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ENE Memo: February 15, 2016

From the Head: 02/15/2016

History repeats 

In the early 1950's engineering education was about to undergo a fundamental transformation nationally and Purdue played key role under the leadership of George Hawkins, who succeeded A.A. Potter as Engineering Dean at Purdue in 1953. In his first year as Dean, Dr. Hawkins established our precursor the Department of Freshman Engineering. Dean Hawkins was a member of the extremely influential Report on Evaluation of Engineering Education (Grinter Report) published in 1955 and he co-led the subsequent Goals for Engineering Education report (1968) much of which drew on the research work by the staff of Freshman Engineering at Purdue. The following extract on the career of George Hawkins captures this period of transformational change.

"During the early years of his term as Dean of Engineering, educational programs were being impacted heavily by the information explosion that followed the release of information generated by research carried on during World War II. Assessing the importance of these developments, Dr. Hawkins was convinced that the next generation of engineers would have to be steeped in the physical and engineering sciences if they were to be able to design the complicated systems being envisioned by American industry. With imagination and courage, he took the steps required to sensitize the faculty to these developments and they, in turn, acted to achieve a major revision of the engineering curriculum at Purdue. Purdue's engineering curriculum was a model for other schools to follow-thus assisting the change to spread all across the nation.

Dr. Hawkins worked with faculty, using faculty seminars, personal contacts, and invited scholars to challenge them to familiarize themselves with the new concepts and the new technology that was emerging. He stressed the need to be prepared for change. He also believed that contemporary engineers should have a better understanding of the social sciences and the humanities if they were to respond to society's needs and demands.

His ideas about a dynamic and changing curriculum were challenged and resisted by some; but with patience and sincerity, he pressed his points. Younger members of the faculty rallied to his cause, and he, in turn, encouraged them to absorb themselves in the work at the scientific frontier of engineering. This they did with a sense of pride and dedication; and curricula changed to reflect an emphasis on applied science rather than the "art" of engineering. Despite his administrative responsibilities, he, himself, devoted as much time as he possibly could to remain at the research forefront of his own specialty-heat and mass transfer.

On the national scene in the early 1960's, Dr. Hawkins was asked to be cochairman of the American Society of Engineering Education's goals study. This study was undertaken at the request of the Engineers Council for Professional Development and was financially underwritten by the National Science Foundation. Once more he made clear his beliefs in a scientifically oriented engineering curriculum, heavily bolstered by advanced graduate study. He was joined in this by many educators who contributed to this study; but again he ran into opposition from some educators across the country. However, as time went by, the view expressed in the Goals Report, was, by and large, accepted nationally." 

Source: Hancock, J.C. (1979) George Andrew Hawkins (1907-1978), in Memorial Tributes, Vol 1, National Academies Press, pp112-117.

I was particularly struck by the observation that Hawkins' "ideas about a dynamic and changing curriculum were challenged and resisted by some; but with patience and sincerity, he pressed his points. Younger members of the faculty rallied to his cause, and he, in turn, encouraged them to absorb themselves in the work at the scientific frontier of engineering."

Fifty years later we experienced similar resistance when introducing new courses, and curricula and in having engineering education research recognized. Times may change, contexts may change, the foci of reform may change but the response awaiting reformers does not; it remains constant and unchanging. So while history never repeats, the threat of change produces a predictable set of responses. We should not be surprised.        

David

Kudos: 02/15/2016

... to Cole Joslyn, Matilde Sanchez Pena, Emilie Siverling, and Héctor E. Rodríguez-Simmonds on each passing their Readiness Assessment. Congratulations!

....to Senay Purzer, Nicholas Fila, and Kavin Nataraja for their recent publication, Evaluation of current assessment methods in engineering entrepreneurship education in Advances in Engineering Education, 5(1), 1-27. 

News and Information: 02/15/2016

Suicide Prevention training available

Question, Persuade and Refer (or QPR) are three simple steps that anyone can learn to help save a life from suicide.  Just as people trained in CPR and the Heimlich maneuver help save thousands of lives each year, people trained in QPR learn how to recognize the warning signs of a suicide crisis and how to question, persuade and refer someone to help.  “It is key to empower the Purdue community to be able to recognize and assist individuals who may be struggling,” says Julie Cox, associate dean of students.  “Suicide is something that affects all walks of life and our hope is that if we provide good tools for people to keep in their toolbox for when these situations arise, we can all work to help Boilermakers get the help and support they need.”

  • Tuesday, February 16 from 11:30am-1:30pm in SCHL B38
  • Wednesday, February 17 from 11:30am-1:30pm in SCHL B38
  • Wednesday, February 18 from 5pm-7pm in KRACH 260
  • Monday, February 22 from 5pm-7pm in KRACH 260
  • Wednesday, February 24 from 11:30am-1:30pm in SCHL B38
  • Thursday, March 3 from 5pm-7pm in KRACH 260
  • Monday, March 7 from 5pm-7pm in KRACH 260
  • Tuesday, March 8 from 11:30am-1:30pm in SCHL B38
  • Wednesday, March 9 from 11:30-1:30pm in SCHL B38
  • Wednesday, March 23 from 11:30am-1:30pm in SCHL B38
  • Wednesday, March 23 from 5pm-7pm in KRACH 260
  • Tuesday, April 5 from 11:30am-1:30pm in SCHL B38
  • Tuesday, April 12 from 11:30am-1:30pm in SCHL B38
  • Wednesday, April 13 from 11:30am-1:30pm in SCHL B38
  • Tuesday, April 19 from 11:30am-1:30pm in SCHL B38

To register to attend one of the sessions please visit https://purdue.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_b3OtZmvbju4E8w5


Faculty Award nominations sought

On behalf of the ENE Faculty Development and Recognition Committee, I am pleased to invite nominations for the ENE Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching and the ENE Award for Excellence in Graduate Teaching. The criteria and guidelines for both awards are below. Please send each nomination as a single PDF document attached to an e-mail message to mloui@purdue.edu by the end of the afternoon (5:00 p.m.) on Friday, March 11, 2016.

ENE Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching

Purpose: To recognize excellence in undergraduate teaching in ENE.

Eligibility: All faculty and instructional staff members who have taught semester-length ENE undergraduate courses (ENGR 131, 132, 133, 141, 142, 195; all IDE and MDE courses) at least two times. No person may receive this award more than once in a five-year period. Graduate students who teach ENE courses are not eligible for this award, because they are eligible for the Magoon Awards sponsored by the College of Engineering.

Award: One annual award of $500. Name engraved on permanently displayed plaque provided by the College of Engineering.

Criteria:

  • Instructional effectiveness
  • Course improvement and innovation
  • Impact on students
  • Other contributions, which may include some of the following: advising individual undergraduates and student organizations, mentoring undergraduate student research, committee service and professional activities related to undergraduate teaching, creation and publication of instructional materials, contributions to instructional development of others

Format: A two-page, single-spaced narrative; the narrative may include results of student evaluations. Two pages of supporting comments from students or alumni who previously took the nominee’s course(s) but are not currently enrolled in a course taught by the nominee. Comments may also come from students who have worked with the nominee as peer teachers or as graduate teaching assistants.

Schedule:

Nominations due Friday, March 11, 2016; Decisions by Friday, March 25, 2016

Note: A winner of this award may be eligible for nomination for the College of Engineering’s A. A. Potter Best Teacher Award and the campus’s Murphy Outstanding Undergraduate Teaching Award in subsequent academic years.

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ENE Award for Excellence in Graduate Teaching

Purpose: To recognize excellence in graduate teaching in ENE.

Eligibility: All faculty and instructional staff members who have taught semester-length ENE graduate courses at least two times. No person may receive this award more than once in a five-year period.

Award: One annual award of $500. Name engraved on permanently displayed plaque.

Criteria:

  • Instructional effectiveness
  • Course improvement and innovation
  • Impact on students
  • Other contributions, which may include some of the following: committee service and professional activities related to graduate teaching, creation and publication of instructional materials, contributions to the development of graduate teaching assistants

Format: A two-page, single-spaced narrative. Two pages of supporting comments from students or alumni who previously took the nominee’s course(s) but are not currently enrolled in a course taught by the nominee.

Schedule:

Nominations due Friday, March 11, 2016; Decisions by Friday, March 25, 2016


 

Calendar: 02/15/2016

Calendar: 02/08/2016

 

Spring 2016 

  • Feb 18: Faculty Meeting, 9:30-11:20 am, WANG 3501
  • Feb 18: ENE Research Seminar, 3:30-4:30pm, ARMS BO71 (Weekly)
  • Feb 19: ENE Friday Noon-Thirty Lunch, 12:30-1:30 pm, WANG Kitchen
  • Feb 25: Faculty Meeting 9:30-11:20 am, WANG 3501
  • Feb 26: ENE Friday Noon-Thirty Lunch, 12:30-1:30 pm, WANG Kitchen
  • March 4: ENE Friday Noon-Thirty Lunch, 12:30-1:30 pm, WANG Kitchen
  • March 10: Faculty Meeting, 9:30-11:20 am, WANG 3501
  • March 11: ENE Friday Noon-Thirty Lunch, 12:30-1:30 pm, WANG Kitchen
  • March 14/19: Spring Break 
  • March 24: ENE Primary Committee (Assistant cases), 9:30-11:20am, WANG 3501
  • March 25: Staff Meeting, 8:30-9:30am, Wang 3501  
  • March 25: ENE Friday Noon-Thirty Lunch, 12:30-1:30 pm, WANG Kitchen
  • March 31: Faculty Meeting, 9:30-11:20 am, WANG 3501
  • April 1: ENE Friday Noon-Thirty Lunch, 12:30-1:30 pm, WANG Kitchen
  • April 4: ENE Primary Committee (Associate cases), 2:00-5:00pm, WANG 3501
  • April 8: ENE Friday Noon-Thirty Lunch, 12:30-1:30 pm, WANG Kitchen
  • April 11/12: ENE Industrial Advisory Council  
  • April 14: Faculty Career Colloquium (Dr. Radcliffe), 3:30-4:20pm
  • April 15: ENE Friday Noon-Thirty Lunch, 12:30-1:30 pm, WANG Kitchen
  • April 20: ENE Outstanding Alumni Awards (note change of date)
  • April 21: Faculty Meeting, 9:30-11:20 am, WANG 3501
  • April 22: ENE Friday Noon-Thirty Lunch, 12:30-1:30 pm, WANG Kitchen
  • April 29: ENE Friday Noon-Thirty Lunch, 12:30-1:30 pm, WANG Kitchen
  • April 30: Classes end
  • May 5: Faculty Meeting, 9:30-11:20 am, WANG 3501
  • May 10: Grades Due
  • May 11/12: ENE Strategic Advance
  • May 13: Engineering Commencement, 8pm, Elliot Hall of Music

Summer 2016

Fall 2016

  • Aug 15: Faculty return  
  • Aug 17: ENE Advance (TBD)
  • Aug 22: Classes begin

Funding Opportunities: 02/15/2016

Selected Funding Opportunities

DOC-NIST Graduate Student Measurement Science and Engineering (GMSE) Fellowship Program NIST is soliciting proposals from eligible applicants for a Graduate Student Measurement Science and Engineering (GMSE) Fellowship Program that will provide doctoral-level graduate students with opportunities and financial assistance to obtain laboratory experiences within the NIST laboratories in the STEM disciplines. The recipient will work with NIST to foster collaborative STEM research relationships among NIST, doctoral-level graduate students, and the students’ academic institutions. Deadline: April 7

DOC-NIST Standards Services Curricula Development (SSCD) Cooperative Agreement Program The SSCD Program provides financial assistance to support curriculum development for the undergraduate and/or graduate level. These cooperative agreements support the integration of standards and standardization information and content into seminars, courses, and learning resources for U.S. colleges and universities. The recipients will work with NIST to strengthen education and learning about standards and standardization.  Deadline: April 5

NEH Institutes for Advanced Topics in the Digital Humanities These NEH grants support national or regional (multistate) training programs for scholars and advanced graduate students to broaden and extend their knowledge of digital humanities. Through these programs, NEH seeks to increase the number of humanities scholars using digital technology in their research and to broadly disseminate knowledge about advanced technology tools and methodologies relevant to the humanities. Deadline: March 15

Gates Foundation Grand Challenges China: New Interventions for Global Health  This challenge focuses on calls for innovative concepts for safe, effective, affordable and widely utilized interventions, such as vaccines and therapeutics, with the potential to protect against the acquisition, progression or transmission of infectious diseases that disproportionately affect the world’s poorest.  This call is in partnership with the National Natural Science Foundation of China and requires substantive collaborations between China-based investigators and those based outside of China.  Deadline: March 14

Other:   

Please contact Sue Grimes (sgrimes@purdue.edu), Kristyn Jewell (kristynj@purdue.edu), or Perry Kirkham (pkirkham@purdue.edu) with any questions.

To suggest content for future issues of ENE Memo, contact Teresa Morris or David Radcliffe by midday Friday for the following week's issue.