Seminar series to continue this fall

The first three talks held this spring for the "Inspiration" Distinguished Seminar Series, "Provocative Talks on the Future of Higher Education," are now available for viewing at the links on this page.

Watch for updates on talks to be scheduled for this fall.

March 26, 2013
C.D. Mote Jr.
C.D. Mote Jr.
Regents Professor and Glenn L. Martin Institute Professor of Engineering and former President, University of Maryland

Predicting the future is usually unreliable. However, simply recognizing the direction to the future when it is little changing is often useful for planning purposes. Such was the case for university planning during the period 1945-1990. However, when the direction to the future changes, as it did during the 1990s, guidance is bound by the new, 21st century direction whatever it may be. This presentation addresses these directions and provides observations for using the 21st century direction in university planning today. Planning for the current direction and stepping away from planning for the former one that no longer exists are surprisingly difficult, but necessary considerations.

3:30 p.m., March 26, Neil Armstrong Hall of Engineering, Kurz Atrium. 4:30 p.m. reception.



Speaker biography
April 4, 2013
Maria Klawe
Maria Klawe
President, Harvey Mudd College

During a three-year period, the number of women majoring in computer science at Harvey Mudd College grew dramatically from 10 percent to 40 percent. Maria Klawe will discuss how this happened, examine strategies for increasing female and minority participation in science and engineering, and share her own story of becoming a female technologist.

3:30 p.m., April 4, Neil Armstrong Hall of Engineering, Kurz Atrium. 4:30 p.m. reception.



Speaker biography
April 10, 2013
Norm Augustine
Norm Augustine
Chairman and CEO, Lockheed Martin Corp., retired

A combination of forces is poised to impact engineering education in a manner perhaps never before observed.  Ironically, a number of these forces are the product of capabilities produced by engineers themselves.  They range from a massive increase in the body of knowledge an engineer is expected to know to a revolution in the manner in which that knowledge is transmitted.  The key to survival will be to embrace change—but without undermining those factors that have made America’s engineering education the benchmark of the field.  This will be a challenge worthy of a profession that has already changed much of the rest of the world.

10:30 a.m., April 10, Neil Armstrong Hall of Engineering, Kurz Atrium. 11:30 a.m. reception.

In addition to his seminar for the Distinguished Seminar Series, Norm Augustine will speak about "The Growing Role—and Problems—Facing Science and Engineering" at 5:30 p.m., Wednesday, April 10, in Fowler Hall, Stewart Center. This seminar also is free and open to the public. No registration is needed.



Speaker biography