Research Projects

This is a list of research projects that may have opportunities for undergraduate students. You can browse all the projects, or view only projects in the following categories:

Electronics

 

CyberMech: A Novel Run-Time Substrate for Cyber-Mechanical Systems

Research categories:  Aerospace Engineering, Civil and Construction, Computational/Mathematical, Computer Engineering and Computer Science, Electronics, Mechanical Systems
School/Dept.: Civil Engineering
Professor: Arun Prakash
Preferred major(s): Structural Engineering, Civil, Mechanical, Aerospace, Computer Science, Electrical
Desired experience:   A strong background in the following areas is preferred: Mathematics, Computer Programming, Mechanics, Physics
Number of positions: 1

This project is also a joint collaborative project between myself, Prof. Shirley Dyke from Mech Eng., and faculty from Computer Science at Washington University (St. Louis). In this project, we are developing a computational platform that enables Real-Time Hybrid Simulations (RTHS) of complex structural systems. As opposed to a pure numerical simulation, a hybrid simulation is one where we have a physical specimen of a particular structural component (say a magneto-rheological damper - that is used to control vibrations of structures such as buildings, bridges, automobiles, air-planes, or space structures), that is combined with a numerical model of the entire structure (in real-time) to simulate how this component would behave / control the oscillations of the full structure. This is a handy approach, because it is difficult and expensive to do actual full-scale testing of the component on large scale structures. The challenges associated with this project are first to devise effective coupling mechanisms that allow 'simulating' the physical component (MR damper) as if it were connected in-place within a large structure, and then to develop a computational platform that enables fast, real-time, control and testing of the component combined in different ways with the numerical model of the entire structure.

 

Developing Brain Computer Interface for Hands-Free Movement Control

Research categories:  Bioscience/Biomedical, Electronics
School/Dept.: Biomedical Engineering
Professor: Zhongming Liu
Preferred major(s): Biomedical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Computer Science
Desired experience:   Signal and System, Digital Signal Processing, Pattern Analysis, Machine Learning
Number of positions: 2

The student will be involved in developing a real-time brain computer interface system. Through this system, a human subject's brain signal will be acquired and analyzed in realtime to decode the subject's intention to move an object in a 2-D plane without involving his/her hands. The system will serve as a prototype for a new-generation medical device to facilitate disabled patients in motor control by only using their minds.

 

Development of a Nanomanufacturing Process

Research categories:  Electronics, Material Science and Engineering, Nanotechnology, Physical Science
School/Dept.: Mechanical Engineering, Birck Nanotechnology Center
Professor: Xianfan Xu
Preferred major(s): Mechanical, Electrical Engineering or Physics.
Desired experience:   Senior standing (in Fall 14); Interested in experimental work; GPA > 3.5; US citizen/permanent resident preferred.
Number of positions: 2

This project is to participate research in the development of a laser-based nanomanufacturing technique. The SURF students will work with graduate students to investigate using laser processes to fabricate nanoscale patterns and nanoscale semiconductor materials such as nanowires. These materials will then be used for developing highly sensitive chemical and biological sensors.

 

Development of a new wind sensor

Research categories:  Agricultural, Electronics, Environmental Science, Innovative Technology/Design, Mechanical Systems
School/Dept.: Agricultural and Biological Engineering
Professor: Jiqin (Jee-Chin) Ni
Preferred major(s): Electrical engineering; computer engineering; mechanical engineering
Desired experience:   Hands-on and technical writing skills, knowledge and experience in electronics.
Number of positions: 1

This project is to develop an innovative and compact wind speed and direction sensor. It is expected to have wide applications. The student’s contribution will be (1) select materials for the sensor and an electronic device; (2) build a prototype sensor and the device that acquires, converts, and displays sensor output; (3) test the sensor and the device; (4) assist in preparing an invention disclosure.

 

SLEEC: Semantically-enriched libraries for effective exa-scale computation

Research categories:  Aerospace Engineering, Civil and Construction, Computational/Mathematical, Computer Engineering and Computer Science, Electronics, Mechanical Systems
School/Dept.: Civil Engineering
Professor: Arun Prakash
Preferred major(s): Structural Engineering, Civil, Mechanical, Aerospace, Computer Science, Electrical
Desired experience:   A strong background in the following areas is preferred: Mathematics, Computer Programming, Mechanics, Physics
Number of positions: 1

This project is in joint collaboration between myself, faculty in the Electrical and Computer Engineering department at Purdue, and a Computational Research Scientist at Sandia National Labs (Albuquerque NM). What we are doing is trying to improve the performance of library subroutines that are commonly employed to solve problems in solid and fluid mechanics, using finite element methods on very large parallel computers, for instance. Most computational libraries are based on well-formulated mathematical operations, however, when researchers utilize these libraries in their own applications, they are unable to transmit this rich mathematical information to the library and to the underlying hardware. We are devising ways to allow researchers to add/annotate these libraries with useful mathematical information that will allow the computer system to make optimizations on the fly to improve the performance of large computational applications. The challenges associated with this project are first to come up with the right set of mathematical information that can enable such performance improvement, and then to find ways to encode into the libraries in a sufficiently general way so that researchers from different disciplines (solids / fluids) may be able to utilize these libraries to their application programs.

 

nanoHUB Research in Nanoscale Science and Engineering

Research categories:  Computational/Mathematical, Computer Engineering and Computer Science, Electronics, Material Science and Engineering, Nanotechnology, Other
Professor: NCN Faculty
Preferred major(s): Electrical, Computer, Materials, or Mechanical Engineering; Physics; Chemistry
Desired experience:   Programming skills in any language are a plus.
Number of positions: 12

Join the http://nanoHUB.org team and help build the growing set of resources being used in all Top 50 Colleges of Engineering (US News & World Report rankings) and over 240,000 annual users in 172 countries. nanoHUB provides over 260 simulation tools that users run from a web browser in a scientific computing cloud. The Network for Computational Nanotechnology (NCN) operates nanoHUB.

You will work with one of the nanoHUB investigators, including Professors Klimeck, Lundstrom, Alam, Datta, and Strachan and others.

You will learn the Rappture (www.rappture.org) toolkit that makes it quick and easy to develop powerful, interactive, web-based applications. You will work with nanotechnologists to put their applications and supporting information on http://nanoHUB.org. You will test new capabilities in nanoHUB cyberinfrastructure. And you will be part of a National Science Foundation-funded effort that is connecting theory, experiment and computation in a way that makes a difference for the future of nanotechnology and the future of scientific communities. Other undergraduate researchers before you have each been able to literally impact over a thousand nanoHUB users (for an example, see https://nanohub.org/resources/normdist); join their legacy and create something that will help your own skills and will help others.

More information: http://nanoHUB.org