Life Science Elective List

At least 6 credit hours must be established from the following areas: Biophysics/Biochemistry, Cellular/Developmental/Neurobiology, Microbiology, Molecular, Physiology
 
Please check myPurdue for course availability and pre-requisites. In some cases instructor permission and/or a departmental override might have to be requested.
 

Junior Fall

Junior Spring

Senior Fall

Senior Spring

BIOL 241
BIOL 301
BIOL 415
BIOL 420
BIOL 432
BIOL 436
BIOL 438
BCHM 561
HK 440 or HK 445
BIOL 241
BIOL 302
BIOL 416
BIOL 511
BIOL 562
BCHM 562
HK 440 or HK 445
BIOL 241
BIOL 301
BIOL 415
BIOL 420
BIOL 432 (alt years)
BIOL 436
BIOL 438
BIOL 444
BIOL 478
BIOL 533
BIOL 559
BMS 520
BCHM 561
HK 440 or HK 445
BIOL 241
BIOL 302
BIOL 416
BIOL 511
BIOL 516
BIOL 517
BIOL 537
BIOL 538
BIOL 562
BIOL 599
BMS 521
BCHM 562
HK 440 or HK 445

Junior Summer

 Senior Summer

BMS 510 (offered odd years)
BMS 510 (offered odd years)
BIOL 420
BIOL 438
BMS 525

 

Life Science Electives by Subject Area:

Biophysical and Biochemistry

BIOL 478 (3) Introduction to Bioinformatics
BIOL 511 (3) Introduction to X-Ray Crystallography
BIOL 595 (3) Methods & Measurements in Physical Biochemistry
BCHM 561 (3) General Biochemistry I
BCHM 562 (3) General Biochemistry I
 

Cell, Developmental, and Neurobiology

BIOL 420 (3) Eukaryotic Cell Biology
BIOL 436 (3) Neurobiology
BIOL 538 (3) Molecular, Cellular & Developmental Neurobiology
BIOL 562 (3) Neural Systems
 

Microbiology

BIOL 438 (3) General Microbiology
BIOL 533 (3) Medical Microbiology
 

Molecular

BIOL 241 (3) Genetics & Molecular Biology
BIOL 415 (3) Introduction to Molecular Biology
BIOL 416 (3) Viruses and Viral Disease
BIOL 444 (3) Human Genetics
BIOL 516 (3) Molecular Biology of Cancer
BIOL 517 (2) Molecular Biology: Proteins
 

Physiology

BIOL 301 (3) Human Design: Anatomy and Physiology
BIOL 302 (3) Human Design: Anatomy and Physiology
BIOL 432 (3) Reproductive Physiology
BIOL 537 (3) Immunobiology
BIOL 559 (3) Endocrinology
BIOL 599 (3) Quantitative Physiology
BMS 510 (3) Human Anatomy For BioMed Scientists/Engrs.
BMS 520 (3) Systemic Mammalian Physiology I
BMS 521 (3) Systemic Mammalian Physiology II
BMS 525 (2) Principles of Neuroanatomy
HK 440 (3) Human Diseases and Disorders
HK 445 (3) Principles of Epidemiology
 

Fall Semester Courses - Junior Year

BIOL 301 (3) Human Design: Anatomy and Physiology
A study of human function, emphasizing physiology of body tissues and systems. Relevant aspects of anatomy and histology are also included. Use of examples from current medical practice encourages application of knowledge to predict symptoms of disease and rationale for treatment. Topics covered include histophysiology of cells and tissues, nerve and muscle physiology, the nervous system, and cardiovascular dynamics.
 
BIOL 415 (3) Introduction to Molecular Biology
Prerequisites: BIOL 230 & BME 201
An introduction to modern molecular biology techniques and how they are utilized to address current topics in eukaryotic gene expression. Emphasis will be placed on experimental procedures and model systems, such as site-directed mutagenesis of isolated genes and their subsequent introduction into mammalian cells. Topics will include the molecular control mechanisms associated with RNA transcription and processing, protein-DNA interactions, gene regulation in development and growth control.
 
BIOL 420 (3) Eukaryotic Cell Biology
Prerequisites: BIOL 230 & BME 201
The course covers specific topics on the structure and function of eukaryotic cells. The first half of the course includes an analysis of the function of membrane bound organelles (especially the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, and lysosomes). Protein targeting to these organelles is examined in detail. The second half covers muscle and actin-based non-muscle motility, cilia and other microtubule-based movements, and ends with the regulation of the cell cycle and growth control. The course emphasizes the experimental basis for understanding of organelle function /regulatory events.
 
BIOL 432 (3) Reproductive Physiology
Prerequisites: BIOL 230 & BME 201
This course provides an integrated approach to examining how tissues interact to regulate reproductive processes. Each section begins by describing fundamental commonalities of a reproductive event in a variety of species. This is followed by an emphasis on the details in the details of that event among species. Some of the topics to be covered include ovarian and testicular functions, puberty and the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, fertilization, establishment of the placenta, maternal support of pregnancy, parturition, and lactation.
 
BIOL 436 (3) Neurobiology
Prerequisites: BIOL 230 & BME 201 This course covers the key aspects in molecular, cellular, and developmental neurobiology. Topics include: Cell biology of neurons and glial cells, electrophysiological properties of neurons, electrical and chemical signaling between neurons, synaptic integration and plasticity, development and regeneration of the nervous system and nervous system diseases. Up-to-date research findings and techniques will be included. A basic knowledge of cell biology and protein structure and function is strongly recommended.
 
BIOL 438 (3) General Microbiology
Prerequisites: BIOL 230 & BME 201
Basic concepts specific to microbial structure/function, nutrition, regulation and growth constitute the first section of the course. The next section involves discussions of microbial diversity centering on mechanisms for generating energy and synthesizing essential cell components. The importance of these mechanisms to environmental cycling of key elements is included. The last section deals with the interaction of bacteria with their environments and includes the role of plasmids and viruses, interactions with plants and pathogenicity.
 
BCHM 561 (3) General Biochemistry I
Instructor Permission Required
Protein structure and function, introduction to nucleic acids and molecular biology, properties of enzymes, mechanisms of enzyme action, basic concepts of metabolism, sugar and fatty acid metabolism, introduction to membranes and hormone action.
 
HK 440 (3) Human Diseases and Disorders
Prerequisite Over-Ride required (Must have completed BME 256).
This course examines basic principles related to the causes of disease, its mitigation and prevention. The relationship between heredity, behavior, the immune response and chronic disease is explored. Risk factors for the leading causes of morbidity and mortality are contrasted and compared. The three principal divisions of the course deal with a) heredofamilial disorders, b) infectious diseases, and c) chronic conditions. The public health promotion strategies that might prevent, ameliorate or otherwise mitigate the consequences of disease in a population.
 
HK 445 (3) Principles of Epidemiology
The course is designed to focus on the introduction and application of basic/rudimentary epidemiologic descriptive and analytic statistics. A fundamental understanding of the nature of epidemiologic study as related to human morbidity, mortality, and injury (disability) is provided. Examples of other topics to be presented include the utility of public health vital statistics, concepts of disease transmission, types of epidemiological studies, and causality.
 

Summer School Courses - Junior Year

BMS 510 (4) Human Anatomy For Biomedical Scientists and Engineers
Typically offered Summer, odd year
Instructor Permission, level & major restriction Over-Ride required.
Introduction to the regional study of the human body (lower limb, upper limb, abdomen, pelvis, thorax, head, and neck). Supplemented by observations and demonstrations of prosected cadaver materials, radiographs, osteology, and surface anatomy.
 

Spring Semester Courses - Junior Year

BIOL 241 (3) Genetics & Molecular Biology
Prerequisites: BIOL 230 & CHM 116
This course covers basic principles of classical genetics, molecular biology, and population genetics. The classical genetics section includes discussions on Mendelian genetics, linkage and meiotic mapping, sex determination, cytoplasmic inheritance, and chromosomal aberrations. The molecular biology section continues with discussions on DNA structure and replication, chromosomal organization, transcription, translation, the genetic code, mutations, DNA repair, and transposable elements. Basic regulatory mechanisms in prokaryotic and eukaryotic gene expression, as well as current developments (recombinant DNA technology, cancer-causing genes, imprinting, developmental genetics) are also presented.
 
BIOL 302 (3) Human Design: Anatomy and Physiology
A continuation of BIOL 301. (It is helpful but not essential for this course to be preceded by BIOL 30100.) Topics covered include body fluids and renal function, respiration, endocrine systems, the gastro-intestinal system, exercise physiology, reproduction, and immunity.
 
BIOL 416 (3) Viruses and Viral Disease
Prerequisites: BIOL 230 & BME 201
This course is intended as an introduction into molecular virology. It will emphasize the use of viruses as model systems for the study of macromolecules. The first third of the course will be an introduction to virology and examination of the molecular techniques used to study viruses. The second third of the course will focus on specific virus systems and how molecular biology, biochemistry, and structural biology have impacted our understanding of viruses and the disease process. The final third of the course will concentrate on HIV, and viruses as vectors for gene therapy or weapons of bioterrorism, (the AIDS virus) from the molecular to the clinical.
 
BIOL 511 (3) Introduction to X-Ray Crystallography
Instructor permission required.
Analysis of crystal structures by X-ray diffraction methods. Growth and properties of protein crystals. Geometry of diffraction. Measurement of diffraction. Intensity of diffracted waves. Symmetry of crystals. The phase problem. Isomorphous replacement. Molecular replacement. Anomalous diffraction methods. Structure refinement and analysis. Crystallography is a primary method for the determination of the structures of biological macromolecules at near atomic resolution. As such it has a tremendous impact on aspects of biological and biochemical research as diverse as the protein folding problem, the regulation of gene expression, signal transduction, the catalytic functions of enzymes, and the design of therapeutic agents to bind to known receptors.
 
BIOL 562 (3) Neural Systems
Prerequisites: BIOL 230 & BME 301
This course will focus on questions regarding how the functions of the individual cellular components of the nervous system are integrated in the brain and nervous system to produce behavior and higher mental functions. The course will address the structure and function of specific neural systems such as the motor systems, somatosensory systems, visual and auditory systems, learning and memory, and higher cortical function. It will draw extensively on subject matter concerning the molecular and cellular biology of the nervous system presented in BIOL 436 Introduction to Neurobiology, while combining and integrating this material with the relevant neuroanatomy.
 
BCHM 562 (3) General Biochemistry II
Prerequisites: BCHM 561
Course Content: Amino acid metabolism, photosynthesis, biosynthesis of membrane lipids and steroids, biosynthesis of nucleotides, structure and function of nucleic acids, protein synthesis, and control of gene expression.
 
HK 440 (3) Human Diseases and Disorders
Prerequisite Over-Ride required.
This course examines basic principles related to the causes of disease, its mitigation and prevention. The relationship between heredity, behavior, the immune response and chronic disease is explored. Risk factors for the leading causes of morbidity and mortality are contrasted and compared. The three principal divisions of the course deal with a) heredofamilial disorders, b) infectious diseases, and c) chronic conditions. The public health promotion strategies that might prevent, ameliorate or otherwise mitigate the consequences of disease in a population.
 
HK 445 (3) Principles of Epidemiology
The course is designed to focus on the introduction and application of basic/rudimentary epidemiologic descriptive and analytic statistics. A fundamental understanding of the nature of epidemiologic study as related to human morbidity, mortality, and injury (disability) is provided. Examples of other topics to be presented include the utility of public health vital statistics, concepts of disease transmission, types of epidemiological studies, and causality.
 

Summer School Courses - Senior Year

BMS 510 (4) Human Anatomy For Biomedical Scientists and Engineers
Typically offered Summer, odd year
Instructor Permission, level & major restriction Over-Ride required.
Introduction to the regional study of the human body (lower limb, upper limb, abdomen, pelvis, thorax, head, and neck). Supplemented by observations and demonstrations of prosected cadaver materials, radiographs, osteology, and surface anatomy.
 
BMS 525 (3) Principles of Neuroanatomy
Provides an introduction to neuroanatomy. Topics cover fundamental aspects of mammalian nervous system structure at gross and microscopic levels. Logical principles of neural circuits and their specificity will be examined by example, and their overall functionality will be explored within the context of respective systems. Offered in alternate years.
 

Fall Semester Courses - Senior Year

BIOL 301 (3) Human Design: Anatomy and Physiology
A study of human function, emphasizing physiology of body tissues and systems. Relevant aspects of anatomy and histology are also included. Use of examples from current medical practice encourages application of knowledge to predict symptoms of disease and rationale for treatment. Topics covered include histophysiology of cells and tissues, nerve and muscle physiology, the nervous system, and cardiovascular dynamics.
 
BIOL 415 (3) Introduction to Molecular Biology
Prerequisites: BIOL 230 & BME 201
An introduction to modern molecular biology techniques and how they are utilized to address current topics in eukaryotic gene expression. Emphasis will be placed on experimental procedures and model systems, such as site-directed mutagenesis of isolated genes and their subsequent introduction into mammalian cells. Topics will include the molecular control mechanisms associated with RNA transcription and processing, protein-DNA interactions, gene regulation in development and growth control.
 
BIOL 420 (3) Eukaryotic Cell Biology
Prerequisites: BIOL 230 & BME 201
The course covers specific topics on the structure and function of eukaryotic cells. The first half of the course includes an analysis of the function of membrane bound organelles (especially the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, and lysosomes). Protein targeting to these organelles is examined in detail. The second half covers muscle and actin-based non-muscle motility, cilia and other microtubule-based movements, and ends with the regulation of the cell cycle and growth control. The course emphasizes the experimental basis for our understanding of organelle function and regulatory events.
 
BIOL 432 (3) Reproductive Physiology
Prerequisites: BME 201 & BME 256
This course provides an integrated approach to examining how tissues interact to regulate reproductive processes. Each section begins by describing fundamental commonalities of a reproductive event in a variety of species. This is followed by an emphasis on the difference in the details of that event among species. Some of the topics to be covered include ovarian and testicular function, puberty and the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, fertilization, establishment of the placenta, maternal support of pregnancy, parturition, and lactation.
 
BIOL 436 (3) Introduction to Neurobiology
Prerequisites: BIOL 230 & BME 201 This course will cover basic aspects of the structure and function of the nervous system with a strong cellular, molecular and developmental emphasis. Broad areas of consideration will include the cellular and molecular biology of neurons and glia, electrical and chemical signaling in the nervous system, neuronal development and regeneration, the complex interactions between neurons and the processing and integration of neural activity. In addition to the textbook, key research articles will be discussed.
 
BIOL 438 (3) General Microbiology
Prerequisites: BIOL 230 & BME 201
Basic concepts specific to microbial structure/function, nutrition, regulation and growth constitute the first section of the course. The next section involves discussions of microbial diversity centering on mechanisms for generating energy and synthesizing essential cell components. The importance of these mechanisms to environmental cycling of key elements is included. The last section deals with the interaction of bacteria with their environments and includes the role of plasmids and viruses, interactions with plants and pathogenicity.
 
BIOL 444 (3) Human Genetics
Prerequisite: BIOL 241
An intermediate level survey course of human genetics with emphasis on the impact of molecular information. We focus not only on the fundamentals of genome organization, function and variation in molecular terms, but extend our understanding to molecular interpretations of patterns of inheritance, genetic disease, diagnosis and treatment.
 
BIOL 478 (3) Introduction to Bioinformatics
Prerequisite Over-Ride possibly required.
(CS 478 and STAT 478) Bioinformatics is broadly defined as the study of molecular biological information, targeting particularly the enormous volume of DNA sequence and functional complexity embedded in entire genomes. Topics will include understanding the evolutionary organization of genes (genomics), the structure and function of gene products (proteomics), and the dynamics of gene expression in biological processes (transcriptomics). Inherently, bioinformatics is interdisciplinary, melding various applications of computational science with biology. This jointly taught course introduces analytical methods from biology, statistics and computer science that are necessary for bioinformatics investigations.
 
BIOL 533 (3) Medical Microbiology
Prerequisite: BIOL 438
Prerequisite Over-Ride required if BIOL 439 is listed as prerequisite in MyPurdue.
A brief description will be given of the immune system and its roles in fighting against infection followed by criteria used to determine whether a microorganism is responsible for a disease. Discuss pathogenic mechanisms of several groups of important infections agents, including transmission, route of infection and means to avoid the detection by the immune system. Treatment of infectious disease and the current challenges in this aspect will also be covered. Discuss strategies and methods used to study bacterial pathogenesis. Describe bioterrorism and biodefense. All topics will be discussed along with reading assignments of relevant up-to-date research articles.
 
BIOL 559 (3) Endocrinology
Prerequisites: None. However, BIOL 231 or 270 & BIOL 241 or 280 are encouraged.
This course is an investigation into the role of hormones in regulating physiological and biochemical processes. An experimental approach to a variety of topics is emphasized. Topics include: hormone structure and mechanism of action and the role of hormones in regulating homeostasis, growth, development, and reproduction.
 
BIOL 595 (3) Developmental Biology
Prerequisites: BIOL 231 or 270 & 241 or 280 & 415 or instructor permission. BME advisor recommends BIOL 415.
Principles of development will be studied in a lecture format course. Emphasis will be on a pattern formation in model systems, such as Drosophilia embryogenesis, vertebrate nervous system and vertebrate limbs. A strong background in cell and molecular biology is recommended.
 
BIOL 595 (3) Methods & Measurements in Physical Biochemistry
Prerequisites: PHYS 172 & 272 & Calc I & II or instructor permission.
This course is intended as an introduction to physical methods in biochemistry and aims to provide an understanding of the techniques of spectroscopy, diffraction, magnetic resonance and other physical methods. The purpose of the course is to expose students to the application of these techniques to specific problems in biological systems, the interpretation of the resulting data, and analysis of the strengths and limitations of each technique. Specific techniques to be covered are: UV/Vis spectroscopy, circular dichroism, IR and Raman spectroscopy, fluorescence, neutron diffraction, light scattering, scattering from ordered materials, x-ray crystallography, NMR and ESR spectroscopy, electron microscopy, mass spectroscopy.
 
BMS 520 (3) Systemic Mammalian Physiology I
Departmental Over-Ride might be required.
The first of two courses offered to graduate students and advanced undergraduate students. It covers the general physiological processes of mammals with special emphasis on domestic animals. These processes are presented as interactions between large populations of cells, organs, organ systems, and the integrated functions of an entire animal. This course covers the nervous system, musculoskeletal system, circulatory system, and the regulation of body fluids.
 
BMS 521 (3) Systemic Mammalian Physiology II
Comparative mammalian (domesticated and human) physiology, with emphasis upon principles, concepts, and mechanism of the cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, endocrine, and reproductive systems.
 
BCHM 562 (3) General Biochemistry II
Prerequisite: BCHM 561
Course Content: Amino acid metabolism, photosynthesis, biosynthesis of membrane lipids and steroids, biosynthesis of nucleotides, structure and function of nucleic acids, protein synthesis, and control of gene expression.
 
HK 440 (3) Human Diseases and Disorders
Prerequisite Over-Ride required.
This course examines basic principles related to the causes of disease, its mitigation and prevention. The relationship between heredity, behavior, the immune response and chronic disease is explored. Risk factors for the leading causes of morbidity and mortality are contrasted and compared. The three principal divisions of the course deal with a) heredofamilial disorders, b) infectious diseases, and c) chronic conditions. The public health promotion strategies that might prevent ameliorate or otherwise mitigate the consequences of disease in a population.
 
HK 445 (3) Principles of Epidemiology
The course is designed to focus on the introduction and application of basic/rudimentary epidemiologic descriptive and analytic statistics. A fundamental understanding of the nature of epidemiologic study as related to human morbidity, mortality, and injury (disability) is provided. Examples of other topics to be presented include the utility of public health vital statistics, concepts of disease transmission, types of epidemiological studies, and causality.
 

Spring Semester Courses - Senior Year

BIOL 241 (3) Genetics & Molecular Biology
Prerequisites: BIOL 230 & CHM 116
This course covers basic principles of classical genetics, molecular biology, and population genetics. The classical genetics section includes discussions on Mendelian genetics, linkage and meiotic mapping, sex determination, cytoplasmic inheritance, and chromosomal aberrations. The molecular biology section continues with discussions on DNA structure and replication, chromosomal organization, transcription, translation, the genetic code, mutations, DNA repair, and transposable elements. Basic regulatory mechanisms in prokaryotic and eukaryotic gene expression, as well as current developments (recombinant DNA technology, cancer-causing genes, imprinting, developmental genetics) are also presented.
 
BIOL 302 (3) Human Design: Anatomy and Physiology
A continuation of BIOL 301. (It is helpful but not essential for this course to be preceded by BIOL 30100.) Topics covered include body fluids and renal function, respiration, endocrine systems, the gastro-intestinal system, exercise physiology, reproduction, and immunity.
 
BIOL 416 (3) Viruses and Viral Diseases
Prerequisites: BIOL 230 & BME 201
This course is intended as an introduction into molecular virology. It will emphasize the use of viruses as model systems for the study of macromolecules. The first third of the course will be an introduction to virology and examination of the molecular techniques used to study viruses. The second third of the course will focus on specific virus systems and how molecular biology, biochemistry, and structural biology have impacted our understanding of viruses and the disease process. The final third of the course will concentrate on HIV, and viruses as vectors for gene therapy or weapons of bioterrorism, (the AIDS virus) from the molecular to the clinical.
 
BIOL 511 (3) Introduction to X-Ray Crystallography
Instructor permission required.
Analysis of crystal structures by X-ray diffraction methods. Growth and properties of protein crystals. Geometry of diffraction. Measurement of diffraction. Intensity of diffracted waves. Symmetry of crystals. The phase problem. Isomorphous replacement. Molecular replacement. Anomalous diffraction methods. Structure refinement and analysis. Crystallography is a primary method for the determination of the structures of biological macromolecules at near atomic resolution. As such it has a tremendous impact on aspects of biological and biochemical research as diverse as the protein folding problem, the regulation of gene expression, signal transduction, the catalytic functions of enzymes, and the design of therapeutic agents to bind to known receptors.
 
BIOL 516 (3) Molecular Biology of Cancer
Prerequisites: BIOL 230 & BME 301
The course begins with a review of the current research techniques used to examine the biology of eukaryotic cells and then covers seminal discoveries in the areas of cell cycle regulation, DNA and RNA tumor virology, growth factors and their receptors, signal transduction and oncogenes. For all topics, an emphasis is placed on the molecular mechanisms governing growth regulation and how alterations in these mechanisms can give rise to disease states such as cancer. Reading of current literature is required.
 
BIOL 517 (2) Molecular Biology: Proteins
Prerequisites: BIOL 230 & BME 201
The principles of protein three-dimensional structure are examined. The course is divided into "theoretical" and "application" sections. In the theoretical section, general principles of protein structure are discussed in detail. In the application section, the structural principles learned in the first part of the course are applied to particular protein systems. Topics covered in the theoretical section of the course include covalent structure of proteins; protein secondary, tertiary and quaternary structure; physical forces influencing protein structure; protein surface areas and internal packing; internal motion in protein molecules; protein folding; comparison of protein primary and prediction of tertiary structures; and structural features of integral membrane proteins.
 
BIOL 537 (3) Immunobiology
Prerequisites: BIOL 230 & BIOL 241. BIOL 415 & 420 are recommended as pre-requisites.
Introductory course for graduate and senior undergraduate students interested in how the body protects itself from infectious disease. What constitutes the immune system, how it functions, and what might go wrong. Work in a peer-learning team to understand and present research papers.
 
BIOL 538 (3) Molecular, Cellular & Developmental Neurobiology
Prerequisites: BIOL 230 & BME 201
From Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease to stroke and neurotrauma, neurological disease and injury present some of the most debilitating and intractable medical problems. Recent progress in molecular neuroscience has begun to reveal the mechanisms of several human neurological diseases and to suggest potential therapies. Biology 538 explores topics in basic cellular, molecular and developmental neuroscience and their connections to neural disease and injury. Readings are derived from the current literature.
 
BIOL 562 (3) Neural Systems
Prerequisites: BIOL 230 & BME 301
This course will focus on questions regarding how the functions of the individual cellular components of the nervous system are integrated in the brain and nervous system to produce behavior and higher mental functions. The course will address the structure and function of specific neural systems such as the motor systems, somatosensory systems, visual and auditory systems, learning and memory, and higher cortical function. It will draw extensively on subject matter concerning the molecular and cellular biology of the nervous system presented in BIOL 495N Introduction to Neurobiology, while combining and integrating this material with the relevant neuroanatomy.
 
BIOL 599 (3) Quantitative Physiology
Prerequisites: BIOL 230, BME 290 & BME 301
Develop an understanding of the physical and chemical factors that are responsible for living systems. Normal relationships between physiological mechanisms and their subsequent phenomena, both empirical and theoretical.  These relationships will be reinforced by homework assignments utilizing software models of these phenomena. This foundation in normal physiological systems will also be complemented by subsequent topics on system pathologies. The effects of these pathologies, as well as their amelioration via medical interventions (devices or drugs) will be explored through software.
 
BMS 521 (3) Systemic Mammalian Physiology II)
Prerequisites: BMS 520
Comparative mammalian (domesticated and human) physiology, with emphasis upon principles, concepts, and mechanisms of the cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, endocrine, and reproductive systems.
 
BCHM 562 (3) General Biochemistry II
Prerequisite: BCHM 562
Amino acid metabolism, photosynthesis, biosynthesis of membrane lipids and steroids, biosynthesis of nucleotides, structure and function of nucleic acids, protein synthesis, and control of gene expression.
 
HK 440 (3) Human Diseases and Disorders
Prerequisite Over-Ride required.
This course examines basic principles related to the causes of disease, its mitigation and prevention. The relationship between heredity, behavior, the immune response and chronic disease is explored. Risk factors for the leading causes of morbidity and mortality are contrasted and compared. The three principal divisions of the course deal with a) heredofamilial disorders, b) infectious diseases, and c) chronic conditions. The public health promotion strategies that might prevent ameliorate or otherwise mitigate the consequences of disease in a population.
 
HK 445 (3) Principles of Epidemiology
The course is designed to focus on the introduction and application of basic/rudimentary epidemiologic descriptive and analytic statistics. A fundamental understanding of the nature of epidemiologic study as related to human morbidity, mortality, and injury (disability) is provided. Examples of other topics to be presented include the utility of public health vital statistics, concepts of disease transmission, types of epidemiological studies, and causality

Updated: 01/09/14