BME News

News & Events Archives

Fourth Summer Seminar Held
July 12, 2005
Graduate student Marc Normandin has presented the fourth summer seminar on Kinetic Modeling of Positron Emission Tomography Data: Probing the Dopamine System. Neurotransmitters are chemical compounds that transmit nerve impulses across synapses (the junction between two nerve cells or neurons). Dopamine is a neurotransmitter that has been implicated in the processing of rewarding stimuli, and the reinforcing effects of drugs and alcohol are believed to be associated with the speed of dopamine release. While reinforcing rewarding stimuli can be a good thing, in the case of alcohol or drugs it could have serious repercussions including triggering substance abuse and dependence.
Ai-Lin Chun Wins Best Poster Award
June 29, 2005
Ai-Lin Chun was just notified that she won the best poster award in the Materials Chemistry Division at the CSC 2005 meeting in Saskatoon.
 
Third Summer Seminar Held
June 29, 2005
Graduate student Aaron Kyle has presented the third summer seminar series on Feasibility and Design of an Acoustic Guidance System for Fluid-Filled IV Catheters. Acoustic-guidance has proven to be valuable in the placement and monitoring of air-filled breathing tubes. Yet, some of the greatest potential for use of such systems lies in the areas of vascular and urological medicine, where tubes and catheters in clinical use are liquid-filled. The research being done by Kyle, under faculty advisors George R. Wodicka and J. Stuart Bolton, begins the process of adapting the systems for use in liquid environments. The research has found that acoustic transmission line analysis can be used to accurately model acoustic performance in simple liquid-filled tubes, paving the way for adaptation into complex catheter systems.
BME SURF Students' Research Showcased
June 27, 2005
The research being done by two BME SURF (Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships) students has been garnering a lot of attention recently.
 
New Strides In Paralysis Research
June 22, 2005
When the spinal cord is injured, the problem is not just the injury itself but tissue damage that occurs after the initial injury. Researchers with Purdue's Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering and the School of Veterinary Medicine appear to have isolated the major cause of the tissue damage, Acrolein. Produced naturally by the body, it is benign at normal levels but becomes toxic as its concentration increases. While this identification is not a cure, it does offer promising avenues for further research and the exploration of potential treatment options to reduce or eliminate secondary damage. Led by Dr. Riyi Shi, an Associate Professor in Neuroscience and in Biomedical Engineering, the team includes student Jian Luo and Nagoya University student Koji Uchida. Dr. Shi also works with Dr. Richard Borgens on the development of PEG, used to help the membranes of spinal cells heal after an injury. The news release from Purdue's University News Service provides more information, and additional coverage can be found at the Lafayette Journal & Courier.
 
Second Summer Seminar Held
June 22, 2005
Graduate student Aaron Lottes has presented the second summer seminar series on Improving Survival from Long-Duration CPR. The research, in part, looks at cellular chemical activity and the need to replace chemicals during prolonged CPR. Open to students, faculty, staff, and prospective students, the Summer Seminar series provides students the opportunity to present research and develop presentation skills in a friendly and supportive environment. After the presentation, there is a session for technical questions, then a session to provide feedback and constructive criticism on the presentation itself.

Students who take part in the series are eligible for the Fearnot Prize. Dr. Neal Fearnot, a Purdue alumnus and president of MED Institute, established this award because he felt that the experience he gained as a student presenter at the BME summer seminar series was extremely valuable. The award is presented to the graduate student whose presentation receives the highest evaluation from the faculty, students and staff attending the seminars.

Professor Haberstroh Named Recipient of Coulter Foundation Early Career Translational Research Award
June 13, 2005
Professor Karen Haberstroh has received a Coulter Foundation Early Career Translational Research Award in Biomedical Engineering for her work on in vivo efficacy of nano-structured bladder tissue replacement constructs.
 
Professor Webster Receives Coulter Foundation's Early Career Award
June 13, 2005
Professor Tom Webster has received notification that his proposal entitled "Bionanotechnology for the improvement of orthopedic implants" has been selected by the Coulter Foundation to receive an Early Career Translational Research Award.
 
First Summer Seminar Held
June 08, 2005
The topic of Proprioception, Gait Kinematics, and Rate of Loading During Walking: Are They Related?, presented by graduate student Jody Riskowsi, premiered the 2005 Summer Seminar series at the Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering. This series, held for students, faculty, staff, and prospective students, allows students the opportunity to present research and develop presentation skills in a friendly and supportive environment. After the presentation, there is a session for technical questions, then a session to provide feedback and constructive criticism on the presentation itself.
Brian Ward Selected PhD Student Award Finalist
May 18, 2005
Brian Ward, a graduate student in the joint MD/PhD program sponsored by Purdue BME and the IU School of Medicine, has been selected as a PhD Student Award Finalist at the upcoming 2005 Summer Bioengineering Conference.
 

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