DecisionTree (version 3.0, 2015-May-18)

DecisionTree.py
 
Version: 3.0
   
Author: Avinash Kak (kak@purdue.edu)
 
Date: 2015-May-18
 
 
Download Version 3.0:  gztar   bztar

 
     Total number of downloads (all versions): 5261
     This count is automatically updated at every rotation of
     the weblogs (normally once every two to four days)
     Last updated: Wed Feb 20 06:10:01 EST 2019

View version 3.0 code for the main class in browser  
View version 3.0 code for bagging in browser  
 
 
Switch to Version 3.0.1



CONTENTS:
  CHANGES
  USAGE
  INTRODUCTION
  WHAT PRACTICAL PROBLEM IS SOLVED BY THIS MODULE?
  SYMBOLIC FEATURES VERSUS NUMERIC FEATURES
  FEATURES WITH NOT SO "NICE" STATISTICAL PROPERTIES
  TESTING THE QUALITY OF YOUR TRAINING DATA
  HOW TO MAKE THE BEST CHOICES FOR THE CONSTRUCTOR PARAMETERS
  DECISION TREE INTROSPECTION
  METHODS
  THE INTROSPECTION API
  BULK CLASSIFICATION OF DATA RECORDS
  HOW THE CLASSIFICATION RESULTS ARE DISPLAYED
  USING BAGGING
  THE Examples DIRECTORY
  THE BaggingExamples DIRECTORY
  INSTALLATION
  BUGS
  ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
  AUTHOR
  COPYRIGHT

 
 
CHANGES:
 
  Version 3.0
 
    Version 3.0 adds bagging to the DecisionTree module. If your training
    dataset is large enough, you can ask the module to construct multiple
    decision trees using data bags extracted from your dataset.  The module
    can show you the results returned by the individual decision trees and
    also the results obtained by taking a majority vote of the
    classification decisions made by the trees.  You can specify any
    arbitrary extent of overlap between the data bags.
 
  Version 2.3.4
 
    There was an error in the packaging of version 2.3.3 of this module.
    The error related to how the `packages' keyword was specified in
    setup.py.  This version fixes that error.
 
  Version 2.3.3:
 
    The purpose of this version is merely to mention that you do NOT need
    to double-quote the entries in your CSV training files. The older
    versions of this module required the rows of a CSV file to be in the
    following sort of a format:
 
        "","pgtime","pgstat","age","eet","g2","grade","gleason","ploidy"
        "1",6.1,0,64,2,10.26,2,4,"diploid"
        "2",9.4,0,62,1,NA,3,8,"aneuploid"
        ...
        ...
 
    Except at one place --- the upper left-hand corner --- you can get rid
    of all the double quotes.  That is, the module will be happy to learn
    from a file that looks like:
 
        "",pgtime,pgstat,age,eet,g2,grade,gleason,ploidy
        1,6.1,0,64,2,10.26,2,4,diploid
        2,9.4,0,62,1,NA,3,8,aneuploid
        ...
        ...
 
    The Examples directory contains the following two training files that
    do the same thing: the old style 'stage3cancer.csv' and the new style
    'stage3cancer_noquotes.csv'.  The module works equally well with both
    CSV formats. (If you are new to this module, the first row of a CSV
    training file bears the names of the features except for one entry
    which is the column heading for the class labels in your data.)
 
  Version 2.3.2:
 
    The introspection capability in this version packs more of a punch.
    For each training data sample, you can now figure out not only the
    decision-tree nodes that are affected directly by that sample, but also
    those nodes that are affected indirectly through the generalization
    achieved by the probabilistic modeling of the data.  The Examples
    directory of this version includes additional scripts that illustrate
    these enhancements to the introspection capability.  See the section
    "The Introspection API" for a declaration of the introspection related
    methods, old and new.
 
  Version 2.3.1:
 
    This version has a bug fix for the decision-tree introspection
    capability that was added to the module in Version 2.3. Also changed in
    this version are the names of the two scripts in the Examples directory
    that illustrate introspection.  The new names are "introspection_at_one
    _node.py" and "introspection_in_a_loop.py".
 
  Version 2.3:
 
    In response to requests from several users, this version includes a new
    capability: You can now ask the module to introspect about the
    classification decisions returned by the decision tree.  Toward that
    end, the module includes a new class named DTIntrospection.  Perhaps
    the most important bit of information you are likely to seek through DT
    introspection is the list of the training samples that fall directly in
    the portion of the feature space that is assigned to a node.  CAVEAT:
    When training samples are non-uniformly distributed in the underlying
    feature space, IT IS POSSIBLE FOR A NODE TO EXIST EVEN WHEN NO TRAINING
    SAMPLES FALL IN THE PORTION OF THE FEATURE SPACE ASSIGNED TO THE NODE.
    (This is the entire point of the generalization achieved by
    probabilistic modeling of the training data.)  For additional
    information related to DT introspection, see the section titled
    "DECISION TREE INTROSPECTION" in this documentation page.
 
  Version 2.2.6:
 
    Removed a serious bug in the method get_training_data_from_dat() that
    is used to read the training data from `.dat' files.  The class naming
    convention internally in the code is that it is a concatenation of the
    header of the column that contains the class labels and the actual
    class name as mentioned in each row of the training data. There was a
    problem with this concatenation. Another very important bug fix was in
    the method probability_of_feature_value(). The probability calculation
    in the previous versions was erroneous for those features that acquired
    zero values.  The users of this module may not have noticed this error
    in the past if the zero values for the features occurred relatively
    infrequently.  This error has now been fixed.
 
  Version 2.2.5:
 
    If you are not using the synthetic data generation feature of this
    module, the changes made in this version do not affect you. The code
    that was changed is all in the class TrainingDataGeneratorNumeric.  The
    changes to this class remove an important bug related to the ordering
    of the feature names that are read from a user-supplied parameter
    file. The basic Decision Tree construction and classification code
    remains unchanged.
 
  Version 2.2.4:
 
    This version should prove more robust when the probability distribution
    for the values of a feature is expected to be heavy-tailed; that is,
    when the supposedly rare observations can occur with significant
    probabilities.  A new option in the DecisionTree constructor lets the
    user specify the precision with which the probability distributions
    are estimated for such features.
 
  Version 2.2.3:
 
    This version fixes a bug that was caused by the explicitly set zero
    values for numerical features being misconstrued as "false" in the
    conditional statements in some of the method definitions.
 
  Version 2.2.2:
 
    In response to requests from users, this version includes scripts in
    the Examples directory that demonstrate how to carry out bulk
    classification of all your test data records placed in a CSV file in
    one fell swoop.  Also included are scripts that demonstrate the same
    for the data records placed in the old-style `.dat' files.  The main
    module code remains unchanged.
 
  Version 2.2.1:
 
    The changes made are all in the part of the module that is used for
    evaluating the quality of training data through a 10-fold cross
    validation test.  The previous version used the default values for the
    constructor parameters when constructing the decision trees in each
    iteration of the test. The new version correctly uses the user-supplied
    values.
 
  Version 2.2:
 
    This version fixes a bug discovered in the best feature calculator
    function. This bug was triggered by certain conditions related to the
    distribution of values for the features in a training data file.
    Additionally, and VERY IMPORTANTLY, Version 2.2 allows you to test the
    quality of your training data by running a 10-fold cross-validation
    test on the data.  This test divides all of the training data into ten
    parts, with nine parts used for training a decision tree and one part
    used for testing its ability to classify correctly. This selection of
    nine parts for training and one part for testing is carried out in all
    of the ten different possible ways.  This testing functionality in
    Version 2.2 can also be used to find the best values to use for the
    constructor parameters entropy_threshold, max_depth_desired, and
    symbolic_to_numeric_cardinality_threshold.
 
  Version 2.1:
 
    This is a cleaned up version of v. 2.0 of the module. Should run more
    efficiently for large training data files that contain both numeric and
    symbolic features.
 
  Version 2.0:
 
    This was a major rewrite of the DecisionTree module.  This revision was
    prompted by a number of users wanting to see numeric features
    incorporated in the construction of decision trees.  So here it is!
    This version allows you to use either purely symbolic features, or
    purely numeric features, or a mixture of the two. (A feature is numeric
    if it can take any floating-point value over an interval.)
 
  Version 1.7.1:
 
    This version includes a fix for a bug that was triggered by certain
    comment words in a training data file.  This version also includes
    additional safety checks that are useful for catching errors and
    inconsistencies in large training data files that do not lend
    themselves to manual checking for correctness.  As an example, the new
    version makes sure that the number of values you declare in each sample
    record matches the number of features declared at the beginning of the
    training data file.
 
  Version 1.7:
 
    This version includes safety checks on the consistency of the data you
    place in your training data file.  When a training data file contains
    thousands of records, it is difficult to manually check that you used
    the same class names in your sample records that you declared at the
    top of your training file or that the values you have for your features
    are legal vis-a-vis the earlier declarations regarding such values in
    the training file.  Another safety feature incorporated in this version
    is the non-consideration of classes that are declared at the top of the
    training file but that have no sample records in the file.
 
  Version 1.6.1:
 
    Fixed a bug in the method that generates synthetic test data.
 
  Version 1.6:
 
    This version includes several upgrades: The module now includes code
    for generating synthetic training and test data for experimenting with
    the DecisionTree classifier.  Another upgrade in the new version is
    that, after training, a decision tree can now be used in an interactive
    mode in which the user is asked to supply answers for the feature tests
    at the nodes as the classification process descends down the tree.
 
  Version 1.5:
 
    This is a Python 3.x compliant version of the DecisionTree module.
    This version should work with both Python 2.x and Python 3.x.
 
  Version 1.0:
 
    This is a Python implementation of the author's Perl module
    Algorithm::DecisionTree, Version 1.41.  The Python version should work
    faster for large decision trees since it uses probability and entropy
    caching much more extensively than Version 1.41 of the Perl module.
    (Note: I expect my next release of the Perl module to catch up with
    this Python version in terms of performance.)
 
 
 
USAGE:
 
    If your training data includes numeric features (a feature is numeric
    if it can take any floating point value over an interval), you are
    expected to supply your training data through a CSV file and your call
    for constructing an instance of the DecisionTree class will look like:
 
        training_datafile = "stage3cancer.csv"
 
        dt = DecisionTree.DecisionTree
                                training_datafile = training_datafile,
                                csv_class_column_index = 2,
                                csv_columns_for_features = [3,4,5,6,7,8],
                                entropy_threshold = 0.01,
                                max_depth_desired = 8,
                                symbolic_to_numeric_cardinality_threshold = 10,
             )
 
    The constructor option `csv_class_column_index' informs the module as
    to which column of your CSV file contains the class label.  THE COLUMN
    INDEXING IS ZERO BASED.  The constructor option
    `csv_columns_for_features' specifies which columns are to be used for
    feature values.  The first row of the CSV file must specify the names
    of the features.  See examples of CSV files in the `examples'
    subdirectory.
 
    The option `symbolic_to_numeric_cardinality_threshold' is also
    important.  For the example shown above, if an ostensibly numeric
    feature takes on only 10 or fewer different values in your training
    datafile, it will be treated like a symbolic feature.  The option
    `entropy_threshold' determines the granularity with which the entropies
    are sampled for the purpose of calculating entropy gain with a
    particular choice of decision threshold for a numeric feature or a
    feature value for a symbolic feature.
 
    After you have constructed an instance of the DecisionTree class as
    shown above, you read in the training data file and initialize the
    probability cache by calling:
 
        dt.get_training_data()
        dt.calculate_first_order_probabilities()
        dt.calculate_class_priors()
 
    Next you construct a decision tree for your training data by calling:
 
        root_node = dt.construct_decision_tree_classifier()
 
    where root_node is an instance of the DTNode class that is also defined
    in the module file.  Now you are ready to classify a new data record.
    Let's say that your data record looks like:
 
        test_sample  = ['g2 = 4.2',
                        'grade = 2.3',
                        'gleason = 4',
                        'eet = 1.7',
                        'age = 55.0',
                        'ploidy = diploid']
 
    You can classify it by calling:
 
        classification = dt.classify(root_node, test_sample)
 
    The call to `classify()' returns a reference to a hash whose keys are
    the class names and the values the associated classification
    probabilities.  This hash also includes another key-value pair for the
    solution path from the root node to the leaf node at which the final
    classification was carried out.
 
    If your features are purely symbolic, you can continue to use the same
    constructor syntax that was used in the older versions of this module.
    However, your old `.dat' training files will not work with the new
    version.  The good news is that with just a small fix, you can continue
    to use them.  The fix and why it was needed is described in the file
    README_for_dat_files in the `Examples' directory.  If you are going to
    use a `.dat' file for supplying the training data, your constructor
    syntax is likely to look like:
 
        training_datafile = "training.dat"
 
        dt = DecisionTree.DecisionTree
                                training_datafile = training_datafile,
                                entropy_threshold = 0.01,
                                max_depth_desired = 5,
             )
 
    You'd still need to make the following calls for reading in the
    training data, for initializing the probability cache, and for
    constructing the decision tree:
 
        dt.get_training_data()
        dt.calculate_first_order_probabilities()
        dt.calculate_class_priors()
        root_node = dt.construct_decision_tree_classifier()
 
    Now your test sample is likely to look like:
 
        test_sample = ['exercising=never', 
                       'smoking=heavy', 
                       'fatIntake=heavy', 
                       'videoAddiction=heavy']
 
    You'd now call the calssifier as before: 
 
        classification = dt.classify(root_node, test_sample)
 
    A decision tree can quickly become much too large (and much too slow to
    construct and to yield classification results) if the total number of
    features is large and/or if the number of different possible values for
    the symbolic features is large.  You can control the size of the tree
    through the constructor options `entropy_threshold' and
    `max_depth_desired'. The latter option sets the maximum depth of your
    decision tree to max_depth_desired value.  The parameter
    `entropy_threshold' sets the granularity with which the entropies are
    sampled.  Its default value is 0.001.  The larger the value you choose
    for entropy_threshold, the smaller the tree.
 
 
INTRODUCTION:
 
    DecisionTree is a Python module for constructing a decision tree from a
    training data file containing multidimensional data in the form of a
    table. In one form or another, decision trees have been around for over
    fifty years. From a statistical perspective, they are closely related
    to classification and regression by recursive partitioning of
    multidimensional data. Early work that demonstrated the usefulness of
    such partitioning of data for classification and regression can be
    traced to the work of Terry Therneau in the early 1980's in the
    statistics community, and to the work of Ross Quinlan in the mid 1990's
    in the machine learning community,
 
    For those not familiar with decision tree ideas, the traditional way to
    classify multidimensional data is to start with a feature space whose
    dimensionality is the same as that of the data.  Each feature measures
    a specific attribute of an entity.  You use the training data to carve
    up the feature space into different regions, each corresponding to a
    different class.  Subsequently, when you try to classify a new data
    sample, you locate it in the feature space and find the class label of
    the region to which it belongs.  One can also give the data point the
    same class label as that of the nearest training sample. This is
    referred to as the nearest neighbor classification. There exist
    hundreds of variations of varying power on these two basic approaches
    to the classification of multidimensional data.
 
    A decision tree classifier works differently.  When you construct a
    decision tree, you select for the root node a feature test that
    partitions the training data in a way that causes maximal
    disambiguation of the class labels associated with the data.  In terms
    of information content as measured by entropy, such a feature test
    would cause maximum reduction in class entropy in going from all of the
    training data taken together to the data as partitioned by the feature
    test.  You then drop from the root node a set of child nodes, one for
    each partition of the training data created by the feature test at the
    root node. When your features are purely symbolic, you'll have one
    child node for each value of the feature chosen for the feature test at
    the root.  When the test at the root involves a numeric feature, you
    find the decision threshold for the feature that best bipartitions the
    data and you drop from the root node two child nodes, one for each
    partition.  Now at each child node you pose the same question that you
    posed when you found the best feature to use at the root: Which feature
    at the child node in question would maximally disambiguate the class
    labels associated with the training data corresponding to that child
    node?
 
    As the reader would expect, the two key steps in any approach to
    decision-tree based classification are the construction of the decision
    tree itself from a file containing the training data, and then using
    the decision tree thus obtained for classifying new data.
 
    What is cool about decision tree classification is that it gives you
    soft classification, meaning it may associate more than one class label
    with a given data record.  When this happens, it may mean that your
    classes are indeed overlapping in the underlying feature space.  It
    could also mean that you simply have not supplied sufficient training
    data to the decision tree classifier.  For a tutorial introduction to
    how a decision tree is constructed and used, see
 
    https://engineering.purdue.edu/kak/Tutorials/DecisionTreeClassifiers.pdf
 
 
WHAT PRACTICAL PROBLEM IS SOLVED BY THIS MODULE?
 
    If you are new to the concept of a decision tree, their practical
    utility is best understood with an example that only involves symbolic
    features.  However, as mentioned earlier, versions 2.0 and higher of
    this module handle both symbolic and numeric features.
 
    Consider the following scenario: Let's say you are running a small
    investment company that employs a team of stockbrokers who make
    buy/sell decisions for the customers of your company.  Assume that your
    company has asked the traders to make each investment decision on the
    basis of the following five criteria:
 
            price_to_earnings_ratio   (P_to_E)
 
            price_to_sales_ratio      (P_to_S)
 
            return_on_equity          (R_on_E)
 
            market_share              (M_S)
 
            sentiment                 (S)
 
    Since you are the boss, you keep track of the buy/sell decisions made
    by the individual traders.  But one unfortunate day, all of your
    traders decide to quit because you did not pay them enough.  So what
    are you to do?  If you had a module like the one here, you could still
    run your company and do so in such a way that your company would, on
    the average, perform better than any of the individual traders who
    worked for you previously.  This is what you would need to do: You
    would pool together the individual trader buy/sell decisions you
    accumulated during the last one year.  This pooled information is
    likely to look like:
 
 
      example      buy/sell     P_to_E     P_to_S     R_on_E     M_S     S
      ====================================================================
 
      example_1     buy          high       low        medium    low    high
      example_2     buy          medium     medium     low       low    medium
      example_3     sell         low        medium     low       high   low
      ....
      ....
 
    This data would constitute your training file. Assuming that this training
    file is called 'training.dat', you would need to feed this file
    into the module by calling:
 
        dt = DecisionTree( training_datafile = "training.dat" )
 
        dt.get_training_data()
 
        dt.calculate_first_order_probabilities_for_numeric_features()
 
        dt.calculate_class_priors()
 
    Subsequently, you would construct a decision tree by calling:
 
        root_node = dt.construct_decision_tree_classifier()
 
    Now you and your company (with practically no employees) are ready to
    service the customers again. Suppose your computer needs to make a
    buy/sell decision about an investment prospect that is best described
    by:
 
        price_to_earnings_ratio   =  low
        price_to_sales_ratio      =  very_low
        return_on_equity          =  none
        market_share              =  medium    
        sentiment                 =  low
 
    All that your computer would need to do would be to construct a data
    record like
 
        test_case = [ 'P_to_E=low', 
                      'P_to_S=very_low', 
                      'R_on_E=none',
                      'M_S=medium',
                      'S=low'  ]
 
    and call the decision tree classifier you just constructed by
 
        classification = dt.classify(root_node, test_case)
 
        print "Classification: ", classification
 
    The answer returned will be 'buy' and 'sell', along with the associated
    probabilities.  So if the probability of 'buy' is considerably greater
    than the probability of 'sell', that's what you should instruct your
    computer to do.
 
    The chances are that, on the average, this approach would beat the
    performance of any of your individual traders who worked for you
    previously since the buy/sell decisions made by the computer would be
    based on the collective wisdom of all your previous traders.
    DISCLAIMER: There is obviously a lot more to good investing than what
    is captured by the silly little example here. However, it does convey
    the sense in which the current module can be used.
 
 
SYMBOLIC FEATURES VERSUS NUMERIC FEATURES:  

    A feature is symbolic when its values are compared using string
    comparison operators.  By the same token, a feature is numeric when its
    values are compared using numeric comparison operators.  Having said
    that, features that take only a small number of numeric values in the
    training data can be treated symbolically provided you are careful
    about handling their values in the test data.  At the least, you have
    to set the test data value for such a feature to its closest value in
    the training data.  For those numeric features that the module is
    allowed to treat symbolically, this snapping of the values of the
    features in the test data to the small set of values in the training
    data is carried out automatically by the module.  That is, after a user
    has told the module which numeric features to treat symbolically, the
    user need not worry about how the feature values appear in the test
    data.
 
    The constructor parameter symbolic_to_numeric_cardinality_threshold
    let's you tell the module when to consider an otherwise numeric feature
    symbolically. Suppose you set this parameter to 10, that means that all
    numeric looking features that take 10 or fewer different values in the
    training datafile will be considered to be symbolic features.
    
    See the tutorial at
 
    https://engineering.purdue.edu/kak/Tutorials/DecisionTreeClassifiers.pdf
 
    for further information on the implementation issues related to the
    symbolic and numeric features.
 
 
FEATURES WITH NOT SO "NICE" STATISTICAL PROPERTIES:
 
    For the purpose of estimating the probabilities, it is necessary to
    sample the range of values taken on by a numerical feature. For
    features with "nice" statistical properties, this sampling interval is
    set to the median of the differences between the successive feature
    values in the training data.  (Obviously, as you would expect, you
    first sort all the values for a feature before computing the successive
    differences.)  This logic will not work for the sort of a feature
    described below.
 
    Consider a feature whose values are heavy-tailed, and, at the same
    time, the values span a million to one range.  What I mean by
    heavy-tailed is that rare values can occur with significant
    probabilities.  It could happen that most of the values for such a
    feature are clustered at one of the two ends of the range. At the same
    time, there may exist a significant number of values near the end of
    the range that is less populated.  (Typically, features related to
    human economic activities --- such as wealth, incomes, etc. --- are of
    this type.)  With the logic described in the previous paragraph, you
    could end up with a sampling interval that is much too small, which
    could result in millions of sampling points for the feature if you are
    not careful.
 
    Beginning with Version 2.2.4, you have two options in dealing with such
    features.  You can choose to go with the default behavior of the
    module, which is to sample the value range for such a feature over a
    maximum of 500 points.  Or, you can supply an additional option to the
    constructor that sets a user-defined value for the number of points to
    use.  The name of the option is "number_of_histogram_bins".  The
    following script
 
          construct_dt_for_heavytailed.py
 
    in the Examples directory shows an example of how to call the
    constructor of the module with the "number_of_histogram_bins" option.
 
 
TESTING THE QUALITY OF YOUR TRAINING DATA:
 
    Starting with version 2.2, the module includes a new class named
    EvalTrainingData, derived from the main class DecisionTree, that runs a
    10-fold cross-validation test on your training data to test its ability
    to discriminate between the classes mentioned in the training file.
 
    The 10-fold cross-validation test divides all of the training data into
    ten parts, with nine parts used for training a decision tree and one
    part used for testing its ability to classify correctly. This selection
    of nine parts for training and one part for testing is carried out in
    all of the ten different possible ways.  
 
    The following code fragment illustrates how you invoke the testing
    function of the EvalTrainingData class:
 
        training_datafile = "training3.csv"
        eval_data = DecisionTree.EvalTrainingData(
                                training_datafile = training_datafile,
                                csv_class_column_index = 1,
                                csv_columns_for_features = [2,3],
                                entropy_threshold = 0.01,
                                max_depth_desired = 3,
                                symbolic_to_numeric_cardinality_threshold = 10,
                    )
 
        eval_data.get_training_data()
        eval_data.evaluate_training_data()
 
    The last statement above prints out a Confusion Matrix and the value of
    Training Data Quality Index on a scale of 100, with 100 designating
    perfect training data.  The Confusion Matrix shows how the different
    classes were mis-identified in the 10-fold cross-validation test.
 
    This testing functionality can also be used to find the best values to
    use for the constructor parameters entropy_threshold,
    max_depth_desired, and symbolic_to_numeric_cardinality_threshold.
 
    The following two scripts in the Examples directory illustrate the use
    of the EvalTrainingData class for testing the quality of your data:
 
        evaluate_training_data1.py
 
        evaluate_training_data2.py
 
 
HOW TO MAKE THE BEST CHOICES FOR THE CONSTRUCTOR PARAMETERS:
 
    Assuming your training data is good, the quality of the results you get
    from a decision tree would depend on the choices you make for the
    constructor parameters entropy_threshold, max_depth_desired, and
    symbolic_to_numeric_cardinality_threshold.  You can optimize your
    choices for these parameters by running the 10-fold cross-validation
    test that is made available in Versions 2.2 and higher through the new
    class EvalTrainingData that is included in the module file.  A
    description of how to run this test is in the section titled "TESTING
    THE QUALITY OF YOUR TRAINING DATA" of this document.
 
 
DECISION TREE INTROSPECTION:
 
    Starting with Version 2.3, you can ask the DTIntrospection class of the
    module to explain the classification decisions made at the different
    nodes of the decision tree.
 
    Perhaps the most important bit of information you are likely to seek
    through DT introspection is the list of the training samples that fall
    directly in the portion of the feature space that is assigned to a
    node.
 
    However, note that, when training samples are non-uniformly distributed
    in the underlying feature space, it is possible for a node to exist
    even when there are no training samples in the portion of the feature
    space assigned to the node.  That is because the decision tree is
    constructed from the probability densities estimated from the training
    data.  When the training samples are non-uniformly distributed, it is
    entirely possible for the estimated probability densities to be
    non-zero in a small region around a point even when there are no
    training samples specifically in that region.  (After you have created
    a statistical model for, say, the height distribution of people in a
    community, the model may return a non-zero probability for the height
    values in a small interval even if the community does not include a
    single individual whose height falls in that interval.)
 
    That a decision-tree node can exist even where there are no training samples in
    the portion of the feature space that belongs to that node is an important
    indication of the generalization ability of a decision-tree based classifier.
 
    In light of the explanation provided above, before the DTIntrospection
    class supplies any answers at all, it asks you to accept the fact that
    features can take on non-zero probabilities at a point in the feature
    space even though there are zero training samples at that point (or in
    a small region around that point).  If you do not accept this
    rudimentary fact, the introspection class will not yield any answers
    (since you are not going to believe the answers anyway).
 
    The point made above implies that the path leading to a node in the
    decision tree may test a feature for a certain value or threshold
    despite the fact that the portion of the feature space assigned to that
    node is devoid of any training data.
 
    See the following three scripts in the Examples directory for how to
    carry out DT introspection:
 
        introspection_in_a_loop_interactive.py
 
        introspection_show_training_samples_at_all_nodes_direct_influence.py
 
        introspection_show_training_samples_to_nodes_influence_propagation.py
 
    The first script places you in an interactive session in which you will
    first be asked for the node number you are interested in.
    Subsequently, you will be asked for whether or not you are interested
    in specific questions that the introspection can provide answers
    for. The second script descends down the decision tree and shows for
    each node the training samples that fall directly in the portion of the
    feature space assigned to that node.  The third script shows for each
    training sample how it affects the decision-tree nodes either directly
    or indirectly through the generalization achieved by the probabilistic
    modeling of the data.
 
    The output of the script introspection_show_training_samples_at_all_
    nodes_direct_influence.py looks like:
 
        Node 0: the samples are: None
        Node 1: the samples are: ['sample_46', 'sample_58']
        Node 2: the samples are: ['sample_1', 'sample_4', 'sample_7', .....]
        Node 3: the samples are: []
        Node 4: the samples are: []
        ...
        ...            
    
    The nodes for which no samples are listed come into existence through
    the generalization achieved by the probabilistic modeling of the data.
 
    The output produced by the script introspection_show_training_samples_
    to_nodes_influence_propagation.py looks like
 
        sample_1:                                                                 
           nodes affected directly: [2, 5, 19, 23]                                
           nodes affected through probabilistic generalization:                   
                2=> [3, 4, 25]                                                    
                    25=> [26]                                                     
                5=> [6]                                                           
                    6=> [7, 13]                                                   
                        7=> [8, 11]                                               
                            8=> [9, 10]                                           
                            11=> [12]                                             
                        13=> [14, 18]                                             
                            14=> [15, 16]                                         
                                16=> [17]                                         
                19=> [20]                                                         
                    20=> [21, 22]                                                 
                23=> [24]                                                         
                                 
        sample_4:                                                                 
           nodes affected directly: [2, 5, 6, 7, 11]                              
           nodes affected through probabilistic generalization:                   
                2=> [3, 4, 25]                                                    
                    25=> [26]                                                     
                5=> [19]                                                          
                    19=> [20, 23]                                                 
                        20=> [21, 22]                                             
                        23=> [24]                                                 
                6=> [13]                                                          
                    13=> [14, 18]                                                 
                        14=> [15, 16]                                             
                            16=> [17]                                             
                7=> [8]                                                           
                    8=> [9, 10]                                                   
                11=> [12]                                                         
                                                                                  
        ...                                                                       
        ...  
        ...
    
    For each training sample, the display shown above first presents the
    list of nodes that are directly affected by the sample.  A node is
    affected directly by a sample if the latter falls in the portion of the
    feature space that belongs to the former.  Subsequently, for each
    training sample, the display shows a subtree of the nodes that are
    affected indirectly by the sample through the generalization achieved
    by the probabilistic modeling of the data.  In general, a node is
    affected indirectly by a sample if it is a descendant of another node
    that is affected directly.
 
    Also see the section titled "The Introspection API" regarding how to
    invoke the introspection capabilities of the module in your own code.
 
 
METHODS:
 
    The module provides the following methods for constructing a decision
    tree from training data in a disk file, and for data classification with
    the decision tree.
 
 
    Constructing a decision tree:
    
            dt = DecisionTree( training_datafile = training_datafile,
                               csv_class_column_index = 2,
                               csv_columns_for_features = [3,4,5,6,7,8],
                               entropy_threshold = 0.01,
                               max_depth_desired = 8,
                               symbolic_to_numeric_cardinality_threshold = 10,
                             )
    
        This yields a new instance of the DecisionTree class.  For this call to
        make sense, the training data in the training datafile must conform to
        a certain format.  For example, the first row must list the features.
        It must begin with the empty string `""' as shown by the CSV files in
        the Examples subdirectory.  The first column for all subsequent rows
        must carry a unique integer identifier for each data record.  When your
        features are purely symbolic, you are also allowed to use the `.dat'
        files that were used in the previous versions of this module.
    
        The constructor option csv_class_column_index supplies to the module
        zero-based index of the column that contains the class label for the
        training data records. In the example shown above, the class labels are
        in the third column.  The option csv_columns_for_features tells the
        module which of the features are supposed to be used for decision tree
        construction.  The constructor option max_depth_desired sets the
        maximum depth of the decision tree. The parameter entropy_threshold
        sets the granularity with which the entropies are sampled.  The
        parameter symbolic_to_numeric_cardinality_threshold allows the module
        to treat an otherwise numeric feature symbolically if it only takes a
        small number of different values in the training data file.  For the
        constructor call shown above, if a feature takes on only 10 or fewer
        different values in the training data file, it will be treated like a
        symbolic feature.
    
 
    The constructor parameters:
 
        training_datafile:
    
            This parameter supplies the name of the file that contains the
            training data.  This must be a CSV file if your training data
            includes both numeric and symbolic features.  If your data is
            purely symbolic, you can use the old-style `.dat' file.
    
        csv_class_column_index:
    
            When using a CSV file for your training data, this parameter
            supplies the zero-based column index for the column that contains
            the class label for each data record in the training file.
    
        csv_columns_for_features:
    
            When using a CSV file for your training data, this parameter
            supplies a list of columns corresponding to the features you wish
            to use for decision tree construction.  Each column is specified by
            its zero-based index.
    
        entropy_threshold:
    
            This parameter sets the granularity with which the entropies are
            sampled by the module.  For example, a feature test at a node in
            the decision tree is acceptable if the entropy gain achieved by the
            test exceeds this threshold.  The larger the value you choose for
            this parameter, the smaller the tree.  Its default value is 0.001.
    
        max_depth_desired:
    
            This parameter sets the maximum depth of the decision tree.  For
            obvious reasons, the smaller the value you choose for this
            parameter, the smaller the tree.
    
        symbolic_to_numeric_cardinality_threshold:
    
            This parameter allows the module to treat an otherwise numeric
            feature symbolically if the number of different values the feature
            takes in the training data file does not exceed the value of this
            parameter.
    
        number_of_histogram_bins:
    
            This parameter gives the user the option to set the number of
            points at which the value range for a feature should be sampled for
            estimating the probabilities.  This parameter is effective only for
            those features that occupy a large value range and whose
            probability distributions are heavy tailed.
    
        You can choose the best values to use for the constructor parameters by
        running a 10-fold cross-validation test on your training data through
        the embedded class EvalTrainingData that comes with Versions 2.2 and
        higher of this module.  See the section "TESTING THE QUALITY OF YOUR
        TRAINING DATA" of this document page.
    
 
    Reading in the training data:
 
        After you have constructed a new instance of the DecisionTree class,
        you must now read in the training data that is contained in the file
        named above.  This you do by:
    
            dt.get_training_data()
    
        IMPORTANT: The training data file must be in a format that makes sense
        to the decision tree constructor.  If you use numeric features, you
        must use a CSV file for supplying the training data.  The first row of
        such a file must name the features and it must begin with the empty
        string `""' as shown in the `stage3cancer.csv' file in the Examples
        subdirectory.  The first column for all subsequent rows must carry a
        unique integer identifier for each training record.
    
 
    Initializing the probability cache:
 
        After a call to the constructor and the get_training_data() method, you
        must call the following methods for initializing the probabilities:
    
            dt.calculate_first_order_probabilities()
            dt.calculate_class_priors()
    
 
    Displaying the training data:
 
        If you wish to see the training data that was just digested by the
        module, call
    
            dt.show_training_data() 
    
 
    Constructing a decision-tree classifier:
 
        After the training data is ingested, it is time to construct a decision
        tree classifier.  This you do by
    
            root_node = dt.construct_decision_tree_classifier()
    
        This call returns an instance of type DTNode.  The DTNode class is
        defined within the main package file, at its end.  So, don't forget,
        that root_node in the above example call will be instantiated to an
        instance of type DTNode.
    
 
    Displaying the decision tree:
 
        You display a decision tree by calling
    
            root_node.display_decision_tree("   ")
    
        This displays the decision tree in your terminal window by using a
        recursively determined offset for each node as the display routine
        descends down the tree.
    
        I have intentionally left the syntax fragment root_node in the above
        call to remind the reader that display_decision_tree() is NOT called on
        the instance of the DecisionTree we constructed earlier, but on the
        Node instance returned by the call to
        construct_decision_tree_classifier().
    
 
    Classifying new data:
 
        You classify new data by first constructing a new data record:
    
            test_sample  = ['g2 = 4.2',
                            'grade = 2.3',
                            'gleason = 4',
                            'eet = 1.7',
                            'age = 55.0',
                            'ploidy = diploid']
    
        and calling the classify() method as follows:
     
            classification = dt.classify(root_node, test_sample)
    
        where, again, root_node is an instance of type Node that was returned
        by calling construct_decision_tree_classifier().  The variable
        classification is a dictionary whose keys are the class labels and
        whose values the associated probabilities.  You can print it out by
    
            print "Classification: ", classification
    
 
    Displaying the number of nodes created:
 
        You can print out the number of nodes in a decision tree by calling
    
            root_node.how_many_nodes()
    
 
    Using the decision tree interactively:
 
        Starting with Version 1.6 of the module, you can use the DecisionTree
        classifier in an interactive mode.  In this mode, after you have
        constructed the decision tree, the user is prompted for answers to the
        questions regarding the feature tests at the nodes of the tree.
        Depending on the answer supplied by the user at a node, the classifier
        takes a path corresponding to the answer to descend down the tree to
        the next node, and so on.  The following method makes this mode
        possible.  Obviously, you can call this method only after you have
        constructed the decision tree.
    
            dt.classify_by_asking_questions(root_node)
    
 
    Generating synthetic training data:
 
        To generate synthetic training data, you first construct an instance of
        the class TrainingDataGenerator that is incorporated in the
        DecisionTree module.  A call to the constructor of this class will look
        like:
    
            parameter_file = "param_numeric.txt"
            output_csv_file = "training.csv";
            training_data_gen = TrainingDataGeneratorNumeric(
                                  output_csv_file   = output_csv_file,
                                  parameter_file    = parameter_file,
                                  number_of_samples_per_class = some_number,
                                )
            training_data_gen.read_parameter_file_numeric()
            training_data_gen.gen_numeric_training_data_and_write_to_csv()
    
        The training data that is generated is according to the specifications
        described in the parameter file.  The structure of this file must be as
        shown in the file `param_numeric.txt' for the numeric training data and
        as shown in `param_symbolic.txt' for the case of symbolic training
        data.  Both these example parameter files are in the 'Examples'
        subdirectory.  The parameter file names the classes, the features for
        the classes, and the possible values for the features.
    
        If you want to generate purely symbolic training data, here is the
        constructor call to make:
    
            parameter_file = "param_symbolic.txt"
            output_data_file = "training.dat";
            training_data_gen = TrainingDataGeneratorSymbolic(
                                  output_datafile   = output_data_file,
                                  parameter_file    = parameter_file,
                                  write_to_file     = 1,
                                  number_of_training_samples = some_number,
                                )
            training_data_gen.read_parameter_file_symbolic()
            training_data_gen.gen_symbolic_training_data()
            training_data_gen.write_training_data_to_file()
    
 
    Generating synthetic test data:
 
        To generate synthetic test data, you first construct an instance of the
        class TestDataGeneratorSymbolic that is incorporated in the
        DecisionTree module.  A call to the constructor of this class will look
        like:
    
            test_data_gen = TestDataGeneratorSymbolic(
                              output_test_datafile     = an_output_data_file,
                              output_class_labels_file = a_file_for_class_labels,
                              parameter_file           = a_parameter_file,
                              write_to_file            = 1,
                              number_of_test_samples = some_number,
                            )
    
        The main difference between the training data and the test data is that
        the class labels are NOT mentioned in the latter.  Instead, the class
        labels are placed in a separate file whose name is supplied through the
        constructor option `output_class_labels_file' shown above.  The test
        data that is generated is according to the specifications described in
        the parameter file.  In general, this parameter file would be the same
        that you used for generating the training data.
    
    
THE INTROSPECTION API:
 
    To construct an instance of DTIntrospection, you call
 
        introspector = DecisionTree.DTIntrospection(dt)
 
    where you supply the instance of the DecisionTree class you used for
    constructing the decision tree through the parameter dt.  After you
    have constructed an instance of the introspection class, you must
    initialize it by
 
        introspector.initialize()
 
    on the introspector instance. Subsequently, you can invoke either of
    the following methods:
 
        introspector.explain_classification_at_one_node(node)
 
        introspector.explain_classifications_at_multiple_nodes_interactively()
 
    depending on whether you want introspection at a single specified node
    or inside an infinite loop for an arbitrary number of nodes.
 
    If you want to output a tabular display that shows for each node in the
    decision tree all the training samples that fall in the portion of the
    feature space that belongs to that node, call
 
        introspector.display_training_samples_at_all_nodes_direct_influence_only()
 
    If you want to output a tabular display that shows for each training
    sample a list of all the nodes that are affected directly AND
    indirectly by that sample, call
 
        introspector.display_training_training_samples_to_nodes_influence_propagation()
 
    A training sample affects a node directly if the sample falls in the
    portion of the features space assigned to that node. On the other hand,
    a training sample is considered to affect a node indirectly if the node
    is a decendent of a node that is affected directly by the sample.
 
 
BULK CLASSIFICATION OF DATA RECORDS
 
    For large test datasets, you would obviously want to process an entire
    file of test data at a time. The following scripts in the Examples
    directory illustrate how you can do that:
 
      classify_test_data_in_a_file_numeric.py 
 
      classify_test_data_in_a_file_symbolic.py
 
    These scripts require three command-line arguments, the first argument
    names the training datafile, the second the test datafile, and the
    third the file in which the classification results are to be deposited.
    The first script above is for the case of numeric/symbolic features and
    the second for the purely symbolic features.  An important point to
    remember when using these scripts for bulk classification is that the
    test file must have a column for class labels.  In real-life
    situations, obviously, the entries in that column in the test file will
    be just the empty string "".
 
 
HOW THE CLASSIFICATION RESULTS ARE DISPLAYED
 
    It depends on whether you apply the classifier at once to all the data
    records in a file, or whether you feed one data record at a time into
    the classifier.
 
    In general, the classifier returns soft classification for a test data
    record.  What that means is that, in general, the classifier will list
    all the classes to which a given data record could belong and the
    probability of each such class label for the data record. Run the
    examples scripts in the Examples directory to see how the output of
    classification can be displayed.
    
    With regard to the soft classifications returned by this classifier, if
    the probability distributions for the different classes overlap in the
    underlying feature space, you would want the classifier to return all
    of the applicable class labels for a test data record along with the
    corresponding class probabilities.  (However, keep in mind the fact
    that the decision tree classifier may associate significant
    probabilities with multiple class labels for a given test data record
    if the training file contains an inadequate number of training samples
    for one or more classes.)  The good thing is that the classifier would
    not lie to you (unlike, say, a hard classification rule that would
    return a single class label corresponding to the partitioning of the
    underlying feature space).  The decision tree classifier will give you
    the best classification that can be made given the training data you
    feed into it.
 
 
USING BAGGING:
 
    Starting with Version 3.0, you can use the class
    DecisionTreeWithBagging that comes with the module to incorporate
    bagging in your decision tree based classification.  Bagging means
    constructing multiple decision trees for different (possibly
    overlapping) segments of the data extracted from your training dataset
    and then aggregating the decisions made by the individual decision
    trees for the final classification.  The aggregation of the
    classification decisions can average out the noise and bias that may
    otherwise affect the classification decision obtained from just one
    tree.
 
    Calling the bagging constructor:
 
        A typical call to the constructor for the DecisionTreeWithBagging
    
            import DecisionTreeWithBagging
    
            dtbag = DecisionTreeWithBagging.DecisionTreeWithBagging( 
                                    training_datafile = training_datafile,
                                    csv_class_column_index = 2,
                                    csv_columns_for_features = [3,4,5,6,7,8],
                                    entropy_threshold = 0.01,
                                    max_depth_desired = 8,
                                    symbolic_to_numeric_cardinality_threshold = 10,
                                    how_many_bags = 4,
                                    bag_overlap_fraction = 0.20,
                    )
    
        Note the following two new constructor parameters:
    
            how_many_bags
    
            bag_overlap_fraction
    
        where, as the name implies, the parameter how_many_bags controls how
        many bags (and, therefore, how many decision trees) will be constructed
        from your training dataset; and where the parameter
        bag_overlap_fraction controls the degree of overlap between the bags.
        To understand what exactly is achieved by the parameter
        bag_overlap_fraction to 0.2, let's say that the non-overlapping
        partitioning of the training data between the bags results in 100
        training samples per bag. With bag_overlap_fraction set to 0.2,
        additional 20 samples drawn randomly from the other bags will be added
        to the data in each bag.
    
        Here are the methods defined for the DecisionTreeWithBagging class;
    
    get_training_data_for_bagging():
 
            This method reads your training datafile, randomizes its rows, and
            partitions into the specified number of bags.  Subsequently, if the
            constructor parameter is found to be non-zero, it adds to each bag
            additional samples drawn at random from the other bags.  These
            number of these additional samples is controlled by the constructor
            parameter bag_overlap_fraction.  If this parameter is set to, say,
            0.2, the size of each bag will grow by 20% with the samples drawn
            from the other bags.
    
    show_training_data_in_bags()
 
            Shows for each bag the names of the training data samples in that
            bag.
 
    calculate_first_order_probabilities()
 
            Calls on the appropriate methods of the main DecisionTree class to
            estimate the first-order probabilities from the samples in each
            bag.
 
    calculate_class_priors()
 
            Calls on the appropriate method of the main DecisionTree class to
            estimate the class priors for the data classes found in each
            bag.
 
    construct_decision_trees_for_bags()
 
            Calls on the appropriate method of the main DecisionTree class
            to construct a decision tree from the training data in each
            bag.
 
    display_decision_trees_for_bags()
 
            Display separately the decision tree for each bag.
 
    classify_with_bagging( test_sample )
 
            Calls on the appropriate methods of the main DecisionTree class
            to classify the argument test sample.
 
    display_classification_results_for_each_bag()
 
            Displays separately the classification decision made by each the
            decision tree constructed for each bag.
 
    get_majority_vote_classification()
 
        Using majority voting, this method aggregates the classification
        decisions made by the individual decision trees into a single
        decision.
 
        See the example scripts in the directory BaggingExamples for how to
        call these methods for classifying individual samples and for bulk
        classification when you place all your test samples in a single file.
 
 
THE Examples DIRECTORY:
 
    See the 'Examples' directory in the distribution for how to construct a
    decision tree, and how to then classify new data using the decision
    tree.  To become more familiar with the module, run the scripts
 
        construct_dt_and_classify_one_sample_case1.py
        construct_dt_and_classify_one_sample_case2.py
        construct_dt_and_classify_one_sample_case3.py
        construct_dt_and_classify_one_sample_case4.py
 
    The first script is for the purely symbolic case, the second for the
    case that involves both numeric and symbolic features, the third for
    the case of purely numeric features, and the last for the case when the
    training data is synthetically generated by the script
    generate_training_data_numeric.py
 
    Next, run the following script as it is for bulk classification of data
    records placed in a CSV file:
 
      classify_test_data_in_a_file_numeric.py  training4.csv  test4.csv  out4.csv
 
    The script first constructs a decision tree using the training data in
    the first-argument file, `training4.csv'.  Subsequently, the script
    calculates the class labels for each of the test records in the file
    `test4.csv'.  The class labels are written out the file `out4.csv'.  An
    important thing to note here that your test file --- in this case
    `test4.csv' --- must have a column for the class labels.  Obviously, in
    real-life situations, there will be no class labels in this column.
    When that is the case, you can place the empty string "" for each data
    record in this column.  A demonstration of that is give by the
    following variation of the above call:
 
      classify_test_data_in_a_file_numeric.py  training4.csv  test4_no_class_labels.csv  out4.csv 
 
    If you want to use the old-style `.dat' files for the purely symbolic case,
    you can do bulk classifications with those files also, as demonstrated by 
    the following examples:
 
      classify_test_data_in_a_file_symbolic.py  training4.dat  test4.dat  out4.dat
 
      classify_test_data_in_a_file_symbolic.py  training4.dat  test4_no_class_labels.dat  out4.dat
 
    The point of the second example is to show the format of the test data
    file must be identical to that of the training data file, in the sense
    that it must have a column for the class labels even when those labels
    are just empty strings "".
 
    The following script in the 'Examples' directory 
 
        classify_by_asking_questions.py
 
    shows how you can use a decision-tree classifier interactively.  In
    this mode, you first construct the decision tree from the training data
    and then the user is prompted for answers to the feature tests at the
    nodes of the tree.
 
    If your training data has a feature whose values span a large range
    and, at the same time, are characterized by a heavy-tail distribution,
    you should look at the script 
 
        construct_dt_for_heavytailed.py
 
    to see how to use the option number_of_histogram_bins in the call to
    the constructor.  This option was introduced in Version 2.2.4 for
    dealing with such features.  If you do not set this option, the module
    will use the default value of 500 for the number of points at which to
    sample the value range for such a feature.
 
    The 'Examples' directory also contains the following scripts:
 
        generate_training_data_numeric.py
        generate_training_data_symbolic.py
        generate_test_data_symbolic.py
 
    that show how you can use the module to generate synthetic training and
    test data.  Synthetic training and test data are generated according to
    the specifications laid out in a parameter file.  There are constraints
    on how the information is laid out in the parameter file.  See the
    files `param_numeric.txt' and `param_symbolic.txt' in the 'Examples'
    directory for how to structure these files.
 
    The Examples directory of Versions 2.2 and higher of the DecisionTree
    module also contains the following two scripts:
 
       evaluate_training_data1.py
       evaluate_training_data2.py
 
    that illustrate how the Python class EvalTrainingData can be used to
    evaluate the quality of your training data (as long as it resides in a
    `.csv' file.)  This new class is a subclass of the DecisionTree class
    in the module file.  See the README in the Examples directory for
    further information regarding these two scripts.
 
    The Examples directory of Versions 2.3.2 and higher of the module
    contains the following three scripts:
 
        introspection_in_a_loop_interactive.py
 
        introspection_show_training_samples_at_all_nodes_direct_influence.py
 
        introspection_show_training_samples_to_nodes_influence_propagation.py
 
    The first script illustrates how to use the DTIntrospection class of
    the module interactively for generating explanations for the
    classification decisions made at the nodes of the decision tree.  In
    the interactive session you are first asked for the node number you are
    interested in.  Subsequently, you are asked for whether or not you are
    interested in specific questions that the introspector can provide
    answers for. The second script generates a tabular display that shows
    for each node of the decision tree a list of the training samples that
    fall directly in the portion of the feature space assigned that node.
    (As mentioned elsewhere in this documentation, when this list is empty
    for a node, that means the node is a result of the generalization
    achieved by probabilistic modeling of the data.  Note that this module
    constructs a decision tree NOT by partitioning the set of training
    samples, BUT by partitioning the domains of the probability density
    functions.)  The third script listed above also generates a tabular
    display, but one that shows how the influence of each training sample
    propagates in the tree.  This display first shows the list of nodes
    that are affected directly by the data in a training sample. This list
    is followed by an indented display of the nodes that are affected
    indirectly by the training sample.  A training sample affects a node
    indirectly if the node is a descendant of one of the nodes affected
    directly.
 
 
THE BaggingExamples DIRECTORY:
 
    The BaggingExamples subdirectory in the main installation directory
    contains the following scripts:
 
        bagging_for_classifying_one_test_sample.py
 
        bagging_for_bulk_classification.py
 
    As the names of the scripts imply, the first shows how to call the
    different methods of the DecisionTreeWithBagging class for classifying
    a single test sample.  When you are classifying a single test sample,
    you can see also see the what each bag is doing vis-a-vis the test
    sample.  You can, for example, display the training data used in each
    bag, the decision tree constructed for each bag, etc.
 
    The second script is for the case when you place all of the test
    samples in a single file.  The demonstration script displays for each
    test sample a single aggregate classification decision that is obtained
    through majority voting by all the decision trees.
 
 
INSTALLATION:
 
    The DecisionTree class was packaged using setuptools.  For
    installation, execute the following command-line in the source
    directory (this is the directory that contains the setup.py file after
    you have downloaded and uncompressed the package):
 
            sudo python setup.py install
 
    and/or
 
            sudo python3 setup.py install
 
    On Linux distributions, this will install the module file at a location
    that looks like
 
             /usr/local/lib/python2.7/dist-packages/
 
    and for Python3 at a location like
 
             /usr/local/lib/python3.4/dist-packages/
 
    If you do not have root access, you have the option of working directly
    off the directory in which you downloaded the software by simply
    placing the following statements at the top of your scripts that use
    the DecisionTree class:
 
            import sys
            sys.path.append( "pathname_to_DecisionTree_directory" )
 
    To uninstall the module, simply delete the source directory, locate
    where the DecisionTree module was installed with "locate DecisionTree"
    and delete those files.  As mentioned above, the full pathname to the
    installed version is likely to look like
    /usr/local/lib/python2.7/dist-packages/DecisionTree*
 
    If you want to carry out a non-standard install of the DecisionTree
    module, look up the on-line information on Disutils by pointing your
    browser to
 
              http://docs.python.org/dist/dist.html
 
 
BUGS:
 
    Please notify the author if you encounter any bugs.  When sending
    email, please place the string 'DecisionTree' in the subject line.
 
 
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS:
 
    The importance of the 'sentiment' feature in the "What Practical Problem
    is Solved by this Module" section was mentioned to the author by John
    Gorup.  Thanks John.
 
    Thanks go to Wenshuai Hou for discovering and reporting the bug that
    resulted in Version 2.2.3.  I should also thank Wenshuai for sending me
    a training data file with heavy-tailed values for one of the
    features. This datafile became the reason for the modifications to the
    code that are incorporated in Version 2.2.4.
 
    I owe many thanks to Eugene Kolotinsky for the bug discovery whose fix
    was the primary reason for Version 2.2.6.  This bug related to the
    erroneous calculation of the probability of a feature acquiring a
    certain value if the training data contained zeros for the feature
    values.
 
 
AUTHOR:
 
    Avinash Kak, kak@purdue.edu
 
    If you send email, please place the string "DecisionTree" in your
    subject line to get past my spam filter.
 
COPYRIGHT:
 
    Python Software Foundation License
 
    Copyright 2015 Avinash Kak
 
@endofdocs

 
Imported Modules
       
functools
itertools
math
operator
re
sys

 
Classes
       
__builtin__.object
DTIntrospection
DecisionTree
EvalTrainingData
TestDataGeneratorSymbolic
TrainingDataGeneratorNumeric
TrainingDataGeneratorSymbolic

 
class DTIntrospection(__builtin__.object)
    Instances constructed from this class can provide explanations for the
classification decisions at the nodes of a decision tree.  
 
When used in the interactive mode, the DT introspection made possible by this
class provides answers to the following three questions: (1) List of the training
samples that fall in the portion of the feature space that corresponds to the
node; (2) The probabilities associated with the last feature test that led to the
node; and (3) The class probabilities predicated on just the last feature test.
 
CAVEAT: It is possible for a node to exist even when there are no training
samples in the portion of the feature space that corresponds to the node.  That
is because a decision tree is based on the probability densities estimated from
the training data. When training data is non-uniformly distributed, it is
possible for the probability associated with a point in the feature space to be
non-zero even when there are no training samples at or in the vicinity of that
point.
 
For a node to exist even where there are no training samples in the portion of
the feature space that belongs to the node is an indication of the generalization
ability of decision-tree based classification.
 
When used in a non-interactive mode, an instance of this class can be used to
create a tabular display that shows what training samples belong directly to the
portion of the feature space that corresponds to each node of the decision tree.
An instance of this class can also construct a tabular display that shows how the
influence of each training sample propagates in the decision tree.  For each
training sample, this display first shows the list of nodes that came into
existence through feature test(s) that used the data provided by that sample.
This list for each training sample is followed by a subtree of the nodes that owe
their existence indirectly to the training sample. A training sample influences a
node indirectly if the node is a descendant of another node that is affected
directly by the training sample.
 
  Methods defined here:
__init__(self, dt)
display_training_samples_at_all_nodes_direct_influence_only(self)
display_training_samples_to_nodes_influence_propagation(self)
explain_classification_at_one_node(self, node_id)
explain_classifications_at_multiple_nodes_interactively(self)
extract_feature_op_val(self, feature_value_combo)
get_samples_for_feature_value_combo(self, feature_value_combo)
initialize(self)
recursive_descent(self, node)
recursive_descent_for_sample_to_node_influence(self, node_serial_num, nodes_already_accounted_for, offset)
recursive_descent_for_showing_samples_at_a_node(self, node)

Data descriptors defined here:
__dict__
dictionary for instance variables (if defined)
__weakref__
list of weak references to the object (if defined)

 
class DecisionTree(__builtin__.object)
     Methods defined here:
__init__(self, *args, **kwargs)
best_feature_calculator(self, features_and_values_or_thresholds_on_branch, existing_node_entropy)
This is the heart of the decision tree constructor.  Its main job is to figure
out the best feature to use for partitioning the training data samples that
correspond to the current node.  The search for the best feature is carried
out differently for symbolic features and for numeric features.  For a
symbolic feature, the method estimates the entropy for each value of the
feature and then averages out these entropies as a measure of the
discriminatory power of that features.  For a numeric feature, on the other
hand, it estimates the entropy reduction that can be achieved if we were to
partition the set of training samples at each possible threshold for that
numeric feature.  For a numeric feature, all possible sampling points
relevant to the node in question are considered as candidates for thresholds.
calculate_class_priors(self)
calculate_first_order_probabilities(self)
class_entropy_for_a_given_sequence_of_features_and_values_or_thresholds(self, array_of_features_and_values_or_thresholds)
class_entropy_for_greater_than_threshold_for_feature(self, array_of_features_and_values_or_thresholds, feature, threshold)
class_entropy_for_less_than_threshold_for_feature(self, array_of_features_and_values_or_thresholds, feature, threshold)
class_entropy_on_priors(self)
classify(self, root_node, features_and_values)
Classifies one test sample at a time using the decision tree constructed from
your training file.  The data record for the test sample must be supplied as
shown in the scripts in the `Examples' subdirectory.  See the scripts
construct_dt_and_classify_one_sample_caseX.py in that subdirectory.
classify_by_asking_questions(self, root_node)
If you want classification to be carried out by engaging a human user in a
question-answer session, this is the method to use for that purpose.  See the
script classify_by_asking_questions.py in the Examples subdirectory for an
illustration of how to do that.
construct_decision_tree_classifier(self)
At the root node, we find the best feature that yields the greatest reduction
in class entropy from the entropy based on just class priors. The logic for
finding this feature is different for symbolic features and for numeric
features.  That logic is built into the best feature calculator.
determine_data_condition(self)
This method estimates the worst-case fan-out of the decision tree taking into
account the number of values (and therefore the number of branches emanating
from a node) for the symbolic features.
entropy_scanner_for_a_numeric_feature(self, feature)
find_bounded_intervals_for_numeric_features(self, arr)
Given a list of branch attributes for the numeric features of the form, say,
['g2<1','g2<2','g2<3','age>34','age>36','age>37'], this method returns the
smallest list that is relevant for the purpose of calculating the
probabilities.  To explain, the probability that the feature `g2' is less
than 1 AND, at the same time, less than 2, AND, at the same time, less than
3, is the same as the probability that the feature less than 1. Similarly,
the probability that 'age' is greater than 34 and also greater than 37 is the
same as `age' being greater than 37.
get_class_names(self)
get_training_data(self)
If your training data is purely symbolic, as in Version 1.7.1, you might find
it easier to create a `.dat' file.  For purely numeric data, or mixed
symbolic and numeric data, you MUST use a `.csv' file.  See examples of these
files in the `Examples' subdirectory.
get_training_data_from_csv(self)
get_training_data_from_dat(self)
Meant for purely symbolic data (as in all versions up to v. 1.7.1)
interactive_recursive_descent_for_classification(self, node, answer, scratchpad_for_numerics)
prior_probability_for_class(self, class_name)
probability_of_a_class_given_sequence_of_features_and_values_or_thresholds(self, class_name, array_of_features_and_values_or_thresholds)
probability_of_a_sequence_of_features_and_values_or_thresholds(self, array_of_features_and_values_or_thresholds)
This method requires that all truly numeric types only be expressed as '<' or '>'
constructs in the array of branch features and thresholds
probability_of_a_sequence_of_features_and_values_or_thresholds_given_class(self, array_of_features_and_values_or_thresholds, class_name)
This method requires that all truly numeric types only be expressed as '<' or '>'
constructs in the array of branch features and thresholds
probability_of_feature_less_than_threshold(self, feature_name, threshold)
probability_of_feature_less_than_threshold_given_class(self, feature_name, threshold, class_name)
probability_of_feature_value(self, feature_name, value)
probability_of_feature_value_given_class(self, feature_name, feature_value, class_name)
recursive_descent(self, node)
After the root node of the decision tree is constructed by the previous
methods, we invoke this method recursively to create the rest of the tree.
At each node, we find the feature that achieves the largest entropy reduction
with regard to the partitioning of the training data samples that correspond
to that node.
recursive_descent_for_classification(self, node, feature_and_values, answer)
show_training_data(self)

Data descriptors defined here:
__dict__
dictionary for instance variables (if defined)
__weakref__
list of weak references to the object (if defined)

Data and other attributes defined here:
DTNode = <class 'DecisionTree.DTNode'>
The nodes of the decision tree are instances of this class:

 
class EvalTrainingData(DecisionTree)
    
Method resolution order:
EvalTrainingData
DecisionTree
__builtin__.object

Methods defined here:
__init__(self, *args, **kwargs)
evaluate_training_data(self)

Methods inherited from DecisionTree:
best_feature_calculator(self, features_and_values_or_thresholds_on_branch, existing_node_entropy)
This is the heart of the decision tree constructor.  Its main job is to figure
out the best feature to use for partitioning the training data samples that
correspond to the current node.  The search for the best feature is carried
out differently for symbolic features and for numeric features.  For a
symbolic feature, the method estimates the entropy for each value of the
feature and then averages out these entropies as a measure of the
discriminatory power of that features.  For a numeric feature, on the other
hand, it estimates the entropy reduction that can be achieved if we were to
partition the set of training samples at each possible threshold for that
numeric feature.  For a numeric feature, all possible sampling points
relevant to the node in question are considered as candidates for thresholds.
calculate_class_priors(self)
calculate_first_order_probabilities(self)
class_entropy_for_a_given_sequence_of_features_and_values_or_thresholds(self, array_of_features_and_values_or_thresholds)
class_entropy_for_greater_than_threshold_for_feature(self, array_of_features_and_values_or_thresholds, feature, threshold)
class_entropy_for_less_than_threshold_for_feature(self, array_of_features_and_values_or_thresholds, feature, threshold)
class_entropy_on_priors(self)
classify(self, root_node, features_and_values)
Classifies one test sample at a time using the decision tree constructed from
your training file.  The data record for the test sample must be supplied as
shown in the scripts in the `Examples' subdirectory.  See the scripts
construct_dt_and_classify_one_sample_caseX.py in that subdirectory.
classify_by_asking_questions(self, root_node)
If you want classification to be carried out by engaging a human user in a
question-answer session, this is the method to use for that purpose.  See the
script classify_by_asking_questions.py in the Examples subdirectory for an
illustration of how to do that.
construct_decision_tree_classifier(self)
At the root node, we find the best feature that yields the greatest reduction
in class entropy from the entropy based on just class priors. The logic for
finding this feature is different for symbolic features and for numeric
features.  That logic is built into the best feature calculator.
determine_data_condition(self)
This method estimates the worst-case fan-out of the decision tree taking into
account the number of values (and therefore the number of branches emanating
from a node) for the symbolic features.
entropy_scanner_for_a_numeric_feature(self, feature)
find_bounded_intervals_for_numeric_features(self, arr)
Given a list of branch attributes for the numeric features of the form, say,
['g2<1','g2<2','g2<3','age>34','age>36','age>37'], this method returns the
smallest list that is relevant for the purpose of calculating the
probabilities.  To explain, the probability that the feature `g2' is less
than 1 AND, at the same time, less than 2, AND, at the same time, less than
3, is the same as the probability that the feature less than 1. Similarly,
the probability that 'age' is greater than 34 and also greater than 37 is the
same as `age' being greater than 37.
get_class_names(self)
get_training_data(self)
If your training data is purely symbolic, as in Version 1.7.1, you might find
it easier to create a `.dat' file.  For purely numeric data, or mixed
symbolic and numeric data, you MUST use a `.csv' file.  See examples of these
files in the `Examples' subdirectory.
get_training_data_from_csv(self)
get_training_data_from_dat(self)
Meant for purely symbolic data (as in all versions up to v. 1.7.1)
interactive_recursive_descent_for_classification(self, node, answer, scratchpad_for_numerics)
prior_probability_for_class(self, class_name)
probability_of_a_class_given_sequence_of_features_and_values_or_thresholds(self, class_name, array_of_features_and_values_or_thresholds)
probability_of_a_sequence_of_features_and_values_or_thresholds(self, array_of_features_and_values_or_thresholds)
This method requires that all truly numeric types only be expressed as '<' or '>'
constructs in the array of branch features and thresholds
probability_of_a_sequence_of_features_and_values_or_thresholds_given_class(self, array_of_features_and_values_or_thresholds, class_name)
This method requires that all truly numeric types only be expressed as '<' or '>'
constructs in the array of branch features and thresholds
probability_of_feature_less_than_threshold(self, feature_name, threshold)
probability_of_feature_less_than_threshold_given_class(self, feature_name, threshold, class_name)
probability_of_feature_value(self, feature_name, value)
probability_of_feature_value_given_class(self, feature_name, feature_value, class_name)
recursive_descent(self, node)
After the root node of the decision tree is constructed by the previous
methods, we invoke this method recursively to create the rest of the tree.
At each node, we find the feature that achieves the largest entropy reduction
with regard to the partitioning of the training data samples that correspond
to that node.
recursive_descent_for_classification(self, node, feature_and_values, answer)
show_training_data(self)

Data descriptors inherited from DecisionTree:
__dict__
dictionary for instance variables (if defined)
__weakref__
list of weak references to the object (if defined)

Data and other attributes inherited from DecisionTree:
DTNode = <class 'DecisionTree.DTNode'>
The nodes of the decision tree are instances of this class:

 
class TestDataGeneratorSymbolic(__builtin__.object)
    This convenience class does basically the same thing as the
TrainingDataGeneratorSymbolic except that it places the class labels for the
sample records in a separate file.  Let's say you have already created a DT
classifier and you would like to test its class discriminatory power.  You can
use the classifier to calculate the class labels for the data records by the
class shown here.  And then you can you can compare those class labels with those
placed originally by this class in a separate file.  See the script
generate_test_data_symbolic.py for how to use this class.
 
  Methods defined here:
__init__(self, *args, **kwargs)
find_longest_value(self)
gen_test_data(self)
This method generates the test data according to the specifications
laid out in the parameter file read by the previous method.
read_parameter_file(self)
This methods reads the parameter file for generating the test data.
write_test_data_to_file(self)

Data descriptors defined here:
__dict__
dictionary for instance variables (if defined)
__weakref__
list of weak references to the object (if defined)

 
class TrainingDataGeneratorNumeric(__builtin__.object)
    See the example script generate_training_data_numeric.py on how to use this class
for generating your numeric training data.  The training data is generator in
accordance with the specifications you place in a parameter file.
 
  Methods defined here:
__init__(self, *args, **kwargs)
gen_numeric_training_data_and_write_to_csv(self)
After the parameter file is parsed by the previous method, this method calls
on `numpy.random.multivariate_normal()' to generate the training data
samples. Your training data can be of any number of of dimensions, can have
any mean, and any covariance.
read_parameter_file_numeric(self)
The training data generated by an instance of the class
TrainingDataGeneratorNumeric is based on the specs you place in a parameter
that you supply to the class constructor through a constructor variable
called `parameter_file.  This method is for parsing the parameter file in
order to order to determine the names to be used for the different data
classes, their means, and their variances.

Data descriptors defined here:
__dict__
dictionary for instance variables (if defined)
__weakref__
list of weak references to the object (if defined)

 
class TrainingDataGeneratorSymbolic(__builtin__.object)
    See the sample script generate_training_data_symbolic.py for how to use this
class for generating symbolic training data.  The data is generated according to
the specifications you place in a parameter file.
 
  Methods defined here:
__init__(self, *args, **kwargs)
find_longest_feature_or_value(self)
gen_symbolic_training_data(self)
This method generates the training data according to the specifications
placed in the parameter file that is read by the previous method.
read_parameter_file_symbolic(self)
Read the parameter file for generating symbolic training data. See the script
generate_training_data_symbolic.py in the Examples directory for how to pass
the name of the parameter file to the constructor of the
TrainingDataGeneratorSymbolic class.
write_training_data_to_file(self)

Data descriptors defined here:
__dict__
dictionary for instance variables (if defined)
__weakref__
list of weak references to the object (if defined)

 
Functions
       
closest_sampling_point(value, arr)
convert(value)
deep_copy_array(array_in)
Meant only for an array of scalars (no nesting):
minimum(arr)
Returns simultaneously the minimum value and its positional index in an
array. [Could also have used min() and index() defined for Python's
sequence types.]
sample_index(sample_name)
When the training data is read from a CSV file, we assume that the first column
of each data record contains a unique integer identifier for the record in that
row. This training data is stored in a dictionary whose keys are the prefix
'sample_' followed by the identifying integers.  For the data in the old-style
`.dat' files, we assume that each record begins with the string `sample_xx' where
`xx' is a unique integer.  In both cases, the purpose of this function is to
return the identifying integer associated with a data record.

 
Data
        __author__ = 'Avinash Kak (kak@purdue.edu)'
__copyright__ = '(C) 2015 Avinash Kak. Python Software Foundation.'
__date__ = '2015-May-18'
__url__ = 'https://engineering.purdue.edu/kak/distDT/DecisionTree-3.0.html'
__version__ = '3.0'
 
Author
        Avinash Kak (kak@purdue.edu)