Purdue Engineering Impact Magazine

ECE Spring 2010

V. 'Ragu' BalakrishnanWelcome to the Spring 2010 issue of ECE Impact magazine. In this issue, our focus is risk taking and the degree to which our faculty, students and alumni are delving into innovative and groundbreaking fields.

In these pages you will see just how far our constituents are going to explore the reaches of electrical and computer engineering, and indeed to address the needs of an increasingly global society.

Our faculty members are pioneering safety research aimed at protecting athletes from head injury; our alumni are revolutionizing treatment for clinical depression using transcranial magnetic stimulation; our students are winning internships at NASA to focus on designing systems to monitor radiation in the space environment. These accomplishments illustrate only a few of the risks members of our ECE family are taking to push the limits of knowledge.

Thank you for your enthusiasm and support. We are excited by all that is happening in electrical and computer engineering at Purdue, and intend to continue our forward momentum, keeping a keen ear to industry and societal needs.

V. “Ragu” Balakrishnan
Professor and Head of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Telling a Thousand Stories
May 26, 2010
One alumnus’ photography project reaches out
Stimulating Hope
May 26, 2010
Alumnus helps pioneer new, non-pharmaceutical treatment for clinical depression
Graduate Support
May 26, 2010
Donors help lift graduate students to new heights
Eyes on the Prize
May 26, 2010
Award-winning graduate students are set to go far
It's a Two-Screen Job
May 26, 2010
ECN systems engineer keeps things moving
Engineer Unplugged
May 26, 2010
Alumnus talks about the world going wireless
Head Injury Study Scores Early Touchdown
May 26, 2010
ECE’s Thomas Talavage is co-leading a pioneering study of high school football players’ head traumas. It is the first to use magnetic resonance imaging and cognitive testing pre-season and again after hits to the head — including those registering less than concussion-level. The multidisciplinary team is learning that cognitive deficiencies can occur even without a concussion, indicating that increased screening after minor hits may be warranted, and that brains, like bodies, need rest after injury.
Light-Years Ahead
May 26, 2010
Faculty research advances field of nanophotonics
Vladimir Shalaev