Professor Michael Sangid receives AFOSR Young Investigator Award

Event Date: February 19, 2014
Michael D. Sangid, assistant professor of aeronautics and astronautics has received a grant from the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) through its Young Investigator Program (YIP) award.

Photo of Michael Sangid and Andrea RovinelliMichael D. Sangid, assistant professor of aeronautics and astronautics has received a grant from the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) through its Young Investigator Program (YIP) award. The AFOSR will award approximately $15.5 million in grants to 42 scientists and engineers who submitted winning research proposals through the program. The YIP is open to scientists and engineers at research institutions across the United States who received a Ph.D. or equivalent degrees in the last five years and show exceptional ability and promise for conducting basic research. The objective of this program is to foster creative basic research in science and engineering, enhance early career development of outstanding young investigators, and increase opportunities for the young investigators to recognize the Air Force mission and the related challenges in science and engineering. This year AFOSR received 234 proposals in response to the AFOSR broad agency announcement solicitation in major areas of interest to the Air Force.

Prof. Sangid will receive $360K for three years for his proposed research “Identifying The Crack Driving Force Mechanism Through Bayesian Analysis”. This research will combine state-of-the-art crystal plasticity modeling and high energy x-ray diffraction/tomography to make inferences on the mechanism that drives a crack to propagate through polycrystalline Ti alloys. The work is made possible through on going collaborations with Dr. Wolfgang Ludwig (European Synchrotron Radiation Source) and Dr. Ricardo Lebensohn (Los Alamos National Lab). PhD graduate candidate, Andrea Rovinelli, is instrumental in this project, combining his knowledge of materials modeling and numerical simulations to better understand the critical problem of fatigue crack growth. Andrea spent last year visiting Purdue from the University of Bologna, Italy to complete his MS thesis with Prof. Sangid, entitled "Influence of Microstructure Variability on Short Crack Growth Behavior."

Prof. Sangid received his PhD from Mechanical Engineering at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign in 2010. He is a recipient of the TMS Young Leaders Award in 2013.

 

Pictured above is Professor Michael Sangid (right) and AAE PhD graduate candidate Andrea Rovinelli