "streams," or coordinated areas of project activity. There are two styles of stream organization: "Applications" or "Theoretical". A particular project may focus primarily on a specific application domain, or a specific theoretical issue, or a combination. More information may be found at: https://engineering.purdue.edu/GrouperLab/streams/

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

A variety of potential student interests and skills can be supported. Primary emphases include a background in human factors engineering; industrial and systems engineering; cognitive or social psychology; user experience / user interaction design; or information architecture design.

126

Borja Peleato (bpeleato@purdue.edu)

ECE
Borja Peleato-Inarrea

Research Interests

Coded Caching

Wireless communications

Error correcting codes

Topics of Potential Projects

Project 1: Design caching schemes specifying what information should be stored in each node of a communications network, so as to take advantage of multicasting opportunities when the network is congested. Several factors to consider are how the information is stored at the source (single vs multiple servers), the distribution of requests from the end users, and the network topology.

Project 2: Dynamic spectrum management across multiple heterogeneous networks with limited interaction between them. There is a potential to experiment with machine learning techniques if the student has some background in the area. Data from the Spectrum Collaboration Challenge is available. This problem could be addressed from a theoretical perspective (e.g., information theory), or from a practical perspective, designing heuristic algorithms.

Project 3: Modern wireless networks rely heavily on feedback channels to adjust several transmission parameters, such as code rate, beamforming, synchronization, retransmissions, etc. This project would study the performance limits of such communication networks under severe capacity limitations on the feedback channel. This problem could be addressed from a theoretical perspective (e.g., information theory), or from a practical perspective, designing heuristic algorithms.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Basic background in Information Theory (understanding of capacity, entropy and information)

Undergraduate level experience in Matlab or Python programming Good domain of the English or Spanish language

99

Brandon Boor (bboor@purdue.edu)

CE
Brandon Boor

Research Interests

Aerosol science, physics and chemistry of indoor air, HVAC filtration, human exposure assessment, nanoaerosols, bioaerosols, new particle formation, aerosol measurement techniques, fate & transport of VOCs/SVOCs, urban air pollution, low-cost air quality monitoring, building ventilation, and health effects of air pollution.

Topics of Potential Projects

We are studying indoor air chemistry and the factors that influence the chemical composition of indoor air. We use state-of-the-art instruments such as proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry to probe the dynamics of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in indoor air. We are also investigating the formation and growth of nano-sized aerosols by measuring particles as small as a single nanometer. A recent video on our research can be found here: https://www.purdue.edu/newsroom/releases/2019/Q4/how-much-are-you-polluting-your-office-air-just-by-existing.html

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Preferred experience: familiarity with analytical equipment (e.g. mass spectrometry) and aerosol instrumentation; data processing and analysis in Matlab or similar.

124

Brett Savoie (bsavoie@purdue.edu)

ChE
Brett Savoie

Research Interests

Our group develops methods for simulating and designing soft materials. We are interested in problems related to electronic and ionic transport as well as machine learning approaches that work in data scarce applications.

Topics of Potential Projects

I am offering a project related to developing force field potentials for molecular simulations from first principles calculations. This project is part of a larger effort within the group to automate the development of force-fields, especially for addressing new chemistries that are unrepresented in existing approaches. As part of this project, the student would learn and extend our methodology to include many-body interactions and reactive potentials.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

-Strong programming experience (preferably at least python or a low-level language).

-Previous experience in molecular dynamics simulations (optional)

17

Bryan Boudouris (boudouris@purdue.edu)

ChE
Bryan Boudouris

Research Interests

Organic Electronics

Polymer Chemistry

Polymer Physics

Topics of Potential Projects

We have projects that include the design of new macromolecules and their implementation in bioelectronic devices, thin film organic electronic devices, thermoelectric devices, membrane separations, and sensor platforms.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

A passion for polymer science and engineering and/or organic electronics.

18

Bumsoo Han (bumsoo@purdue.edu)

ME
Bumsoo Han

Research Interests

My group's research aims to engineer "live" devices with biological cells for understanding physio- and patho-biology, drug discovery and precision medicines. We are developing and using microfluidics, 3D printing and quantitative microscopy techniques. We also perform theoretical and computational research to understand the behavior of soft materials.

Topics of Potential Projects

Current research focuses on pancreatic normal and cancer models using microfluidics, 3D printing of hydrogels, and engineered pain model. More detailed information is available at my group website (http://www.biotransportgroup.org/).

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Coursework on the followings are required: Solid/fluid mechanics, and heat/mass transfer.

Course work and interests on the followings are preferred but not required - 1) Fluorescence microscopy techniques; 2) BioMEMS and microfluidics and 3) Tissue engineering and biomechanics.

118

Byunghoo Jung (jungb@purdue.edu)

ECE
Byunghoo Jung

Research Interests

Wireless sensing circuits and systems

Topics of Potential Projects

Battery health condition monitoring system utilizing non-intrusive sensors and neural network-based sensor fusion algorithm

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Practical understandings on analog and mixed-signal circuit design and implementation

The work will include PCB design including analog and mixed-signal circuits Firmware coding for real-time sensor signal processing

The work will include firmware coding for noise filtering, optimal detection, and sensor fusion algorithms

19

Carlo Scalo (scalo@purdue.edu)

ME/AAE
Carlo Scalo

Research Interests

High-Speed Aerodynamics, Turbulent Flows, Computational Fluid Dynamics, Acoustics, Nonlinear Acoustics, Dynamical Systems, High-Performance Computing

Topics of Potential Projects

high-speed boundary layers, gasdynamics, turbulence, vortex dynamics

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

fluid dynamics, numerical methods, intermediate coding skills

121

Carolin Frueh (cfrueh@purdue.edu)

AAE
Carolin Frueh

Research Interests

Space Situational Awareness, Telescopes, Information Theory and Estimation

Topics of Potential Projects

Digital twin of the combined telescope and CCD/CMOS detector system:

design a full physics based digital twin of our sensor and telescope system, this includes optics but also electron responses on the detector of non-resolved objects, including celestial mechanics coordinate transformations

Autonomous collision avoidance:

Computation of risk of collision between two satellites and the autonomous avoidance maneuver in the presence of significant uncertainties in the non-linear orbit system

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

programming skills in matlab and/or python knowledge in orbit mechanics and/or optical sensor systems and/or computer vision/rendering strong mathematical background knowledge in non-linear estimation

20

Cary Troy (troy@purdue.edu)

CE
Cary Troy

Research Interests

Coastal engineering, limnology, turbulence, fluid mechanics, waves

Topics of Potential Projects

- Coastal erosion

- Turbulence and mixing in lakes

- Shoreline modeling

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Matlab, fluid mechanics

21

Chelsea Davis (chelsea@purdue.edu)

MSE
Chelsea Davis

Research Interests

Polymer mechanics, optical microscopy, adhesion, wetting, friction, thin film mechanics, measurement system development

Topics of Potential Projects

The development of stress around inclusions in rubber will be visualized by incorporating molecular "self-reporting" damage sensors into elastomeric networks. Upon reaching a threshold stress, these molecules become fluorescent, allowing the stress field to be "seen". This experimental project will include polymer sample preparation, micromechanical testing, and optical microscopy in addition to substantial data analysis.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Fundamental understanding of mechanics of materials

Willingness to develop visualization code in Matlab

117

Chi Hwan Lee (lee2270@purdue.edu)

BME / ME
Chi Hwan Lee

Research Interests

Soft Functional Materials; Flexible and Stretchable Biomedical Devices; Wearable Healthcare Systems; Bioelectronics; 3D Printing Techniques; Bio-Integrated Nanosystems;

Topics of Potential Projects

Cross-disciplinary expertise is often the key for innovations to tackle complicated and challenging paradigms. The scientific and engineering trainings in my lab at Purdue will be quite diverse, and spans expertise in many disciplines including biomedical, mechanical, and materials engineering. More importantly, you will gain fundamental understanding of the device physics, mechanics, and fabrication principles, along with clinical implementations through effective communications with medical doctors, clinicians, nurses, and caregivers.

Specifically, my lab currently focusses on the development of various 'sticker'-like electronics in which a wafer-scale thin film integrated circuit can be physically separated from its fabrication Si wafer and then attached on a temporary removable holder such as thermally releasable tape (PNAS, 115, 7236, 2018). My lab has designed and tailored the sticker-like electronics for various human body-integrated healthcare systems, including (1) the electronic skin-wearable patch (e-skin patch) that can be comfortably adhered to the submental area (under the chin), and then provide the ability to monitor muscle activities during swallowing exercise and maneuver for home-based telerehabilitation of patients with swallowing disorders (a.k.a. dysphasia) (Science Advances, in press), (2) the electronic glove (e-glove) in which fully integrated multimodal sensors are fabricated on a commercially available wearing glove in a monolithic manner, and then can be easily worn on a prosthetic hand to detect various external stimuli such as pressure, temperature, hydration, and electrical signals wherein the measured signals are displayed in a smart watch unit in a real-time fashion (NPG Asia Materials, 11, 43, 2019), and (3) the electronic tissue scaffold (e-scaffold) in which multimodal sensors are embedded inside a tissue scaffold for three-dimensional body mapping to understand tissue functions and behaviors in real time

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

I am pleased to invite the visiting students for the TraVERSE program. I consider applicants from the departments of BME, ME, and/or MSE who want to tackle the interdisciplinary challenges faced in the field of wearable healthcare systems. The applicants who have a background in functional soft materials, mechanics, circuit designs, wireless data communications, printing techniques, and other micro/nanofabrications are strongly encouraged. Interested individuals are encouraged to contact Professor Chi Hwan Lee to explore these opportunities.

116

Chongli Yuan (cyuan@purdue.edu)

ChE
Chongli Yuan

Research Interests

Biosensor and bioengineering

Topics of Potential Projects

Develop synthetic neurons to foster cell-to-cell communications and measure signal transduction kinetics.

Develop integrated biosensors for tracking cellular response to environmental chemicals.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Molecular cloning and mammalian cell culturing

22

Craig Goergen (cgoergen@purdue.edu)

BME
Craig Goergen

Research Interests

To advance small animal imaging techniques to study disease progression and improve detection and treatment across a broad spectrum of medical conditions. Focus is primarily on cardiac and vascular disease models in mice.

Topics of Potential Projects

We work to make novel contributions that have help push the small animal imaging field to be more accurate, efficient, and user-friendly. The imaging techniques developed and corresponding insights are of interest to experts in imaging, biomechanics, and cardiovascular disease. Examples include: 1) abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) imaging, 2) 4D ultrasound cardiac imaging, and 3) label-free photoacoustic techniques. These areas represent three of the most important topics in the study of modern cardiovascular disease.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Experience working with rodents and/or in image analysis is preferred. We already have collaborations initiated with groups in Norway, Switzerland, France, and Italy that may have interested students.

23

Dan Jiao (djiao@purdue.edu)

ECE
Dan Jiao

Research Interests

Electromagnetics, modeling and simulation of very large scale integrated circuits, fast solvers, fast algorithms

Topics of Potential Projects

Fast Algorithms for the Design and Analysis of Large-scale Integrated Circuits

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Good knowledge in electromagnetics and circuits. Good programming skills. Strong in math and physics.

24

Dana Weinstein (danaw@purdue.edu)

ECE
Dana Weinstein

Research Interests

Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) for sensors, microrobotics, ultrasound imaging, timing, and communication. We are interested in the design, fabrication, and prototyping of new transducers and ultimately system platforms leveraging both established and new materials in MEMS.

Topics of Potential Projects

Ultrasonic transducers for imaging, sensing, and communication on flexible substrates: In collaboration with Prof. Miko Cakmak in Materials Engineering, we are developing Ultrasonic capability in a flexible, Roll-to-Roll (large area), semi-transparent platform. Projects include device design, phased array actuation/sensing for high resolution imaging. Other possibilities include modeling of ultrasonic imaging capabilities on a flexible platform.

Microrobotic actuators: we are exploring a new phase transition material leveraging proton doping to generate large force-displacement and work density in micro robotic actuators. Projects include actuator design or integration of such actuators with control circuits to create amphibious microrobots.

Ferroelectric materials for MEMS transducers: CMOS foundries are moving to introduce ferroelectric materials into the gate dielectric of their transistors for memory devices. As the leading group designing unreleased MEMS-CMOS devices, we are interested in understanding the piezoelectric and mechanical properties of such materials toward the ultimate goal of low noise clocks and sensors integrated seamlessly in CMOS.

Other projects in MEMS are also open to discussion.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

- Background in Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and/or Physics.

- Board-level circuit design experience is needed for platform/system projects, though not for device-level projects.

- Experience with electrical characterization.

- Microfabrication experience would open doors to expanding device-level projects, but is not a strict requirement.

136

Daniel Elliott (elliottd@purdue.edu)

ECE
Daniel Elliott

Research Interests

Precision measurements in atoms

Measurements of the weak force between nuclei and electrons

Topics of Potential Projects

Precision measurements of the hyperfine structure of excited states of atomic Cesium.

Current theoretical techniques to calculate hyperfine coupling constants of the lowest energy states of atomic cesium from first principles are approaching a precision of 0.1%. These theoretical efforts are in urgent need of precise experimental measurements of these coupling constants for excited states. The proposed topic for this project is measurement of the hyperfine splitting for the ns ^2S_{1/2} states, where n = 9 - 12, of atomic cesium.

We will frequency lock a laser source to a stable, frequency comb source, and use frequency offset techniques to map out the frequency splitting between components of these excited states.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Background in physics or electrical engineering required. Experience in lasers, optics, electronics, and data analysis useful, but not required.

25

Darcy Bullock (darcy@purdue.edu)

CE
Darcy Bullock

Research Interests

Connected Vehicles

Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS)

Topics of Potential Projects

Work with my team of students on connected vehicle research

https://tinyurl.com/bullock-cv-blog

Work with my team on UAS Crash Scene Mapping

https://tinyurl.com/bullock-uas

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Interest in being a team player and strong computer programming skills.

102

David Cappelleri (dcappell@purdue.edu)

ME
David Cappelleri

Research Interests

Robotics and automation; microrobotics; surgical robotics; UAVs; agricultural robotics

Topics of Potential Projects

Design of a micromanipulation and assembly system to assemble microscale mobile microrobots.

Design of an automated assembly system for the assembly of a robotic minimally invasive surgical instrument

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Experience in the following: programming, computer vision, electromechanical systems, mechantronics, CAD, 3D printing, mechanical design.

119

David S Ebert (ebert@purdue.edu)

ECE
David Ebert

Research Interests

Visual analytics, interactive machine learning, data science, human-in-the-loop AI; trusted AI and decision-making

Topics of Potential Projects

human-guided, interactive machine learning to create trustable information for a variety of applications, including social media analytics, sustainable agriculture, video analytics.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Good programming expertise; basic knowledge of data analytics and/or machine learning; visualization/graphics experience a plus.

137

David S Ebert (ebert@purdue.edu)

ECE
David Ebert

Research Interests

Interactive Machine learning, visual analytics, visualization, trusted information

Topics of Potential Projects

The projects will be on creating interactive visual decision making environments with back end machine learning algorithms with the human providing feedback to the ML algorithms and seeing the performance and confidence of the algorithms to increase trust in results.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Advanced programming skills with either experience in machine learning or visualization

26

David Warsinger (dwarsing@purdue.edu)

ME
David Warsinger

Research Interests

Water-Energy systems, nanoengineering, thermofluids, membrane science

Topics of Potential Projects

  1. Novel thermal desalination technologies: nanomaterials for enhancing the efficiency of membrane distillation
  2. Water-Energy Microgrids: integration of renewable energy with desalination technologies, including, respectively, wind, solar, and reverse osmosis.
  3. Photonic membrane and materials: new material properties for membrane science, including for solar energy harvesting and catalysis

See www.Warsinger.com

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Strong research/project track record. Either strong modeling or experimental experience.

27

David Yu (davidyu@purdue.edu)

CE
David J. Yu

Research Interests

Resilience

Social-ecological systems

Socio-hydrology

Disaster resilience

Institutions and governance of commons

Topics of Potential Projects

Socio-hydrologic research on adaptive reservoir operations (NSF project).

Behavioral experimental studies on social memory of flood risk (internal project)

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

None

28

Davin Piercey (dpiercey@purdue.edu)

MSE
Davin Piercey

Research Interests

Energetic materials

Topics of Potential Projects

Energetic materials synthesis

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Chemistry bachelor degree

29

Davin Piercey (dpiercey@purdue.edu)

MSE
Davin Piercey

Research Interests

Energetic Materials

Topics of Potential Projects

Synthesis of energetic materials

(LMU Munich students very relevant)

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Organic synthesis background or chemistry undergraduate.

LMU grads of high interest.

30

Dengfeng Sun (dsun@purdue.edu)

AAE
Dengfeng Sun

Research Interests

Distributed control and optimization; cloud computing and fog computing; application to Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Systems, Air Transportation System, Air Traffic Control, and Intelligent Transportation Systems.

Topics of Potential Projects

  1. Modeling, simulation, and distributed optimization of unmanned aerial vehicle traffic control system
  2. Reinforcement learning for unmanned aerial vehicle coordination and path planning
  3. Distributed optimization for machine learning and artificial intelligence

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Optimization: theory, algorithms, and implementation. Basic programming skills.

122

Dennis Flanagan (flanagan@purdue.edu)

ABE
Dennis Flanagan

Research Interests

soil erosion by water mechanics, soil erosion control, erosion prediction, water quality

Topics of Potential Projects

Spatial soil erosion field measurement technologies, sediment tracers, remote sensing of soil erosion features and geometries (e.g. gullies). Modern physically-based soil erosion prediction models estimate soil loss and sediment deposition spatially down a hillslope profile.

However, data for model validation of spatial soil loss is severely lacking, and improved technologies are needed in order to test and validate existing and new erosion models.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Strong background in math, sciences (physics, soil science, etc.), remote sensing.

Experience with soil erosion models would also be very helpful.

31

Dionysios Aliprantis (dionysis@purdue.edu)

ECE
Dionysios Aliprantis

Research Interests

Broadly speaking, I am conducting research in the areas of electric machines and electric power systems.

Topics of Potential Projects

Potential topics stem from technical challenges related to the electrification of the transportation sector (electric vehicles, aircraft) and the integration of renewables in the grid. The project focus could be on a particular component (e.g., the design of an electric machine or drive system) or at a system level (e.g., controls that enhance the stability of a power system in the presence of distributed energy resources). I am interested in technical approaches that are based on applying novel mathematical techniques to such problems.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

* solid understanding of electrical engineering physics (e.g., low-frequency electromagnetism)

* analytical and mathematical skills

* excellent programming skills (e.g., Python, Matlab/Simulink, C++)

* familiarity with software such as PLECS, EMTP, PSS/E, etc

* familiarity with LaTeX

32

Eckhard A Groll (groll@purdue.edu)

ME
Eckhard Groll

Research Interests

Fundamental thermal sciences as applied to advanced energy conversion systems, components, and their working fluids. Positive displacement compressors and expanders.

Topics of Potential Projects

Performance Analysis and Design Optimization of Linear Compressors

Oil Management in Vapor Compression Systems

Performance Analysis and Reliability of Twin-Screw Compressors

Performance Analysis and Control Optimization of Multi-Temperature Refrigerated Container System with Multi-Stage Compression

Evaluating Adhesive Bonding of Aluminum and Copper in HVAC&R Applications

Vapor Compression Refrigeration System for Cold Storage on Spacecrafts

Control Strategies for Energy Use in the DC Nano-Grid House

High-Temperature Organic Rankine Cycle with Scroll Expander

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

C++ and/or Python coding experience. Experience with taking energy conversion system or component performance measurements, including power, mass flow rate, temperature, pressure, dew point, etc.

107

Edwin Garcia (redwing@purdue.edu)

MSE
R. Edwin Garcia

Research Interests

My research group is interested on the design of materials and devices through numerical modeling and simulation. The focus is on the properties and microstructural evolution of materials and devices. We integrate computational approaches ranging from kinetic Monte Carlo, phase field and level set methods, to finite elements, finite volumes, and symbolic computing.

Of importance to our research are microstructure design, crystallographic texture, and grain boundary science and engineering, aimed to control the topology of the underlying phases and thus establish practical relations between processing, microstructure, and material properties.

Fundamental areas of research include the prediction of equilibrium and kinetic properties in ferroelectric ceramics (in thin-film and bulk form, for both lead-containing and lead-free systems), electrochemical properties and interactions between charged point defects and grain boundaries, granular mixing and dynamics of dry and wet systems, and the generalities of microstructural evolution.

Applied areas of research include flash sintering, rechargeable lithium-ion batteries, and ferroelectric sensors and actuators.

Topics of Potential Projects

1. Modeling of Lithium-Ion Rechargeable Batteries. By using existing models, simulate existing and emerging chemistries of cathode and anode materials in porous form, including LiCoO2, LiMn2O4, LiFePO4, and others.

2. Data Analytics of Battery Materials. By using python scripting and Monte Carlo approaches, perform parametric analyses to identify those combination of battery parameters that will optimize performance, and minimize degradation.

3. Ferroelectric sensors and actuators. By using phase field techniques, predict the ferroelectric domain patterns as they develop in polycrystalline ceramics.

4. GPU Computing of Materials and Devices. Program new algorithms to accelerate the solution of PDEs, using our local GPU cluster.

5. Charged grain boundaries and interfaces. By using phase field solutions predict the equilibrium and transport properties of ionic ceramics

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

For 1. A background on electrochemistry and/or Python programming.

For 2. A background on electrochemistry and/or Python programming.

For 3. A background on ferroelectrics and/or Python programming.

For 4. A background on GPU/CUDA and python programming would be useful.

For 5. A background on python and phase field modeling.

123

Elsje Pienaar (epienaar@purdue.edu)

BME
Elsje Pienaar

Research Interests

Computational models in infectious diseases

Topics of Potential Projects

Probabilistic models of drug resistance in TB Viral assembly dynamical models

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Basic coding and ordinary differential equation experience. Matlab preferred. Basic biological knowledge of viral and bacterial infections.

33

Enrico Martinez (marti309@purdue.edu)

ChE

Research Interests

Biodiesel Production from Spent Coffee Grounds (SCG)

Chemical and Material Extraction from Wood and Related Biological Feedstocks: Extracting Value from the World's Largest Under-Utilized (and Sustainable) Carbon Source.

Topics of Potential Projects

The biodiesel projects involves determination of trans-esterification reaction between coffee oil and methanol or ethanol with an enzyme catalyst, kinetics of coffee oil extraction from coffee grounds and full process design for the Biodiesel from SCG production process

The second projects involves studying the kinetics of the reaction of wood chips with methanol with a catalyst to depolymerize lignin into valuable chemicals and the study of lignin dissolution from wood chips with methanol.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Preferably Chemical Engineering or Chemistry major, although Materials Engineering or Biochemical Engineering would also be acceptable. Good command of mathematical modeling and computational techniques for design and simulation. Experience in experimentation desirable.

34

Ernest R Blatchley III (blatch@purdue.edu)

CE/EEE
Ernest Blatchley

Research Interests

Water treatment, water chemistry

Topics of Potential Projects

  1. Chlorine/UV as an advanced oxidation process. Free or combined chlorine is photolyzed to yield one or more free radicals, which go on to promote oxidation of other compounds in solution. This process can be developed to be selective for degradation of amines, including a wide range of important water contaminants. Experiments will be conducted to define mechanisms and kinetics of these reactions for degradation of high profile water contaminants.
  2. Solar UV radiation is effective for inactivation of microbial pathogens. These rate of this process depends on the ambient solar UV spectrum, which in turn is affected by latitude, longitude, altitude, and ambient sky condition. Numerical simulations of this behavior will be conducted to define temporal and spatial variability of the solar UV spectrum. These simulation results will be used to design experiments to quantify the rate of inactivation of a critical waterborne pathogen, Cryptosporidium parvum.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

  1. Experience and academic background in water chemistry.
  2. Numerical modeling and/or experience with microbiological methods.
134

Ernesto Marinero (eemarinero@purdue.edu)

MSE
Ernesto Marinero

Research Interests

  1. Energy Storage Materials and Devices
  2. Ultrafast Magneto-Photonic Devices
  3. Ultrasensitive Magnetic Sensors and Mesoscale Magnetic Transducers for Neuroscience Research

Topics of Potential Projects

Energy Storage Materials and Devices:

development of solid-state battery materials and devices. Focus on composite materials comprising for example, super-ionic conducting garnet materials embedded in ionically conducting polymers, to increment the energy capacity, performance and safety of future energy storage devices.

Ultrafast Magneto-Photonic Devices:

we are developing hybrid photonic-magnetic nanostructures for the ultrafast (fs - ps time scales) manipulation of the magnetic orientation in nanomagnets. The project involves thin film growth, nanofabrication and ultrafast optical switching and characterization of spin dynamics.

Ultrasensitive Magnetic Sensors and Mesoscale Magnetic Transducers for Neuroscience Research:

we are developing in-vitro platforms comprising sensors and transducers for sensing magnetic signals and response to electromagnetic stimulation of neurons prior to and following physico-chemical interactions known to result in neurological diseases,

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Project 1:

competencies in materials engineering/science including synthesis and characterization. Skills in sol-gel synthesis, XRD, SEM, Impedance spectroscopy and polymer characterization highly desirable.

Project 2:

competencies in magnetism, optics, photonics (Materials Science, Physics, ECE, ME). Skills in thin film deposition, nanoscale fabrication and ultrafast laser techniques highly desirable.

Project 3:

competencies in biomedical engineering, neuroscience, sensor fabrication highly desirable.

35

Fabio Ribeiro (fabio@purdue.edu)

ChE
Fabio Ribeiro

Research Interests

Catalysis

Topics of Potential Projects

Participate in the Center for Innovative and Strategic Transformation of Alkane Resources in area related to energy and hydrocarbons

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Pursuing degree in Chemical Engineering or Chemistry and interest in kinetics and catalysis

36

Fabio Semperlotti (fsemperl@purdue.edu)

ME
Fabio Semperlotti

Research Interests

Elastic and acoustic metamaterials, structural dynamics and vibration control, structural health monitoring, acoustic black hole structures and metastructures, computational modeling for continuum mechanics

Topics of Potential Projects

Any of the research areas above offer possibilities research opportunities.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Strong background in math, mechanics, dynamics and coding. Students with background in mechanical and aerospace engineering, engineering mechanics, physics and applied mathematics would be ideal and find a good fit with the ongoing research in the group.

129

Felix Lin (xzl@purdue.edu)

ECE
Felix Xiaozhu Lin

Research Interests

OS and runtime for security, data analytics, and mobile/IoT.

We build things!

Topics of Potential Projects

For a brief statement of our research, see https://fxlin.github.io/

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Interested in systems software

37

Fu Zhao (fzhao@purdue.edu)

ME/EEE
Fu Zhao

Research Interests

Design for the environment, sustainable manufacturing, life cycle assessment

Topics of Potential Projects

Manufacturing is expected to remain a major energy user and sustainable manufacturing has attracted increasing attention in recent years. This project looks at a variety of approaches to increase energy and material efficiency of manufacturing processes and systems, including but not limited to: process characterization and modeling, process planning, shop floor scheduling, supply chain management, and recycling. In particular, opportunities exist to leverage recent advancement on data analytics, artificial intelligence, and smart manufacturing.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

familiar with manufacturing processes;

strong math skills;

interests in sustainability;

38

George Zhou (zhizhou@purdue.edu)

CE/EEE
George (Zhi) Zhou

Research Interests

Wastewater treatment, antibiotic resistance, biofuel, electrochemical filtration

Topics of Potential Projects

The first potential research project is to understand the drivers and barriers of antibiotic resistance in wastewater treatment plants and natural environments. Antibiotic resistance is one of the biggest threats to global human health and development. There is a critical knowledge gap on the development, spread, and attenuation of antibiotic resistance. The specific research objectives are to: 1) identify the key drivers and barriers of antibiotic resistant bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes in wastewater treatment plants and natural environments, 2) examine the effects of sub-inhibitory concentrations of antibiotics, nutrients, and heavy metals on the development of antibiotic resistance, and 3) identify correlation between antibiotic resistance and operation conditions in wastewater treatment plants and evaluate the feasibility of controlling the spread of antibiotic resistance in wastewater treatment plants.

The second research project is to develop anti-fouling electrochemical ceramic membrane to treat emerging chemical and biological contaminants, such as antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes. The specific research objectives are to 1) design and fabricate electrochemical graphene-carbon nanotube ceramic membranes to reduce fouling potential and increase separation performance, 2) determine the effects of operation conditions on the performance of fabricated ceramic membranes, and 3) elucidate molecular mechanisms of biofouling reduction.

The third research project is to explore nature-assisted techniques to improve cost-effective production of biofuels. The specific research objectives are to: 1) evaluate the molecular mechanism of viral infection of algal cells, 2) understand lipid profiles after viral infection and compare with sonication, and 3) evaluate the feasibility of applying viral infection for scaled-up application of algal biofuel production.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Students with background in environmental engineering, environmental microbiology, molecular microbiology, and environmental science are encouraged to apply. Laboratory experience on biology, engineering, material fabrication, or electrochemistry are preferred.

39

Gesualdo Scutari (gscutari@purdue.edu)

IE
Gesualdo Scutari

Research Interests

Machine Learning, Distributed Algorithms, Optimization

Topics of Potential Projects

Application of optimization techniques to data science problems

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

strong background in mathematics, exposure to optimization

40

Guang Lin (guanglin@purdue.edu)

ME
Guang Lin

Research Interests

Machine learning, data science, uncertainty quantification, image analysis, computational fluid dynamics, power network modeling, additive manufacturing

Topics of Potential Projects

Deep-learning based Cyro-EM image analysis

Brief description: The focus of this project is to remove image noise and reconstruct 3D images from 2D projection images.

A Deep learning-based online platform for critical anomaly detection and emergency control to enhance grid reliability and resiliency

Brief description: The focus of this project is to employ deep reinforcement learning to develop an online emergency control platform to real-time detect critical anomaly and deploy optimal emergency control strategies.

A data science approach to the qualification of additive manufactured material.

Brief description: The focus of this project is to develop advanced deep learning algorithms to predict material mechanical properties based on additive manufactured material microstructure.

Machine Learning for Real-time Prediction of Power System Behavior

Brief description: The focus of this project is to develop advanced deep learning algorithms to predict power system dynamics in real time and conduct contingency analysis in a probabilistic manner.

Image classification & density estimation of white tailed deer across Indiana

Brief description: Deer management has important economic, ecological and societal impact for Indiana. The focus of this project is to help the Indiana Department of Natural Resources to better track the deer population in the state by processing field camera images. The objective of this project is to develop machine learning model to classify white tail deer from photos and estimate the population density of white tail deer.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Basic linear algebra, familiar with one programming language, such as Python, Matlab, C, TensorFlow, PyTorch, etc.

41

Guillermo Paniagua (gpaniagua@purdue.edu)

ME
Guillermo Paniagua

Research Interests

Turbines, Propulsion, Measurement Techniques Aerodynamics, Convective Heat transfer.

Topics of Potential Projects

Turbine research: Design, Analysis computational and experimental, Optimization, development of novel concepts

Propulsion research: New engines modeling, optimization for transient operation, rotating detonation engine - turbine integration, hypersonic propulsion concept analysis and testing

Measurement techniques: Develop both optical and conventional sensors for harsh environments

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Preferably from the schools of: Chalmers (Sweden); Universidad Politecnica de Valencia (Spain); Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (Spain); TU Berlin (Germany); TU Darmstadt (Germany); Oxford (United Kingdom); Cambridge (United Kingdom)

42

Hector Gomez (hectorgomez@purdue.edu)

ME
Hector Gomez

Research Interests

Computational fluid dynamics, Computational biomechanics, Multiphase flows, Cavitation, Porous media flow, Fracture mechanics.

Topics of Potential Projects

Any topic related to the research interests listed above.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Strong background in numerical analysis and partial differential equations.

108

Inez Hua (hua@purdue.edu)

EEE/CE
Inez Hua

Research Interests

Sustainable electronics and the circular economy Industrial water consumption: water quantity and quality

Topics of Potential Projects

1) Recovering value from end-of-life and in-storage consumer electronic devices

Electronic and electrical devices greatly benefit society and individuals, and demand for these products is driven by numerous factors, including expanded telecommunications coverage, lower product prices, shorter use cycles, and ownership of multiple devices. Electronic devices are comprised of valuable materials, such as metals. For example, over 50 metals have been detected in cell phones, including precious, rare earth and critical metals. Recovery of these devices and the metals would have a significant environmental benefit, including reduced energy use and greenhouse gas emissions, and reduced impacts from mining metal ores. The flow of devices through consumer households needs to be better characterized. Recent studies indicate a large number of devices are “in storage” in households: they are not being used, nor have they been disposed of or recycled. There are a variety of technological and social factors that contribute to the high storage rate. This project will consist of collecting and synthesizing data and developing models to characterize stocks and flows of electronic devices in U.S. households. Preliminary results from a systems dynamics model, applied to cell phones, indicate that almost 50% of mobile phones purchased by consumers in the U. S. will be “in storage” in households. The collective value of the phones in storage is estimated to be > 1 billion dollars.

2) Environmental impacts of aluminum smelting

Aluminum products can be created from both natural sources (bauxite ore) and scrap aluminum; however, the process of taking bauxite ore and processing it to primary aluminum ingots is referred to as primary production. Reported global primary aluminum production is estimated to be 63.4 million tons. The electrolytic reduction of alumina to aluminum (i.e. smelting) via the Hall-Heroult process produces the most air emissions (e.g. SOx, NOx, particulates) and uses much more electricity (10-100x) than any other life cycle stage. Therefore, the electrolysis unit process, from a life cycle perspective, is the most damaging to the environment and the focus of this project .The purpose of this work is to quantify direct and indirect emissions from global aluminum smelting facilities in a spatially explicit manner, such that local and regional air quality impacts can be characterized. This work will also implement data regarding existing population level PM2.5 pollution exposures to characterize the contribution from the aluminum smelting industry to the local/regional air pollution burden.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Students should have extensive coursework and some research experience related to environmental engineering. Experience with modeling, GIS, and data analytics also desirable.

43

Ivan Christov (christov@alum.mit.edu)

ME
Ivan Christov

Research Interests

Flows in microfluidics devices

Soft matter and fluid mechanics

Computational fluid dynamics

Fluid--structure interactions

Flows of dense suspensions

Modeling of porous media flows

Nonlinear waves and metamaterials

Topics of Potential Projects

The Transport: Modeling, Numerics & Theory Laboratory (TMNT-Lab) strives to combine advanced mathematical concepts and experimental results with mechanistic insight about the multiphysics modeling of flowing materials in order to make progress on fundamental research questions. Specifically, an overarching theme of the TMNT-Lab's research is transport (e.g., as a means of effecting mixing or for mitigating separation).

Two main topics are of current interest.

  1. We are developing theory of microscale fluid--structure interactions to yield predictive models of the response of soft devices due to internal flow within. This involves understanding viscous flow, elastic deformation, and their coupling.
  2. We are developing computational models of multiphase flows at the microscale and through porous media. We are interested in the stability of fluid interfaces, particle migration in dense suspensions. Heat transfer is also being taken into account in our computational models with an outlook towards new working complex fluids for microelectronics cooling and thermal interface materials.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

  1. Strong foundation in mathematics for engineering (partial differential equations, solution methods, numerical methods)
  2. Strong background in mechanics (fluid, solid or both).
  3. Familiarity with at least one common computational platform (for example, ANSYS or OpenFOAM, etc.)
  4. Interest in fundamental mathematical and computational research in the engineering sciences. (We do not do experiments in my group.)
44

James Garrison (jgarriso@purdue.edu)

AAE/ECE
James Garrison

Research Interests

Remote sensing (microwave)

Earth observation

Satellite navigation (GNSS)

Geophysics

Agricultural sensing

Topics of Potential Projects

  1. Wideband altimetry using signals of opportunity in Ku-Ka band
  2. Orbit determination of non-cooperative satellite transmitters
  3. UAV remote sensing for precision agriculture using low frequency (P- and I-band) signals of opportunity to sense soil moisture and biomass

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Basic linear systems (impulse response, frequency response, etc). Some understanding of basic electromagnetics and random variables/stochastic processes is desirable. Students must have good programming and data science skills. Most of my research involves experimental work, so students must be competent collecting, protecting and processing large volumes of data. Field work may be required, so students should be willing to work outdoors.

131

James Garrison (jgarriso@purdue.edu)

AAE
James Garrison

Research Interests

  • Microwave Remote Sensing
  • Global Navigation Satellite Systems
  • Software Defined Radio

Topics of Potential Projects

We are developing a number of applications of "signals of opportunity" remote sensing, re-utilizing the signals broadcast from communication satellites for Earth remote sensing. Work may involve building prototype systems for capturing and processing these calibrated signal, and demonstrating them from towers of unpiloted aircraft in field experiments, as well as developing algorithms for processing the data collected from these systems and other instruments on orbiting satellites to estimate various geophysical parameters such as soil moisture, ocean winds, and snow depth.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

  • Basic signal processing
  • Random Variables/stochastic processes
  • some understanding of electromagnetics
  • Excellent programming skills
  • Willingness to work outdoors on field experiments
100

James Gibert (jgibert@purdue.edu)

ME
James Gibert

Research Interests

Nonlinear Dynamics, Smart Materials, Smart Structures, Viscoelasticity

Topics of Potential Projects

Printable Triboelectric Devices

The term triboelectricity literally means “electricity generated by friction.'' It is derived from the Greek root tribos, meaning rubbing. However, this definition is misleading; rubbing is not necessary to transfer charge between materials, mere contact will suffice. Triboelectricity is due to contact electrification, a phenomenon that occurs when nearly any combination of metal (conductor), semiconductor, or dielectric (insulator) materials come into contact. Recently, research has focused on triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs). These generators have nanostructures on the surface of the dielectric to enhance the charge transfer between materials. TENGs have been used in personal electronics, biomedical systems, electrochemical applications, and human body energy harvesting.

It is accepted that triboelectric generators operate by the same principles as a biased electrostatic transduction energy harvester common in microelectromechanical system (MEMS) devices. The differences between TGs and MEMS devices are the lack of a proof mass, the use of flexible materials for both the dielectric and electrodes, and the size of the device. In this project we focus on developing novel strategies to create these structures using a combination of 3D printing and molding techniques.

Graph Based Optimization of Resonators

Recently the ADAMS lab has developed a framework for optimization of ground element based structures to prevent unconnected, i.e., “bouncing members” using a Graph Based Element Removal Method (GERM). The process treats the connectivity of each member as a graph of nodes (elements in the FEA analysis); unconnected nodes along the graph are removed from the optimization routine. While the method works has been proven in designing structures that can be modeled as such as bridges, resonators, or compliant mechanisms. It has not yet been adapted to optimize structures that must be modeled using continuum elements.

Ultrasonically Additive Manufactured Multifunctional Material Systems

Ultrasonic Additive Manufacturing (UAM) machine consists of an ultrasonic horn, also known as the sonotrode, transducers, a heater, and a movable base. The process begins with the placement of a thin metal foil, on a sacrificial base plate bolted on a heated anvil. The foil is compressed under pressure by the rolling sonotrode, which is also excited by the piezoelectric transducers at a constant frequency with amplitudes ranging on the order of microns in a direction transversal to the rolling motion. Once the first layer is bonded, additional layers are added and can be machined as needed until the desired geometry and dimensions of a feature are realized.

Candidate projects include embedded piezoelectric actuator for sensing applications and shape memory alloy sheets to create localized structural changes in a metal skin. Other potential projects are the creation of metal structures beam with magno-elastic properties. One embodiment is the creation of composite aluminum beams elastomer core filled with magnetic materials. Different configurations of magnetic materials will be explored to create structures that buckle or stiffen in the presence of magnetic fields.

Elastomeric Metastructure

Mechanical metamaterials are artificial material systems with mechanical properties defined by their structure rather than their material composition. They are the mechanical counterparts of the well-known family of optical metamaterials]. The current development of these materials opens up new possibilities to engineer systems to exhibit behavior not normally found in the natural world. Paradoxically, many of these metamaterials are engineered to rely on their topology, yet they are composed of elastomers with viscoelastic behavior. Until recently the development of these materials the viscoelastic nature been overlooked or has characterized but not explicitly exploited. The unique properties of these materials can be retained by keeping their architected structure; however, this behavior can be expanded by reintroducing the effect of composition, namely viscoelasticity, in their formulation and analysis.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Matlab or other programming knowledge. Familiarity with basic manufacturing and machining techniques.

45

Janelle Wharry (jwharry@purdue.edu)

MSE/NE
Janelle Wharry

Research Interests

Irradiation effects on materials (structure, properties, functionality); mechanical properties of materials; advanced processing & welding/joining of materials; metallurgy

Topics of Potential Projects

Most broadly, work will focus on characterization of materials. The material(s) to be studied, and the types of characterization techniques, can be tailored to suit the student's interests. Several project options are detailed as follows:

  1. We aim to qualify advanced manufacturing and welding techniques for nuclear energy applications. Toward this end, the student will investigate the effects of irradiation on structural alloys fabricated by advanced manufacturing and advanced electron beam welding. This project will involve transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for microstructure characterization and nanoindentation for mechanical characterization. The project will entail collaboration with (and travel to) the Idaho National Laboratory.
  2. This project option aims to use irradiation to tailor deformation mechanisms of steels. Specifically, the student will conduct scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and TEM in situ mechanical testing to introduce deformation on different grain orientations. Subsequently, TEM characterization will check for evidence of deformation mechanisms such as twinning or phase transformations.
  3. We aim to demonstrate the role of irradiation on enhancing the electrochemical charge storage performance of metal oxide anode materials such as TiO2. Our work thus far has shown that irradiation-induced defects enhance the intercalation of Li ions into TiO2 (for a Li ion battery application). In this project, the student will conduct TEM investigation to understand the synergistic production of defects and chemical implantation effects due to heavy ion irradiation of TiO2.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Student should be seeking a M.S. degree in materials science/engineering, or a related discipline but with materials-focused thesis topic. Ideally, the student will have experience with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and focused ion beam (FIB) milling. However, a student who does not have direct, hands-on TEM and FIB experience will also be eligible if they have some understanding of what these techniques are.

46

Jay Gore (gore@purdue.edu)

ME
Jay Gore

Research Interests

Energy, combustion, fire safety, sensors, computations, artificial intelligence, foreign policy

Topics of Potential Projects

Analyzing vast amounts of data collected by a PhD student using statistical time and space series analysis and artificial intelligence tools to minimize the need for additional expensive experiments.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Strong background in statistics and numerical methods. Programming skills in C++ and Python.

47

Jeffrey P Youngblood (jpyoungb@purdue.edu)

MSE
Jeffrey Youngblood

Research Interests

ceramic processing using polymeric methods, advanced composites and fabrication, renewable resins cellulose nanocomposites, cementitious materials and durable anti-ice coatings

Topics of Potential Projects

  1. Cellulose nanomaterials and nanocomposites processing for high strength structural materials, high barrier food packaging, and infrastructure (cement) applications.
  2. Ceramic processing via extrusion and injection molding to align microstructures and form complex shapes in high hardness and ultra high temperature materials.
  3. Direct Ink Writing Additive Layer Manufacturing (3D printing) to tune toughness in brittle materials such as cement, ceramic, and nanocomposites.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Topic 1: Any of polymer science, polymer engineering, thermophysical properties/characterization

Topic 2: Ceramics or Materials Engineering

Topic 3: Cementitious materials, ceramics, polymer engineering, general materials engineering knowledge.

48

John Morgan (jamorgan@purdue.edu)

ChE
John Morgan

Research Interests

Metabolic engineering, plant metabolism, biofuels

Topics of Potential Projects

Development of algae for biofuel production

Synthetic biology of yeast for production of fuel oxygenates

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Biotechnology or chemical engineering background

49

John W. Sutherland (jwsuther@purdue.edu)

EEE
John Sutherland

Research Interests

Sustainable Design and Manufacturing

Topics of Potential Projects

Smart and Sustainable Manufacturing

Green Scheduling

Green Products and Processes

Circular Economy

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Background in product engineering or manufacturing/industrial engineering

133

Jong Hyun Choi (jchoi@purdue.edu)

ME
Jong Hyun Choi

Research Interests

  1. DNA self-assembly
  2. 2D materials

Topics of Potential Projects

  1. synthesis and characterization of DNA origami
  2. modulation of optoelectronic properties of 2D TMDC semiconductors

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

50

Joseph Rispoli (jrispoli@purdue.edu)

BME
Joseph Rispoli

Research Interests

magnetic resonance imaging

radiofrequency coils and antennas

electromagnetic fields

radiofrequency modelling

multinuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

Topics of Potential Projects

Radiofrequency coil development for MRI/MRS: Projects can be either hardware-focused, e.g., designing, building, testing, and scanning with custom radiofrequency coils, or computational, e.g., development of EM models of RF coils, development of algorithms for safety monitoring during MRI.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

required training: electromagnetics

optional training: computational modelling, antenna theory

optional skills: soldering, circuit fabrication

51

Julio Ramirez (ramirez@purdue.edu)

CE
Julio Ramirez

Research Interests

Seismic performance of buildings and infrastructure.

Topics of Potential Projects

Shear Strength of Concrete Members under bending and axial force.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Structural design and analysis

Seismic response of concrete buildings

127

Jun Chen (junchen@purdue.edu)

ME
Jun Chen

Research Interests

Experimental and Applied Fluid Mechanics

Topics of Potential Projects

1. Development of advanced flow diagnostics techniques

2. Application of non-invasive flow diagnostics techniques to various fluids problems.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Good knowledge of fluid mechanics and experimental techniques Willing to work on experiments

52

Justin Weibel (jaweibel@purdue.edu)

ME
Justin Weibel

Research Interests

Electronics cooling and packaging

Phase-change transport phenomena

Microscale and nanoscale surface engineering for enhanced thermal transport

Energy efficiency in thermal systems

Transport in porous materials

Microscale diagnostics and sensing

Topics of Potential Projects

In recent years, the interest in additive manufacturing (AM) of electronics cooling devices has increased due to its enhanced design freedom relative to conventional manufacturing methodologies. Microchannel heat sinks (MCHS) are liquid cooled heat sinks commonly used in thermal management of high-power electronics and have feature sizes on the order of 10s or 100s of microns. The design freedom brought by AM can be used to generate high-performance MCHSs with complex geometries which can be easily 3D printed. A potential project topic would focus on design, 3D printing, and experimental testing of such heat sinks. By the end of the program, the student would become familiar with metal 3D printing, design optimization (size, shape, and topology optimization), and thermal engineering.

A large number of other project opportunities are available in the Cooling Technologies Research Center at Purdue, https://engineering.purdue.edu/CTRC/research/index.php, with several selected topics below:

  • Novel technique for high heat flux cooling and hotspot damping
  • Single and two-phase microchannel heat sinks and heat exchangers
  • Micropumping and electrowetting-based fluid actuation
  • Immersion cooling; boiling from micro- and nano-structured surfaces
  • Miniature piezoelectric fans, synthetic jets, air amplifiers, and ion-driven air flows
  • Compact natural convection cooling
  • Miniature refrigeration systems and compressors
  • Surface engineering for enhanced thermal transport
  • Coatings-based passive radiative cooling
  • High-performance and multi-functional thermal interface materials (TIMs)
  • Thermomechanical behavior of composite and polymeric TIMs
  • Tunable and high- and low-conductivity materials
  • Ultra-thin heat spreaders and novel composite heat spreaders
  • Nonconventional and miniature heat pipes
  • Heat transfer in metal foams, wick structures, and other porous materials
  • Phase change materials and energy storage
  • Waste-heat recovery; energy use optimization
  • Battery thermal management
  • Microjets and jet impingement; spray cooling
  • Low-noise fans and blowers
  • Thermoelectrics; cryogenic and low-temperature cooling
  • Heat transport and fouling in compact heat exchangers
  • Heat sink design, characterization, and optimization
  • Novel micro- and nano-scale diagnostics
  • Thermal management for 3D packaging
  • Leveraging advanced manufacturing in cooling technologies

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Students will be able to excel if they have previously taken courses in heat transfer and fluid mechanics.

53

Karen Marais (kmarais@purdue.edu)

AAE
Karen Marais

Research Interests

System safety and risk assessment

Space habitat architecture

Air transportation and the environment

Systems engineering theory and education

Topics of Potential Projects

Design for Resilient Space Habitats

Accident Analysis and Modeling

Improved Systems Engineering Teaching Methods

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Aerospace engineering and/or systems engineering

Interest in multidisciplinary work

Strong communication skills

54

Kaushik Roy (kaushik@purdue.edu)

ECE
Kaushik Roy

Research Interests

Neuromorphic computing

Neuro-mimetic devices

Robust learning; adversarial robustness

AI hardware

Topics of Potential Projects

Neuromorphic computing -- spiking and non-spiking networks; input coding for SNNs

Neuro-mimetic devices -- spin devices, FeFETs

Robust learning; adversarial robustness

AI hardware

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Neural networks; algorithms

Linear algebra and statistics

Computer hardware and or devices (depending on what the students want to work on)

55

Kejie Zhao (kjzhao@purdue.edu)

ME
Kejie Zhao

Research Interests

Mechanics of Materials

Energy storage materials

Organic polymers

Topics of Potential Projects

Mechanical reliability of Li-ion batteries

Mechanical reliability of organic electrochromics

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Mechanics, materials.

56

Kevin Webb (webb@purdue.edu)

ECE
Kevin Webb

Research Interests

Biophotonics; neuroscience; in vivo optical imaging; super-resolution optical imaging; optomechanics; and nanophotonics

Topics of Potential Projects

All projects involve work with at least one Ph.D. student in the Webb group. The specific project would be determined after discussion of the interest scope of the person involved, and could involve theory, computation, optical experiments, and fabrication (one of multiple facets). Example projects are as follows.

  1. Optical imaging to determine the basis of Parkinson's disease.
  2. Imaging of neural network information deep in the brain.
  3. Imaging and modeling neuron calcium signaling with microscope data and fluorescent reporters.
  4. Simulation and experimental work related to super-resolution optical imaging by motion in coherent structured illumination.
  5. Optical force experiments, where membrane deflection is sensed, with an emphasis on fundamental and applied concepts, including the role of nanostructured media.
  6. Theory and simulations of optical force and torque on nanostructures.
  7. Fabrication and characterization of membrane structures for optomechanics applications.
  8. Imaging in scattering media (fog, tissue, ...) using laser speckle correlations.
  9. Semiconductor detect detection, to solve a need in the inspection industry.
  10. Tracking and imaging satellites.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Math, physics (including electromagnetics) for theory, some background in writing a computer code (Matlab, C, ..) or numerical methods (for simulation work where there is no analytical solution), and some interest in, or experience with, experiments, for that aspect. Basically, a strong analytic/math/physical background and interest in exciting and frontier work are preferred. People could come from Engineering (electrical, biomedical, ...), Physics, and related fields.

57

Letian Dou (dou10@purdue.edu)

ChE
Letian Dou

Research Interests

Nano materials; organic - inorganic hybrid materials; semiconductors; solar cells; electronics.

Topics of Potential Projects

Currently, we are using halide perovskites and functional organic/biological molecules as the model system to develop new hybrid materials with unique functionality; we are also investigating the assembly behavior and transport phenomenon at the interfaces, and applying them into electronic, optoelectronic, and bio-sensor devices to improve the efficiency and reliability.

List of active projects:

  1. Chemistry and physics of two-dimensional hybrid perovskite nano materials.
  2. High performance perovskite solar cells, LEDs, and transistors.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Major in chemistry, chemical engineering, materials science, electrical engineering or related subjects.

120

Li Qiao (lqiao@purdue.edu)

AAE
Li Qiao

Research Interests

Prof. Qiao's research interests are in general area of combustion and propulsion. Current projects include nanoscale energetic materials, alternative fuels and fuel synthesis, pre-chamber turbulent jet ignition for lean-burn engines, supercritical droplets and jets, and novel laser and x-ray diagnostic methods.

Topics of Potential Projects

Project 1: Supercritical behaviors in high-pressure propulsion systems.

Rocket engines operate at high pressures, e.g., the most powerful liquid rockets, the RD-170 family, have a chamber pressure of 245 bar. As a result of the high pressure, the injected fuel may be at transcritical or supercritical state during the injection, mixing and vaporization processes. Previous studies have provided important insights on supercritical behaviors, as well as limitations of current theoretical modeling and numerical simulations of such behaviors. The introduction of thermodynamic nonidealities and transport anomalies near the critical point is one of the main challenges to model these phenomena. Very limited experimental data are available for either quantitative understanding of the physics or for assessment of various models. Although we have good knowledge of the classical two-phase atomization regime and the supercritical one-phase mixing regime, the transition from the former to the latter is less understood. This project intends to understand the physics of fuel injection, mixing and vaporization at high pressures by theoretical analysis and molecular dynamics simulations.

Project 2: Pre-chamber turbulent jet ignition for lean-burn engines

Ultra-lean combustion technologies have been regarded as a potential solution for the engine and power industries to meet the ever-stringent emission regulations. Ultra-lean combustion however has serious challenges. Ignition is difficult when the mixture is very lean. Misfire can lead to reduction in efficiency, increase in unburned hydrocarbon emissions, and rough operation. An approach that can potentially solve these problems is to use a hot turbulent jet to ignite the lean mixture, rather than using a conventional electric spark.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

For project one, students who have taken graduate-level thermodynamics and gas dynamic courses are preferred. Students who have had experience with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) or molecular simulations (MD) would be a big plus.

For project two, students who have had some lab hands-on experience would be ideal.

58

Mahdi Hosseini (mh@purdue.edu)

ECE
Mahdi Hosseini

Research Interests

Quantum communication, light-atom interactions, quantum optomechanics, quantum sensing and imaging

Topics of Potential Projects

I- Experimental development of a room-temperature quantum source of light for quantum imaging

II- Assisting with experimental development of stable superconducting levitation

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Project I: Basic knowledge of light-atom interactions and basic experience with optical equipment

Project II: Basic knowledge of electromagnetics and feedback control

59

Margaret Gitau (mgitau@purdue.edu)

ABE
Margaret Gitau

Research Interests

Water resources; water quality; hydrologic and water quality modeling; climate, land use and land management impacts on water resources; development of computer-based applications for water resources decision making and management

Topics of Potential Projects

  1. Development of methodologies for forecasting risks for water quality impairments based on existing water quality data.
  2. Online rendering and testing of the water quality decision making and management application WQUICK for providing dynamic indications of water quality status and generating interactive visualizations for use by water quality managers.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

  1. Machine learning, Statistics
  2. Web technologies including HTML, PHP, CSS, Javascript, Python, Ruby, Git, and/or C#, Water resources.
60

Marisol Koslowski (marisol@purdue.edu)

ME
Marisol Koslowski

Research Interests

Computational Engineering, solid mechanics, finite element simulations

Topics of Potential Projects

Fracture mechanics in composite materials.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

BS or MS in Mechanical Engineering, Materials Science, Aeronautics or related

61

Martin Byung-Guk Jun (mbgjun@purdue.edu)

ME
Martin Byung-Guk Jun

Research Interests

Smart manufacturing, micro-scale manufacturing, optical fiber sensors, nanoparticle coating

Topics of Potential Projects

Digital twin development for machine tools and manufacturing processes.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Computer programming, mechatronics, VR programming, IoT sensor and devices

62

Martin Byung-Guk Jun (mbgjun@purdue.edu)

ME
Martin Byung-Guk Jun

Research Interests

Digital twins for smart manufacturing; AI for smart manufacturing; Manufacturing processes for wearable devices; Fabrication of optical fiber sensors

Topics of Potential Projects

Creation of digital twins in VR environment for equipment and processes at digital manufacturing enterprise testbed (DMET) and use of IoT devices for monitoring for smart manufacturing applications as well as AI-based analysis of the signals and data obtained from the testbed.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

CAD/CAM, computer programming, data analytics, VR programming

63

Meng Cui (mengcui@purdue.edu)

ECE
Meng Cui

Research Interests

We work at the interface of engineering and neuroscience. Specifically, we leverage the advance of computation imaging, photonics and device fabrication to build new generations of neurophotonic interface. Here are samples of our work.

  • Park, Jung-Hoon, Lingjie Kong, Yifeng Zhou, and Meng Cui. "Large-field-of-view imaging by multi-pupil adaptive optics." Nature Methods 14, no. 6 (2017): 581-583.
  • Cui, Meng, Yifeng Zhou, Bowen Wei, Xiao-Hong Zhu, Wei Zhu, Mark A. Sanders, Kamil Ugurbil, and Wei Chen. "A proof-of-concept study for developing integrated two-photon microscopic and magnetic resonance imaging modality at ultrahigh field of 16.4 tesla." Scientific Reports 7 (2017).
  • Kong, Lingjie, Jianyong Tang, Justin P. Little, Yang Yu, Tim Lammermann, Charles P. Lin, Ronald N. Germain, and Meng Cui. "Continuous volumetric imaging via an optical phase-locked ultrasound lens." Nature methods 12, no. 8 (2015): 759-762. Highlighted by Nature Photonics 9, 553 (2015).
  • Park, Jung-Hoon, Wei Sun, and Meng Cui. "High-resolution in vivo imaging of mouse brain through the intact skull." Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 112, no. 30 (2015): 9236-9241.
  • Si, Ke, Reto Fiolka, and Meng Cui. "Fluorescence imaging beyond the ballistic regime by ultrasound-pulse-guided digital phase conjugation." Nature photonics 6, no. 10 (2012): 657-661.
  • Tang, Jianyong, Ronald N. Germain, and Meng Cui. "Superpenetration optical microscopy by iterative multiphoton adaptive compensation technique." Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 109, no. 22 (2012): 8434-8439. Highlighted by Nature Methods 9, 642 (2012)

Topics of Potential Projects

We have two research projects.

  1. Transillumination 3D absorption tomography. The goal is to develop the imaging technology for whole brain function imaging.
  2. High throughput whole-brain photometry for large-scale recording of brain activity.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Students with background in one or several of the following areas are preferred.

  1. Optical science and engineering
  2. Robotics
  3. Machine vision and image processing
  4. Physics
  5. Computation imaging and image processing
64

Michael Sangid (msangid@purdue.edu)

AAE
Michael Sangid

Research Interests

Michael D Sangid is the Elmer F. Bruhn Associate Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics at Purdue University. His activities combine knowledge of materials science and solid mechanics, to solve complex problems in materials behavior and processing. His research group employs physics-based computational modeling and design tools, which are experimentally validated and verified. The goal is to improve our understanding and our tools for designing, processing, and lifing materials through simulation-based modeling of the microstructural defects. His research specifically focuses on (micro)structure to performance modeling for plasticity, fatigue, and fracture of metallic alloys and high temperature composites. Both material systems have direct applications in Aerospace Engineering. These modeling activities are complemented by an experimental component to his research, as he does advanced materials testing and characterization including digital image correlation, advanced microscopy, and high-energy x-ray diffraction. Thus, the most advanced characterization and interrogation methods are exercised at each scale to verify and validate model predictions, including four-dimensional mapping of ‘defect’ features, strain fields, and complex stress states within the materials.

Topics of Potential Projects

Many post processing techniques (such as shot peening, laser shock peening, and cold working of fastener holes) demonstrate a beneficial residual stress state in structural alloys. As such, materials and structures with these secondary processes have shown improved fatigue life. Yet, prior to these technologies translating to increased time between inspection schedules and extensions to the overall certified life of a structure, additional investigations are necessary to determine the reliability and accuracy of the damage tolerant assessment through these residual stress fields. We would perform in situ high energy x-ray diffraction (HEXD) ahead of an advancing crack during in situ fatigue crack growth experiments. The HEXD characterization enables relatively quick acquisition and high resolution (both in terms of the spatial fields and strain components) of the bulk residual stresses. The experiments will measure the residual stress relaxation ahead of the crack tip and will be extended to pertinent fatigue cases. Of equal importance is the reliability of the residual stress measurements and crack growth rates, thus to complement these experiments, the associated uncertainty quantification of the fatigue crack growth rates will be modeled.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Solid Mechanics Background, Some Experience in Coding in Matlab or Python, Interest in Finite Elements and Fatigue Experiments

65

Michael Titus (titus9@purdue.edu)

MSE
Michael Titus

Research Interests

high temperature structural alloys; high temperature deformation; physical metallurgy; accelerated alloy design; high-throughput thermodynamic calculations; high-throughput experiments

Topics of Potential Projects

Project 1) We seek to design new oxidation-resistant refractory complex, concentrated alloys, which are composed of five or more elements in roughly equal portions. In order to design new oxidation-resistant alloys, we are utilizing a machine learning framework that incorporates multi-resolution experiments and simulations. The aim of this project is to calculate the elemental activities as a function of temperature and composition in a high-throughput fashion using thermodynamic databases. These results will be fed into the machine learning framework to help in the design of new alloys.

Project 2) We seek to design new oxidation-resistant refractory complex, concentrated alloys, which are composed of five or more elements in roughly equal portions. In order to design new oxidation-resistant alloys, we seek to fabricate diffusion couples and multiples from refractory alloys with body-centered cubic crystal structures. The couples/multiples will be diffusion annealed to create a composition gradient, and the resulting specimen will be exposed to oxygen-bearing environments at elevated temperatures. The resulting oxide scale will be characterized via Raman / Fluorescence microscopy. These results will be used as inputs to a machine learning framework for accelerated materials design.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Project 1) We seek applicants with some background in programming in Python. Familiarity with Thermo-Calc SDKs (TC-Python), database management (.json or SQL formats), and data visualization is preferred.

Project 2) We seek applicants with a background in basic metallographic preparation skills. Prior experience in vacuum arc melting and/or Raman spectroscopy is preferred.

125

Miko Cakmak (cakmak@purdue.edu)

MSE / ME
Mukerrem Cakmak

Research Interests

Roll to roll manufacturing of functional films using electric and magnetic external fields.

Topics of Potential Projects

Rapid emergence of flexible electronics necessitates development of flexible functional materials . We at Purdue are working on production of functional ( piezoelectric, electrical, ionic, thermally conductive, magnetic) flexible thin films continuously using newly developed R2R manufacturing line located at Birck Nanotechnology center. These materials are produced by incorporating the functional nanoparticles into polymer precursors and use external electric and magnetic fields to create "forests" of nanocolumns of these particles in thickness direction. There are wide range of applications including transparent speakers, very low cost impact sensors.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Materials Science, Physics Chemical engineering. Polymer experience would be nice but not critical.

66

Ming Qu (mqu@purdue.edu)

CE
Ming Qu

Research Interests

Building science, building energy supply system.

Topics of Potential Projects

The development of cement-based thermoelectric materials for buildings

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Students from Material engineering, mechanical engineering

Good hands-on

Finite element modeling

67

Mirian Velay Lizancos (mvelayli@purdue.edu)

CE
Mirian Velay-Lizancos

Research Interests

Sustainability, cementitious materials, durability, and forensic engineering

Topics of Potential Projects

- Evolution of the rheological properties of sustainable cementitious materials.

- Study of how to improve sustainability construction material through the use of nano-additives.

- Develop new combined methods to improve the nondestructive evaluation of construction materials.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Interest on materials

Interest on learning and on performing test in the lab

68

Mohit Verma (msverma@purdue.edu)

ABE
Mohit Verma

Research Interests

microbiome, biosensors, soft robots (www.vermalab.com)

Topics of Potential Projects

Research on the relationship between biodiversity and function of microbiomes

The Verma lab works on assessing the relationships between the composition of microbiome and its function. The student will be expected to culture bacteria under specific conditions and monitor their growth. In addition, the student will be responsible for analyzing data and developing new models of interactions within the microbiome.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

microbiology, programming, bacterial cell culture, wet lab, data analysis

130

Monica Prezzi (mprezzi@purdue.edu)

CE
Monica Prezzi

Research Interests

Foundation engineering, ground improvement, recyclable materials, soil behavior, experimental testing.

Topics of Potential Projects

Test piles in a calibration chamber with image capabilities to study the effects of pile type, method of installation, sand density, and surcharge on pile capacity. Monotonic and cyclic loading can be investigated for piles subjected to axial and lateral loads.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

The student can learn while here how the tests are performed. Interest in image analyses and foundation engineering would be desirable.

69

Nadia Gkritza (nadia@purdue.edu)

CE/ABE
Konstantina Gkritza

Research Interests

https://engineering.purdue.edu/STSRG

STSRG's current work is mainly focused on gaining a deeper understanding of the behavioral intention to use existing transportation choices (such as passenger rail and ride-sharing services) as well as emerging energy and mobility choices (such as autonomous/shared autonomous vehicles and electric roadways). This understanding will enable a more accurate estimation of the anticipated impacts of such technologies. Of particular interest are the energy and environmental impacts of such technologies, which the research group is currently investigating. Another aspect of STSRG's current research lies in evaluating the role of transportation-related indicators (such as accessibility, connectivity, redundancy, and others) on community resilience to macro-economic shocks using both empirical data and theoretical models.

Topics of Potential Projects

--Ridesharing, Active Travel Behavior, and Personal Health: Implications for Shared Autonomous Vehicles

--Design of novel reconfigurable vehicle interiors for autonomous vehicles to meet the needs of older occupants

--Assessing the Impacts of Electric Vehicle Charging Behavior on Road Network Operations

--Policies And Technologies For Privacy Protection In The Era Of Ubiquitous Cameras

--Economic Resilience and Recovery in the U.S. Great Lakes Region: A Socioeconomic and Transportation Infrastructure Perspective

--Last Mile Delivery and Route Planning for Freight

--Assessing the travel demand and mobility impacts of disruptive transportation technologies in Indiana

--Public Acceptance of INDOT's transportation services

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

background in transportation engineering or planning; good grasp of statistics/econometrics; familiarity with GIS, Python, and statistical software; good communication skills

135

Nan Kong (nkong@purdue.edu)

BME
Nan Kong

Research Interests

health analytics, behavior sensing, health policy modeling

Topics of Potential Projects

  • health policy modeling (i.e., Using health care data to quantify the likely effects of changes and their varying impact can help improve policies around disease screening, prevention and treatment) in areas such as opioid treatment (provision of psychosocial in a mediation-assisted treatment program), and teen pregnancy (e.g., provision of contraceptive implants in school-based health centers). For the modeling, exciting healthcare data mining techniques will be applied.
  • behavior sensing and analytics, develop a digital platform to improve college students' mental health by developing a suite of smart connected health technologies, analytics, and models, which include smart phone based behavioral sensing, back-end databasing capacity for the digital platform, improve the analytics and visualization ability, develop smart phone based circle of trust type behavior nudging tool.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

For the health policy modeling course, Basic course on system dynamics and computer simulation; Anylogics/MATLAB/R

For the behavior sensing and analytics project Basic course on data mining/machine learning; Python/R/MATLAB

70

Nicole Key (nkey@purdue.edu)

ME
Nicole Key

Research Interests

Compressor aerodynamics. My lab has Experimental facilities to study compressor performance and flow-induced vibrations. We also use CFD to understand experimental data. We have 2 radial compressors and 1 axial and are also working to design subsystems to support new fan rig.

Topics of Potential Projects

Inlet Distortion effects on compressor performance.

Heat transfer effects on compressor efficiency.

Fan flutter.

Others.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Background in fluid mechanics a must. Background in turbomachinery desired.

71

Nicolo Michelusi (michelus@purdue.edu)

ECE
Nicolo Michelusi

Research Interests

Wireless communications

Distributed optimization and federated learning

UAV-assisted wireless networks

Reinforcement learning

Topics of Potential Projects

UAV-assisted wireless communications: in this project, we will investigate the design of UAV trajectories and the communication protocols in UAV-assisted wireless communication networks. We will optimize the network performance (energy consumption, throughput, delay) under uncertainty in users' distribution, mobility, channel statistics, using tools such as Markov decision theory, reinforcement learning.

Distributed optimization and federated learning: in this project, we will develop a rigorous theory on computational-communication complexity lower bounds of distributed algorithms in networked systems. We will investigate the design of provably convergent schemes in federated learning that make the best use of the limited computational and communication resources of devices. We will explore the impact of communication constraints such as quantization, wireless interference and fading, and address the design of schemes that are robust to these features.

Millimeter-wave wireless communications: in this project, we will investigate the design of beam-alignment schemes in highly mobile environments with high user density, so as to support device-to-device communications. We will investigate the design of antenna arrays to perform accurate beamforming, robust beam-alignment to combat interference and blockages, and the design of data-driven models to leverage mobility of users and channel dynamics, using tools such as machine learning, reinforcement learning, convex optimization.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Strong mathematical background and math skills

Strong interest in developing mathematical foundations of wireless comms.

Good programming skills (Matlab)

Communication skills: ability to communicate ideas both in speaking and writing

Curiosity to learn

72

Pavlos Vlachos (pvlachos@purdue.edu)

ME
Pavlos Vlachos

Research Interests

experimental fluid mechanics, multi-phase flows, biofluids and biomechanics, cardiovascular flows, tissue transport and drug delivery, tumor microenvironments, imaging and signal processing, uncertainty qualification

Topics of Potential Projects

  1. Development of advancement methods for volumetric time resolved particle image velocimetry and velocity uncertainty coupled with density measurements background orientated schlieren with applications to high speed, and density varying flows
  2. Methods for velocity and flow characterization in-vivo (in animals and/or humans) using ultrasound and/or 4-dimensional phase contrast MRI.
  3. Drug delivery and drug injection biomechanics for application to novel immunotherapies

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

basic knowledge of fluid mechanics, image and/or signal processing, and programming in Matlab and/or Python

73

Peide Ye (yep@purdue.edu)

ECE
Peide Ye

Research Interests

Semiconductor physics and devices, Nano-structures and nano-fabrications, Quantum/spin-transport, Atomic layer deposition, High-k/III-V and Ge device integration, High-performance III-V and Ge MOSFETs, High-k/2D integration, High-performance 2D devices, 2D spintronics, All oxide electronics, and wide bandgap semiconductor GaN and Ga2O3 power electronics.

Topics of Potential Projects

Novel ferroelectric materials and devices characterization for neuromorphic computing and AI applications.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Basic background in physics and chemistry and interests in neuromorphic computing and quantum computing

74

Peter Bermel (pbermel@purdue.edu)

ECE
Peter Bermel

Research Interests

Improving the performance of photovoltaic, thermophotovoltaic, and electronic systems using the principles of nanophotonics.

Key enabling techniques include electromagnetic and electronic theory, modeling, simulation, fabrication, and characterization.

Topics of Potential Projects

Potential projects include:

  1. Food & energy farms:One of the greatest global challenges today is to meet the food, energy, and water (FEW) needs of a growing population using existing resources. The challenge increases further once one eliminates unsustainable practices, and considers current land use constraints. For instance, typical solar energy installation casts deep shadows on the ground below, preventing many crops from growing nearby. There is an urgent need to develop new solutions to the global sustainability. In this project, we will aim to develop strategies to use locally collected sunlight to meet food, energy, and water needs. These strategies will entail an understanding of the best ways to design optics for these systems to allow simultaneous co-production; recognition of the requirements of modern agriculture, particularly in the Midwest; and discussions with affected stakeholders to identify and address potential concerns.
  2. Radiative cooling: radiative cooling is a passive cooling technique that uses optics to exchange heat with outer space through radiation into the sky. We will investigate new types of thermal emitters and PV cooling technologies for improved performance, and make this available for use by a broad audience, which will build on prior code developed by our group

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

All visiting students will need to have familiarity with the basics of electromagnetism, optics, and scientific computing. The ability and inclination to quickly learn a new scientific topic is desired. For coding, Python, C/C++, and MATLAB/Octave are our preferred languages. Working familiarity with Linux and shell scripts is also a plus.

75

Pramey Upadhyaya (prameyup@purdue.edu)

ECE
Pramey Upadhyaya

Research Interests

Magnetism, Spintronics, Quantum phenomena and devices, Unconventional computing and energy harvesting

Topics of Potential Projects

Topic 1: Quantum spintronics- The goal of this project is to develop fundamental theoretical/experimental understanding, as well as, design of novel quantum hybrids involving spin qubits and magnons for developing beyond state-of-the-art quantum technological capabilities including enhanced sensing of E-fields, performing scalable information processing, and microwave to optical transduction.

Topic 2: Noise-enhanced spintronics energy harvesters - The goal of this project is to exploit noise in nanomagnets, combined with the recently discovered spin-charge conversion mechanisms, for designing and testing fundamentally novel beyond state-of-the-art ambient rf energy harvesters.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Electrical engineering, mechanical engineering or background in physics. Students with knowledge in the basics of quantum/classical mechanics, programming and/or measurement background (such as in Python) are a plus.

76

Qingyan Chen (yanchen@purdue.edu)

ME
Qingyan Chen

Research Interests

Building physics

Topics of Potential Projects

Airflow in and around buildings (Using CFD to conduct simulations and experimental data to validate the results)

Building ventilation (Advanced ventilation systems such as personalized ventilation, chilled beams, etc.)

Thermal comfort in enclosed spaces (Study of thermal comfort in dynamic environment)

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Students with mechanical or civil engineering background have taken fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, and heat transfer

132

Rusi Taleyarkhan (rusi@purdue.edu)

NE
Rusi Taleyarkhan

Research Interests

Interdisciplinary engineering comprising nuclear-mechanical-chemical-electrical-materials sciences. Pertaining to novel sensors for radiation monitoring as applied for nuclear energy, safety, health physics and cancer therapy/diagnostics. Radiation tailored polymer sciences.

Topics of Potential Projects

Sensor systems for spectrometric detection of special nuclear materials via neutron/alpha/fission/photon signatures. Applications in energy, medicine, safeguards/safety/..

Tailored VOC-free polymers for use as coatings, building construction, adhesives and monitors for ionizing particles.

Above mentioned areas to include experimentation, theoretical work (inclusive of multi-physics modeling and simulations)

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Strong interest and background in physics, chemistry, nuclear-mechanical-..engineering.

Ability to work with electronics/coding/simulation/fabrication of devices a plus

106

Sanjay Rao (sanjay@purdue.edu)

ECE
Sanjay Rao

Research Interests

Computer Networking, Internet Protocols and Architecture, Internet Video, Network Management, Software-Defined Networks, Low-latency mobile applications

Topics of Potential Projects

(1) Analyzing large scale Internet traffic data using machine learning techniques to optimize Internet video performance

(2) Experimentation with 360 degree video

(3) Formal verification and synthesis techniques for computer networks.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

(1) Computer Engineering/Science background

(2) Course work in Computer Networks (Internet protocols/architecture)

77

Sara McMillan (mcmill@purdue.edu)

ABE
Sara Mcmillan

Research Interests

Watershed biogeochemistry, nutrient cycling in streams and rivers, ecosystem restoration, sustainable agricultural, resilient cities. Our research focuses on how humans impact nutrient cycling in aquatic and wetland ecosystems in cities, agriculture, and natural lands. We use ecological engineering principles to improve water quality and ecosystem health. We integrate field-based research with quantitative modeling approaches to develop solutions that advance the science of ecosystem restoration.

Topics of Potential Projects

Sustainable urban agriculture in Arequipa, Peru: we are linking hydrology, nutrient and carbon biogeochemistry, and contaminant fate and transport in floodplain and upland agriculture.

Floodplain restoration: through a coupled monitoring and modeling approach, we are characterizing the effects of large river floodplain restoration on elemental cycling and flood pulse attenuation.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Preferred skills: GIS, R

78

Satish Ukkusuri (sukkusur@purdue.edu)

CE
Satish Ukkusuri

Research Interests

Autonomous/connected vehicles modeling, Data science for cities, Resilience of Networks, Complex Systems, Human Mobility Modeling, Smart Cities, Disaster Management, Cyber Transportation Networks

Topics of Potential Projects

- Ride sharing in cities - novel algorithms and solution techniques

- Autonomous electric vehicles - platooning, energy consumption, impacts

- Complex networks - modeling of resilience of interdependent networks

- Network Modeling - Selfish routing, dynamic networks, social optimum, mechanism designs

- Smart logistics - Crowdshipping

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Good mathematical skills in optimization, game theory, data science. Coding in R and Python

79

Sergey Macheret (macheret@purdue.edu)

AAE
Sergey Macheret

Research Interests

Plasma science and technology; plasma antennas and radio-frequency systems; plasma for agriculture

Topics of Potential Projects

  1. Plasma-tunable radio-frequency devices: study how impedance of plasma discharges can be varied by the power and frequency of the applied signal.
  2. Plasma production of nitrate fertilizer: operate plasma in a "mist" of small water droplets and study how reducing the droplet size improves the efficiency of production of liquid nitrate.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Knowledge of electricity and magnetism, as well as RLC circuits, is required. Familiarity with electronic equipment is desirable.

80

Shaoshuai Mou (mous@purdue.edu)

AAE
Shaoshuai Mou

Research Interests

Multi-Agent Systems; Autonomy; Distributed Algorithms for Control/Optimization; Resilience and Cyber-Security; Application of Machine Learning and AI

Topics of Potential Projects

Students are welcome to formulate their own problems in the scope of autonomy and multi-agent systems, especially with applications of machine learning and AI. Some examples are as follows:

  1. Deep Learning for Autonomous Flight in Hostile Environment.
  2. AI-assisted Cyber-Attacks Detection in Drones' Operations
  3. Multi-agent autonomy enhanced by advanced machine learning algorithms

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Basic theories in control, optimization, networks and knowledge to machine learning and AI.

Programming skills using iRos, Python, Matlab

81

Shripad Revankar (shripad@purdue.edu)

NE
Shripad Revankar

Research Interests

Multi-phase flow and heat transfer, multiphase instrumentation, nuclear reactor thermalhydraulics, and safety, advanced nuclear reactor ( HTGR, SFR, MSR) design, and accident analysis, fuel cells, hydrogen generation and storage, renewable systems analysis , and nuclear-renewables hybrid system, multiphase flow in packed beds, phase change material heat storage, betavoltaic cell

Topics of Potential Projects

Thermal Hydraulics Projects:

(1) Steam generator tube leakages-

(2) Passive condensation in vertical tube

(3) High temperature gas cooled reactor transients accident

Chemical and Renewable and Hydrogen

(1) Thermochemical hydrogen generation

(2) Chemical Hydrogen storage

(3) Nuclear and renewable integrated systems

(4) Phase change material based heat storage systems

(5) Two phase flow in packed bed – instrumentation

Details:

(1) Choking of Subcooled flashing flow in narrow channels and steam generator tube cracks- Experimental program in existing test facility

(2) Study of non-condensation effect on film condensation in vertical tube –Experimental program for advanced boiling water reactor , Also Analytical modeling and CFD analysis

(3) Design of a scaled experimental test facility to model an advanced nuclear reactor-Scaling and hardware design of an advanced high temperature gas cooled reactor primary systems and reactor building.

(4) Analysis of gas distribution using CFD in a high temperature gas cooled reactor during depressurization transient

(5) Hybrid sulfur and sulfur iodine cycle hydrogen generation with solar and nuclear heat- modeling and analysis

(6) Hydrogen storage in Sodium borohydride and borane

(7) Nuclear coupled to renewable ( solar wind, concentrated, photovoltaic) hybrid system modeling

(8) Beta-voltaic cell design, testing and analysis

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Multi-phase flow and heat transfer, computational -MATLAB, CFD ( FLUENT, CFX, etc.,), thermalhydraulics experimental skill, experience in computer codes such as RELAP5, MELCOR, or equivalents. Modeling from first principles. Thermalhydraulics loop design and testing, data analysis,

103

Shweta Singh (singh294@purdue.edu)

ABE/EEE
Shweta Singh

Research Interests

Sustainability Science, Sustainable Engineering, Life Cycle Analysis, Input-Output Modeling,

Topics of Potential Projects

Circular Economy : Modeling how technology evolution will result into ensuring future circular economy and impact on ecological systems. In this project, we will utilize process modeling combined with Input-Output modeling, Machine learning and optimization to evaluate the possible pathways for transition to circular economy. Another possible topic is designing these systems for urban scale.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Chemical Engineering/Mechanical Engineering/Physics, Systems Engineering, Statistics and Programming knowledge (or willingness to learn ) - Python, Matlab. Interest in complex systems modeling approaches.

82

Song Zhang (szhang15@purdue.edu)

ME
Song Zhang

Research Interests

3D optical metrology, 3D video processing, autonomous vehicles

Topics of Potential Projects

Fully automated high-resolution 3D optical measurement technique

3D video compression and streaming for autonomous vehicles

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Basic optics, C++ programming, linear algebra, image processing

83

Steve Wereley (wereley@purdue.edu)

ME
Steven Wereley

Research Interests

Microfluidics, Nanofluidics, Electrokinetics, Optical trapping

Topics of Potential Projects

Projects are either computational or experimental in nature, sometimes both. Computational projects usually involve using COMSOL or Matlab to compute microscopic flow physics. Experimental projects involve using microscopes, cameras, and lasers to manipulate microscopic flows, predict their behavior, and observe their responses to system inputs. Application areas include biomedical engineering, manufacturing and controls.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Should have some experience with tools like matlab and some experience with basic laboratory procedures.

84

Sukru Guzey (guzey@purdue.edu)

CE
Sukru Guzey

Research Interests

Structural mechanics, finite element method, discontinuous Galerkin methods, plate and shell structures, structural stability, aboveground storage tanks, pressure vessels, piping

Topics of Potential Projects

Seismic Design of Aboveground Storage Tanks:

Cylindrical steel storage tanks are essential parts of infrastructure and industrial facilities used to store liquids. There are millions of welded steel tanks in the world storing flammable and or hazardous liquids in the petroleum, petrochemical, chemical and food industries across the world. Mechanical integrity and safe operation of these tanks very important because failure or loss of containment of such tanks may have catastrophic consequences to the human life and the environment. There are many procedures given in design standards to withstand the possible load effects, such as the hydrostatic pressure of the stored liquid, the external wind pressure, internal and external pressures due to process, and seismic events.

Investigators have a relatively well understanding on the load effects due to the hydrostatic, wind, and external/internal pressures due to process during normal operating levels. However, behavior of large, aboveground, steel, welded, liquid storage tanks under the presence of seismic loads introduce several critical failure criteria to the structure not exhibited during normal operating levels. Although many researchers investigated the liquid containers under dynamic excitations, the research on this subject still active. The bottleneck of this research topic is the intricate interplay between the flexible thin-walled tank wall and bottom, liquid inside the container, and the reinforced concrete or soil foundation supporting the container. Although, are many relatively recent research efforts, there is still a gap to find a viable solution to this problem.

To address this gap, the aim of this work is to perform a study on seismic design of aboveground storage tanks. Dr. Guzey and the research student shall perform analytical and numerical studies to study the behavior of liquid containers under dynamics excitations. We shall conduct numerical experiments using different levels of complexity and fidelity of multi-physics of these containers and compare the results to available analytical solutions, physical tests and current design standards. The research student will work under the mentorship of Dr. Guzey and a PhD student. The research student compile a literature review, perform numerical simulations using FEA computer program ABAQUS, and write scientific research papers and conference presentations.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Structural analysis, finite element analysis, structural dynamics, earthquake engineering, ABAQUS or other similar software.

114

Thomas Talavage (tmt@purdue.edu)

ECE / BME
Thomas Talavage

Research Interests

Functional neuroimaging (emphasis on fMRI) Traumatic brain injury Sport-related subconcussive injury Wireless telemetry for monitoring of physical activity

Topics of Potential Projects

Harmonization of MRI data across multiple imaging systems to improve multi-site studies - There is a strong current trend for multi-site neuroimaging studies to enhance statistical power and accelerate collection of large datasets. Data collected on a given MRI contain noise components specific to that system, and pooling of data would be expected to lead to increased variance due to system-specific noise. This project seeks to develop procedures to characterize and subsequently compensate for system-specific stationary noise components. The application of interest is the collection of pre- and post-concussion injury data at the multiple imaging sites comprising the Concussion Neuroimaging Consortium.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

  1. Digital signal/image processing
  2. Statistical testing, including non-parametric approaches
  3. Familiarity with Python and/or other scripting languages
  4. Competence in Unix
85

Tillmann Kubis (tkubis@purdue.edu)

ECE
Tillmann Kubis

Research Interests

Quantum transport

Charge, heat and spin transport in semiconductor nanodevices

Nonequilibrium Green's function method applications in various fields

High performance computation

Topics of Potential Projects

  1. Concept verification and design optimization of the cascade field effect and cascade tunneling field effect transistor:
    Our team has merged transistor and quantum cascade laser technologies into a new transistor concept. Switching performance predictions of the new transistor concept are needed to verify the concept. The multipurpose nanodevice simulation engine NEMO5 will be employed for this. Once the concept is verified, the device design will be optimized w.r.t best possible transistor performance. A collaboration with semiconductor industry is already prepared for project continuation after a prototype design is identified.
  2. Machine learning based policy tuning of the dynamic computational resource allocation engine:
    Recently we have developed a resource management system that dynamically adapts the resource allocation in massively parallelized simulations to optimally distribute the computational load of arbitrary application software among the available cores and nodes. While this system needs barely code intrusion to the respective application software, it needs benchmarking information prior to the simulation setups and executions. Automatic benchmarking will enable to 1) identify the key code positions that require interfaces to the resource manager and 2) feeds information to the control policy about the expected simulation runs. For frequently repeated production runs (such as for device optimization calculations), a machine learning algorithm will optimize steps 1) and 2) for the best possible hardware utilization.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Motivation to learn new concepts

Basic quantum mechanics and semiconductor physics (project 1)

Basic machine learning, coding and scripting knowledge (project 2)

Some experience with linux and scripting helpful for both projects

101

Timothee Pourpoint (timothee@purdue.edu)

AAE
Timothée Pourpoint

Research Interests

Aerospace propulsion systems, Rocket engine combustors, Liquid propellant injection systems, Hypergolic propellants, High pressure and hydrogen storage systems

Topics of Potential Projects

I have been invited to Rome, Italy this December to initiate discussions with the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Sapienza University of Rome. Purdue and Sapienza have collaborated before but this trip is aimed to renew ours ties and, hopefully, initiate a student exchange. We have common interests in the development and characterization of space thrusters. I'd like to discuss options for me to build on this program with this university.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Masters with experimental and/or modeling experience related to combustion.

86

Vaneet Aggarwal (vaneet@purdue.edu)

IE/ECE
Vaneet Aggarwal

Research Interests

Machine Learning, Communications and Networking

Topics of Potential Projects

- Reinforcement Learning

- Autonomous Transportation

- Cloud Computing

- Wireless ans Wired Networking

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

The ideal student would be good in programming and mathematical skills, with a preferred background in electrical engineering, computer science, statistics, and related fields.

87

Vaneet Aggarwal (vaneet@purdue.edu)

IE
Vaneet Aggarwal

Research Interests

Machine Learning

Communications and Networking

Autonomous Transportation

Topics of Potential Projects

We are interested in theory and applications of reinforcement learning in various domains, including networking, cloud computing, and transportation.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

The ideal student will have a background in any of CS, ECE, Stats, Math and related fields

88

Venkatesh Merwade (vmerwade@purdue.edu)

CE
Venkatesh Merwade

Research Interests

Hydrology, water resources, flooding

Topics of Potential Projects

  1. Creating automated workflows of processing hydrology data
  2. Creating hydrologic and flood models for data scarce regions in developing world

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Hydrology background with knowledge of Geographic Information Systems and python programming

89

Vikas Tomar (tomar@purdue.edu)

AAE
Vikas Tomar

Research Interests

High throughput shock loading tests

Battery Management System Design

Sensor Integration with Data Science

Topics of Potential Projects

Perform high throughput shock tests to relate large structure level shock failure with material features. Use data science to connect the scales. Use intelligent system knowledge to automate the whole process.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

BS mechanical engineering, aero engineering, industrial engineering or similar field.

90

Vincent Duffy (duffy@purdue.edu)

IE
Vincent Duffy

Research Interests

"Human-Automation Interaction" and "Applied Ergonomics and Safety". Two additional items I should have included in prior submission are 1. The VIP projects are setup for 2 credits each in 2020 Spring. 2. The two more formal descriptions of what students would do should have been included. Those are:

Human-Automation Interaction - The team will develop research skills and practical data mining skills for creating publications and applications in industry in areas with emerging need and limited expertise at present.

Applied Ergonomics and Safety - The team will develop research skills and practical data mining skills for creating publications and applications in industry in areas with emerging need and limited expertise at present.

In first semester, students will have a writing project with methods outlined for developing a 'systematic literature review' including bibliometric analysis and content analysis.

Hope this 2nd entry helps to clarify a couple of additional items. A list of topics options/emphasis for the three main themes is included below. Students can choose a project topic among those listed or modify in cooperation with instructor. Four Visiting Scholar/PostDocs that are currently on Purdue campus will be working with Prof. Duffy in support of the VIP Projects in Spring 2020.

Topics of Potential Projects

Human-Automation Interaction with emphasis on Mobile Computing

  1. Architectural design and infrastructure
  2. Artificial intelligence and mobile computing
  3. Automation, children and learning
  4. Automation and energy management
  5. Automation surprises: mobile computing
  6. Bibliometric analysis
  7. Business management and society
  8. Cognitive ergonomics and automation
  9. Cross-cultural design and social media
  10. Digital human modeling
  11. Ethics and transparency
  12. Face reader and emotional response
  13. Information technologies and privacy
  14. Learning technologies and social robots
  15. Mobile computing and games
  16. Mobile computing for the aged population
  17. Mobile sensors and assessment
  18. Physiological methods and measures
  19. User experience and usability
  20. Virtual and augmented reality
  21. Universal access
  22. Wearable technologies

Human-Automation Interaction with emphasis on Transportation

  1. Air traffic control and automation
  2. Artificial intelligence and transportation
  3. Automation and systems interaction
  4. Automation surprises: transportation
  5. Data science
  6. Design for inclusion and aged population
  7. Engineering psychology and augmented cognition
  8. Ergonomics in transportation
  9. Human error and reliability
  10. Injury prevention
  11. Industry 4.0
  12. Kansei engineering and automotive design
  13. Mobility and transport systems
  14. Occupant packaging
  15. Resilience and performance
  16. Robots and unmanned systems
  17. Simulation in transportation
  18. Software and services
  19. Space systems and habitability
  20. Sustainable urban planning
  21. Transportation service systems
  22. Trust and automation

Human-Automation Interaction with emphasis on Manufacturing, Services and User Experience

  1. Advanced production management and production control
  2. Affective and pleasurable design
  3. Artificial intelligence in industrial applications
  4. Augmented reality and multimodal approaches
  5. Automation surprises: manufacturing and services
  6. Cross-cultural design
  7. Cybersecurity
  8. Design communications and product lifecycle management
  9. Design for limited mobility
  10. Healthcare automation
  11. Human factors and simulation
  12. Human-Automation Interaction in apparel and textiles
  13. Internet of Things
  14. Metadata and data mining
  15. Modeling human performance
  16. Office automation in government and organizations
  17. Personal digital assistants
  18. Safety management and occupational ergonomics
  19. Social computing and social media
  20. Systems modeling and additive manufacturing
  21. Training and collaboration technologies
  22. Virtual environments and game design

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Interest in joining a research initiative in human factors and human-automation interaction. Students staying for a second semester will join a proposal writing exercise. In third semester, students will have opportunity for applications with industrial partner.

113

Wenzhuo Wu (wenzhuowu@purdue.edu)

IE
Wenzhuo Wu

Research Interests

Dr. Wu's research interests include design, manufacturing, and integration of 1-D and 2-D nanomaterials for applications in energy, nanoelectronics, wearable systems, and quantum devices.

Topics of Potential Projects

We aim to design and implement a wearable rectenna based on atomically-thin 2-D nanoribbon diodes, which can efficiently harvest ambient RF energy. The ultra-thin form factor of such nanoribbon rectenna allows the seamless integration with objects of arbitrary shapes and transforms them into self-powered smart objects with "power skins". The success of this work can enable ubiquitous energy harvesting and wireless charging for self-powered wearable and implantable devices using the existing wireless infrastructure as the energy hotspot.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Students with background and expertise in one of the following areas: microfabrication; design and characterization of RF devices; nanoelectronics; device physics; 2-D materials; wearable device.

112

Wenzhuo Wu (wenzhuowu@purdue.edu)

IE
Wenzhuo Wu

Research Interests

Dr. Wu's research interests include design, manufacturing, and integration of 1-D and 2-D nanomaterials for applications in energy, nanoelectronics, wearable systems, and quantum devices. Research profile

Topics of Potential Projects

This project aims to design, implement, and demonstrate a material technology for additive manufacturing of solution-synthesized two-dimensional (2-D) piezoelectric materials into designer architected metamaterials capable of ubiquitous energy harvesting, sensing, and actuation. The success of this project will enable a new platform for additive manufacturing of a broad range of piezoelectric metadevices with pervasive impacts on numerous technologies, e.g., self-powered sensors, soft robotics, and human-machine interface.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Students with background and expertise in one of the following areas: microfabrication; additive manufacturing; 2-D materials; wearable device; piezoelectric materials and devices.

109

Wenzhuo Wu (wenzhuowu@purdue.edu)

IE
Wenzhuo Wu

Research Interests

Dr. Wu's research interests include design, manufacturing, and integration of 1-D and 2-D nanomaterials for applications in energy, nanoelectronics, wearable systems, and quantum devices. Research profile

Topics of Potential Projects

This project aims to explore and demonstrate a monolithic quantum electronics platform based on the scalable nanomanufacturing and deterministic integration of 2-D topological materials based quantum devices. The success of this research will not only open the doors for manufacturing a new class of 2-D quantum materials with tunable properties but also create a paradigm shift in the design and implementation of new device concepts for quantum electronics.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Students with background and expertise in one of the following areas: microfabrication; quantum electronics; device physics; 2-D materials; topological materials; characterization of quantum devices.

92

Xianfan Xu (xxu@ecn.purdue.edu)

ME/EE
Xianfan Xu

Research Interests

nanoscale heat transfer in 2D materials

ultrafast heat transfer (fs time resolved)

nanoscale 3D printing

Topics of Potential Projects

nanoscale heat transfer in 2D materials

ultrafast heat transfer (fs time resolved)

nanoscale 3D printing

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

mechanical or electrical engineering, or physics

104

Xiaoqian Wang (joywang@purdue.edu)

ECE
Xiaoqian (Joy) Wang

Research Interests

Interpretable machine learning, biomedical data science

Topics of Potential Projects

It is common in real world applications that unlabeled data are abundant while acquiring labels is extremely difficult. However, training with limited labeled data may cause the predictive model to overfit or get stuck in a bad local optima due to the lack of abundant supervision. In this project, we propose various mathematical strategies to improve the predictive performance without increasing the labeling cost. We will:

1) design new generative models in semi-supervised and unsupervised learning to learn from the abundant unlabeled data and provide auxiliary information for prediction;

2) propose new graph neural networks to uncover data correlation and infer data labels in a graph structure.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

1. Strong motivation for research;

2. Good background in math and programming;

3. Courses must cover at least one of the following subjects: machine learning, statistics, linear algebra, optimization, Python programming, etc;

4. Good communication skills and team work spirit."

105

Xinghang Zhang (xzhang98@purdue.edu)

MSE
Xinghang Zhang

Research Interests

Mechanical behavior of nanostructured metals and ceramics; radiation damage in nanomaterials; Nanomechanics/nanoindentation Sputtering deposition of thin films; 3D printing of metals Ceramic nanocomposites

Topics of Potential Projects

"Mechanical behavior of nanocrystalline metals and ceramics prepared by sputtering or flash sintering;

1) Y. Zhang, Q. Li, S. Xue, J. Ding, T. Niu, R. Su, H. Wang, X. Zhang, Size dependent strengthening in high-strength nanotwinned Al/Ti multilayers, Acta Materialia, 175 (2019) 466-476.

2) Jaehun Cho, Jin Li, Z. Shang, Jack M. Lopez, William J. Jarosinski, M.M. Gentleman, Vaishak Viswanathan, S. Xue, H. Wang, X. Zhang, Comparison of temperature dependent deformation mechanisms of 8YSZ thermal barrier coatings prepared by air-plasma-spray and D-gun thermal spray: an in situ study, Journal of the European Ceramic Society, 39 (2019) 3120-3128.

Radiation damage in nanomaterials;

1) Z Shang, C Fan, S Xue, Jie Ding, Jin Li, T Voisin, YM Wang, H Wang, X Zhang, Response of solidification cellular structures in additively manufactured 316 stainless steel to heavy ion irradiation: an in situ study, Materials Research Letters, 7 (2019) 290-297, DOI: 10.1080/21663831.2019.1604442;

2) Cuncai Fan, Qiang Li, Jie Ding, Yanxiang Liang, Zhongxia Shang, Jin Li, Ruizhe Su, Jaehun Cho, Di Chen, Yongqiang Wang, Jian Wang, Haiyan Wang, Xinghang Zhang, Helium irradiation induced ultra-high strength nanotwinned Cu with nanovoids, Acta Materialia 177 (2019) 107-120.

Characterization of 3D printed metallic materials (steels, Ni alloys)

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

1. Materials science background (SEM, XRD etc.)

2. Self-motivated

3. Hard working

4. Team player

5. Effective communication

6. Leadership desirable, not necessary

93

Xiulin Ruan (ruan@purdue.edu)

ME
Xiulin Ruan

Research Interests

  1. Nanoscale heat transfer and energy conversion
  2. Multiscale multiphysics simulations of nanomaterials for energy applications
  3. Machine learning methods in energy applications
  4. Radiative cooling with nanomaterials
  5. Photovoltaic nanomaterials: simulation, synthesis, and devices
  6. Thermoelectric nanomaterials: simulation, synthesis and devices

Topics of Potential Projects

  1. Radiative cooling using nanomaterials: Radiative cooling relies on surfaces that have high emissivity in the sky window of the atmosphere (8 to 13 microns) and high reflectivity in the solar spectrum. Such surfaces can strongly reflect the sunlight and emit heat to the deep sky, hence have the potential to be cooled below the ambient temperature without energy input. This technology is promising to reduce the air conditioning cost and address the global warming challenge. The focus of this project is to develop nanocomposites with engineered optical properties to enhance the radiative cooling performance. The project can involve experimental and/or theoretical components.
  2. Multiscale simulations of thermal conductivity of nanomaterials with machine learning: Tailored thermal conductivities are desired in many applications such as thermal management of electronics and thermal barrier coatings. In this project, we will use a range of simulation methods including first principles calculations, molecular dynamics, Boltzmann transport equation to predict thermal conductivity of technologically important materials. Machine learning methods will be used to enable high-throughput search of such materials.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Experiences in heat transfer, materials sciences, computational methods, physics, or optics are desired but not required.

94

Yong Chen (yongchen@purdue.edu)

ECE
Yong Chen

Research Interests

Quantum Materials and Devices; Graphene and 2D materials; Topological Insulators and Topological Materials; Spintronics; Experimental Quantum Computing; Superconducting Devices; Quantum Emitters and Quantum Photonics; Cold Atom BEC based quantum matter and devices;

Quantum Control.

Topics of Potential Projects

Applications of Qubits, Quantum Sensing and Quantum Control. Fabricate and characterize electronic or optical qubits and using them as quantum sensors for materials research, security or other applications. Also of interests are quantum control of atomic, chemical processes.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

One of the following;

  1. nanodevice fabrication;
  2. low temperature transport measurements;
  3. quantum/nonlinear optics measurements
115

Young Kim (youngkim@purdue.edu)

BME
Young Kim

Research Interests

Given our highly connected nature, it is a formidable challenge to provide and maintain hardware and information security. Even though security attacks in cyberspace and physical space are not new, current defense applications require unprecedentedly high levels of security for devices, individuals, and communications. The recent advances in quantum computing are expected to break many current encryption used for distributing information securely. In addition, counterfeit medicines are a fundamental security problem. The problem of counterfeit medicines is not new, but is becoming a tremendous burden to our society. Counterfeit medicines of both lifestyle drugs and lifesaving drugs are increasingly being produced in developed and developing countries, in part due to the increased public use of online pharmacies. It is estimated that counterfeit medicines account for 10% of the global pharmaceutical trade. Unfortunately, counterfeiters and illegitimate sellers continue to improve their packaging and manufacturing. More importantly, anti-counterfeiting and authentication using software algorithms or hardware protocols will become highly vulnerable in the post-quantum era. In this respect, quantum and biological materials could augment a variety of security capabilities for existing and emerging threats.

Topics of Potential Projects

We will study augment two security capabilities: random number generators (RNGs) and physically unclonable functions (PUFs): i) Random numbers are generated by one-way mathematical functions in software algorithms. Such random numbers are robust enough in the in classical era, but the recent advances in quantum computing will put them at high risk. Theoretically, truly random numbers with high entropy originated from quantum mechanics can make cryptographic primitives strong enough to tolerate a quantum computer attack to an extent. It should be noted that many RNGs are claimed to be quantum RNGs, but none of them are truly quantum based on quantum materials yet. ii) As a cryptographic primitive, PUFs provide 'digital fingerprints' where information is usually read from a static entropy (physical disorder). In particular, a PUF has multiple pairs consisting of an input challenge and an output response that are unique and unclonable. When a PUF is integrated or embedded within a system (e.g. package), this allows the identity to be uniquely authenticated.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Experience in physical optics, biomedical optics, and Matlab coding.

95

Yung Shin (shin@purdue.edu)

ME
Yung Shin

Research Interests

Laser processing of materials, additive manufacturing, advanced manufacturing, data-driven science

Topics of Potential Projects

additive manufacturing of polymers or metals

In this study, the student will work on studying the microstructure-property relationships of additive manufactured parts. Another potential application is topology design of additively manufactured parts.

laser micromachining or welding of transparent materials

In this project, the student will investigate the effects of process parameters of laser machined or welded transparent materials. Either CO2 or fiber laser will be used with a computer controlled positioning stage and the results will be analyzed by optical microscope, optical profiler and scanning electron microscope. In addition, some numerical modeling using Fluent or ANSYS will be required.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Some experiences in lasers, additive manufacturing or numerical modeling are preferred.

96

Yung-Hsiang Lu (yunglu@purdue.edu)

ECE
Yung-Hsiang Lu

Research Interests

Computer Vision, Low-Power Systems, Cloud Computing.

Topics of Potential Projects

  1. This project investigates computer vision solutions that can perform the following tasks in an embedded computer (small enough to be inside a typical camera) Obtain aggregate information (such as the number of people and their genders). Detect faces and encrypt the faces before sending the data to storage. The sensitive data (faces) never leaves the camera.
  2. Use real-time video analytics to detect dangerous behavior or safety violation in workplace (such as factories), raise alerts to prevent injury, or provide post-event analysis to prevent future occurrences. The initial phase of the project aims to answer "where are the people?"

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Computer programming. Machine learning / artificial intelligence

97

Zoltan Nagy (zknagy@purdue.edu)

ChE
Zoltan Nagy

Research Interests

Process Control

Process Systems Engineering

Pharmaceutical Manufacturing

Particle Technology

Topics of Potential Projects

The project would involve the modeling and control of a pharmaceutical manufacturing process. Advanced control and process intensification concept will be evaluated for the manufacturing of pharmaceutical compounds. The aim is to develop a general framework for controlling properties of crystalline active pharmaceutical ingredients, including size and shape distribution and polymorphic form. The project can provides the possibility to perform experimental validation of the control approaches using state of the art laboratory batch and continuous crystallization systems for the production of model pharmaceuticals.

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Knowledge in matlab or similar programming language is preferable but not required.

98

Zubin Jacob (zjacob@purdue.edu)

ECE
Zubin Jacob

Research Interests

www.electrodynamics.org

Topics of Potential Projects

- Spin qubits: The potential student will work on spin qubits for metrology

- Ultrafast laser: Another project is related to pump-probe spectroscopy

- Topological photonics: Fundamental research on topological phenomena and density functional theory

Student Requirements / Skills Needed

Any one of the following

- Photonics

- Magnetometry

- Lasers

- Spectroscopy

-Computational electromagnetism