Teaching

Basic Mechanics II: Dynamics (ME274)

Professor, Undergraduate Course, Fall 2018, Purdue University

Particle motion, velocity and acceleration with cartesian, path and polar descriptions. Rigid body kinematics. Relative motion. Kinetics of particles. Newton's second law, work-energy, impulse-momentum. Kinetics of rigid bodies. Vibrations.

Introduction to the Mechanics of Serial and Parallel Robots

Taught with Prof. Mario Acevedo, Study Abroad Undergraduate Course, Spring Break 2018,
Purdue University and Universidad Panamericana

Kinematics of robots with different descriptions. Dynamics in natural coordinates. Project: implement in Python the equations of motion of a parallel manipulator and plan a trajectory. Intercultural learning outcomes: self-awareness and empathy.

Basic Mechanics II: Dynamics (ME274)

Professor, Undergraduate Course, Spring 2018, Purdue University

Particle motion, velocity and acceleration with cartesian, path and polar descriptions. Rigid body kinematics. Relative motion. Kinetics of particles. Newton's second law, work-energy, impulse-momentum. Kinetics of rigid bodies. Vibrations.

Basic Mechanics I: Statics (ME270)

Professor, Undergraduate Course, Fall 2017, Purdue University

Vector operations, forces and couples. Free body diagrams, equilibrium of a particle and of rigid bodies. Distributed forces. Centers of gravity and centroids. Friction. Trusses, frames, and machines. Internal reactions resulting from axial, shear, torsional, and bending loading. Stress and strain analyses and elementary failure criteria.

Basic Mechanics I: Statics (ME270)

Professor, Undergraduate Course, Spring 2017, Purdue University

Vector operations, forces and couples. Free body diagrams, equilibrium of a particle and of rigid bodies. Distributed forces. Centers of gravity and centroids. Friction. Trusses, frames, and machines. Internal reactions resulting from axial, shear, torsional, and bending loading. Stress and strain analyses and elementary failure criteria.

Check out our lecture on the potato equations (introduction to mechanics of materials)

Basic Mechanics I: Statics (ME270)

Professor, Undergraduate Course, Fall 2016, Purdue University

Vector operations, forces and couples. Free body diagrams, equilibrium of a particle and of rigid bodies. Distributed forces. Centers of gravity and centroids. Friction. Trusses, frames, and machines. Internal reactions resulting from axial, shear, torsional, and bending loading. Stress and strain analyses and elementary failure criteria.

Continuum Mechanics

TA, Graduate Course, Spring 2015, Stanford University

For this class I taught lectures, held office hours, and graded homework and exams. One week, in response to student request, I gave lectures on differential geometry and elasticity of rods and shells.

Mechanics of Growth

TA, Graduate Course, Winter 2015, Stanford University

For this class I taught lectures, held office hours, graded homework and exams, and mentored students on their final projects. In particular, I assisted Scott Ulrich in modeling Glioblastoma growth.

Finite Elements

Short Course, April 2015, Universidad Panamericana

The laws of physics at some spatial scales can be expressed with Partial Differential Equations (PDE); for example, mechanical equilibrium or conservation of energy. In engineering systems or medical applications, there is often the need to estimate or predict the spatial distribution of some of these continuous fields in order to optimize design or understand health and disease. Finite Element Analysis (FEA) is a powerful numerical method to solve all sorts of PDE’s over arbitrary geometries. The keystone of FEA is the construction of a so called weak form of the problem.

Finite Elements

Summer Course, June 2015, Universidad Panamericana

Modern medicine is at a turning point and computational modeling is at the epicenter of this transformation. Fluid flow and solid mechanics simulation are engineering tools that can improve diagnosis and treatment of various diseases in a patient specific manner and in a very similar fashion as they have been used in car and airplane design. This workshop is concerned with the modeling and simulation of human respiratory system in health and disease.

Mechanics of Growth

TA, Graduate Course, Winter 2014, Stanford University

For this class I taught lectures, held office hours, graded homework, and mentored students on their final projects. One class I taught was related to my research on skin growth and tissue expansion.

Continuum Mechanics

Short Course, Movember 2013, Universidad Panamericana

In recent decades, the application of the classic theory of continuum mechanics to fields in science such as medicine and biology has made it imperative to study complex non-linear behaviors in a large deformation setting. In this crash course we will cover the basic algebra and analysis of tensors. We then will introduce the kinematics of continua. The third block of the course corresponds to the concepts of stress and the balance laws. We will restrict our attention to hyper-elastic materials. Finally, we will conclude with a survey of applications around modeling of soft biological tissues.

Continuum Mechanics

Co-instructor, Graduate Course, Fall 2013, Stanford University

For this class I co-instructed alongside Ellen Kuhl. I taught half the lectures. A couple of lectures dealt with constitutive models. One of the applications mentioned was the modeling of skin, a central topic of my research. Skin is a nonlinear anisotropic material.

Continuum Mechanics

TA, Winter 2012, Stanford University

For this class I organized and carried out problem sessions, held office hours, graded homework and exams.